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Article on Recent Success In Iraq
#1
Concerning the reduction of EFP attacks,we did release those 9 Iranian agents a day or 2 ago,so it seems the Iranians are in a deal with us on this issue.



HERE
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#2
How do you conclude a "deal with Iran"?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#3
Palladin Wrote:Concerning the reduction of EFP attacks,we did release those 9 Iranian agents a day or 2 ago,so it seems the Iranians are in a deal with us on this issue.



HERE
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Well. There is no doubt that the policies of Gen. Petraeus have been a success. To give Sunni muslims an own identity and a real possibility to influence local politics in Iraq was the right move to prevent Al Qaeda from their influence.

The Shia's are afraid of this policy but they have to accept that the Sunni's must be given a proper share of influence in Iraq. The other possibility would be to divide Iraq into three separate states.

/track_snake
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#4
Tell them you won't arm all their malcontents if they stop arming ours would be a starter. We've been talking privately to them since before the invasion.
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#5
The reduction in EFP attacks is mentioned in conjunction with tighter borders. They jump ahead to "mixed signals" and "maybe Iran itself is playing a hand", but what if the borders are simply getting a bit tighter?

If Iran is easing up it seems like it's might possibly be more from Russian influence than U.S..
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#6
Yak,

We can never know for a certainty,but I think a deal has been reached myself. Why,what it involves,I don't know. I don't think we or Iraq can control their border myself.

The reason I think this is our spokepersons have stopped claiming Iran is arming Iraqis and in fact are syaing they are not.
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#7
There's a remote possibility that they could be dealing with the Iraqis directly ...

Quote:Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he was sure Iran's elite Qods force knew about the weapons smuggling and believed top Iranian leaders including Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei were probably aware of it too.

He said he understood that, behind the scenes, the Iranians had given assurances to Iraq that the flow of arms would stop.

"I don't know whether to believe them. I'll wait and see," Gates said.

... or we might have simply told them we were going to bomb the sh*t out of the machine shop that makes the copper plates. Not as sexy as taking out nuke facilities, but the odds of success are probably 100% better.

... or sombody is committing treason.
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#8
Alright. Here,we have a measuring stick for success in Iraq. Nothing the DoD could use on a graph chart,but extremely important. More important than anything they could put on a chart,IMO.

This shows 2 important facts about Iraq's culture and situation:

1)Christians are Iraq's "canary birds in the mine"

2)Non Christian Iraqis of good will want their Christians back because it seems to show IF the Christians remain,the Sunnis and Shiites can live together. The fact these Muslims feel safe to make this public appeal speaks volumes about the rest of Muslims at least in Baghdad.

Here is a case of nationalism over riding differences to glue a people together. It is in the best interests of them all to live&work together. This here is a great story and not only about the war effort.



HERE
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#9
Palladin Wrote:Alright. Here,we have a measuring stick for success in Iraq. Nothing the DoD could use on a graph chart,but extremely important. More important than anything they could put on a chart,IMO.

This shows 2 important facts about Iraq's culture and situation:

1)Christians are Iraq's "canary birds in the mine"

2)Non Christian Iraqis of good will want their Christians back because it seems to show IF the Christians remain,the Sunnis and Shiites can live together. The fact these Muslims feel safe to make this public appeal speaks volumes about the rest of Muslims at least in Baghdad.

Here is a case of nationalism over riding differences to glue a people together. It is in the best interests of them all to live&work together. This here is a great story and not only about the war effort.



HERE
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Well... Quite possible that you are right... Remember that during the Saddam era the Christian minority in Iraq fared rather well. Even in Saddam's cabinet, the post of the foreign minister was held by a Christian, Tareq Aziz.

I don't know of the fate now for Mr. Aziz but I hope he is doing well even if he still is in American detention.

/track_snake
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#10
I never read where Saddam persecuted the Christians,so I agree with you on that. Concerning Mr. Aziz,I never agreed with his detention.

Certainly he should not be in our purview now,if he is held it should be by the Iraqis. Don't know his true status honestly.
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#11
Here's another story you won't see in the MSM, Come Home
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#12
WarBicycle Wrote:Here's another story you won't see in the MSM, Come Home

Isn't that wonderful?! This shows everyone that it was mostly the foreign Islamic terrorists, who were attacking the Iraqi Christians.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#13
And the Shiites, al Qaeda is Suni.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#14
John L Wrote:
WarBicycle Wrote:Here's another story you won't see in the MSM, Come Home

Isn't that wonderful?! This shows everyone that it was mostly the foreign Islamic terrorists, who were attacking the Iraqi Christians.
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Well... After the 2003 invasion, it was created an environment that was hostile to Christians in Iraq. Many of the Iraqi Christians found it better to leave if they could. Those who remained in Iraq were afraid to visit their churches.

Now, with a growing awareness among Iraqi Sunni Muslims that Al Qaeda is not the only possible alternative and that Shiites seem to become less radical the Iraqi Christians want to come home.

Let us hope that this change in climate in Iraq will continue.

/track_snake
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#15
HERE
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#16
HERE
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#17
Palladin Wrote:HERE
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Well...

Most of the foreign insurgents are coming from Saudi Arabia, the closest ally of US in the region....

It is also natural against the background that Saudi Arabia is dominated by Sunni Muslims, many of those who think that the Sunnis in Iraq are being unfairly treated since the fall of Saddam.

This is again showing the importance of giving Sunni Muslims a greater role to play in Iraq and that such policy should be a cornerstone in the US strategy for the future Iraq. Yes, that is at the expense of Shia muslim influence in Iraq, but it needs to be so. I never could understand how the US could support a Shia dominance in Iraq knowing the close ties between Shia muslims in Iraq and Iran....

/track_snake
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#18
Trackster,

Take our vantage point to see why. Until recently,the Sunni were responsible for 95% of our casualties,95% of the civilian casualties and the shiite made up 80% of the ARAB population,Sunni made up 20% of it.

Can you honestly say you would have deferred to the Sunni in that paradigm? Come on Track,we and they have changed due to circumstances,sometimes human events are changed by circumstances.
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#19
Palladin,

Sunni is about 30-35% of the Iraqi population. To give them just 5% of the post-Saddam influence in Iraq when they had say 80% before the fall of Saddam was inappropriate.

But now the policy has changed and let us hope that we will see a fair distribution of power in the future Iraq.

/track_snake
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#20
Patrick's first "Here" tells us

Quote:Saudis accounted for the largest number of fighters listed on the records by far — 305, or 41 percent — American intelligence officers found as they combed through documents and computers in the weeks after the raid. The data show that despite increased efforts by Saudi Arabia to clamp down on would-be terrorists since Sept. 11, 2001, when 15 of the 19 hijackers were Saudi, some Saudi fighters are still getting through.

Libyans accounted for 137 foreign fighters, or 18 percent of the total, the senior American military officials said. They discussed the raid with the stipulation that they not be named because of the delicate nature of the issue.

No wonder obtaining cooperation from above states is difficult. It relieves a great deal of pressure on their own tyrants, and allows the malcontents to go elsewhere in order to display their "displaced aggressive" tendencies. Good strategy, don't you think?

As the former Agriculture Secretary under President Ford, Earl Butz, once stated, "You no play Da Game, You No makey De Rules". He lost his job over that joke and some others, BTY.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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