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Dead Sci-fi writers
#61
John: You haven't heard of them because they're part of the story, not RL (yet)

Thing is, more and more religions are condemning harming the environment as a sin. This is a first step toward the dystopian backstory.
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#62
Some religions have always worshipped Gaea, nothing new there. It is the backlash from Hollywood and Environmentalist whackos that intrude on established religions - and it is Hollywood and the Environmental whacko that want to call attention to it and claim it is ingrained in the established religions.

Now that Global Warming Alarmism is in the decline and the pro AGW have been outed as liars and kooks, the whole Earth as better than people thing may go away.
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#63
James P. Hogan passed away last month, on July 12th. I have read a good deal of his material, and have a few favorites.

I was looking up his work about WWII, "The Proteus Operation", and was going to read it fairly soon, when I came across the news.

Hogan was a consummate Libertarian, and also an avid anti-Global Warming person. He has written several articles on this, and if you go to his home page, you can read some of them.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#64
Not again. Are you sure that was James P. Hogan the writer, and not some other James P. Hogan?

Just checked.

You're right. Sadly, it was James P. Hogan, author of the Giant series.
Quote:Issue Number : 59 - James P. Hogan Dies at Age 69.


TO: JAMES P. HOGAN MAILING LIST -- July 13, 2010
SPECIAL EDITION
JAMES P. HOGAN DIES AT AGE 69
We are saddened to report the passing of James P. Hogan at the age of 69.

Jim was alone at his home in Ireland when he died suddenly yesterday, July 12, 2010.

The precise cause of Jim's death has not yet been determined, nor is the exact time known.

We are in touch with the family and will release further information as it becomes available.

Tim Gleason
Sysadm, JamesPHogan.com
Link: http://www.jamesphogan.com/mailarchive/i...enumber=59

So Migration is his last novel.

I celebrated his skewering of the evolution-gradualism paradigm, and defenses of Intelligent Design, as well as some other daring views, such as the electrical nature of the sun, planets, solar system, etc.

I was dismayed to learn he had recently taken up with a Holocaust denier. Just because you may dispute whether actually as many as six million Jews were put to death by the Nazis, does not mean it is historically sound to deny the Holocaust ever occurred.

His science fiction was very much "hard" sf, with explorations of abundant scientific concepts and imaginative themes. I will miss not being able to look forward to his next novel, wondering what he might come up with next.
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#65
Anne McCaffrey
Sodomia delenda est

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#66
(11-22-2011, 11:57 PM)mv Wrote: Anne McCaffrey

McCaffrey said she can't "remember the name or that of the author — about a woman searching for her son's brain, it had been used for an autopilot on an ore ship and she wanted to find it and give it surcease." It was the story that gave her the inspiration for The Ship Who Sang. I wonder if anyone here ever came across it - i'd certainly like to read it. McCaffrey wrote about how the story could still make her cry.

She was good at evoking tears. I reread her Pern novels often, and every time that poor watchweyr kills itself to follow Lessa's command, I tear up, too.
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#67
Was a great read when I was a teen...

[Image: harry-farewell.jpg]
May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand.
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#68
Teen Schmeen - he is still fun to read.

The Stainless Steel Rat lives!
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#69
Ray Bradbury
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