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Introductions thread
#61
Well, whenever I have a little anxiety attack about all the impending troubles we face (NBC attack and warfare, giant earthquakes, global warming, resource depletion, viral outbreak, et. al.), I think back to something I read years and years ago. It was the prologue to Harry Harrison's Make Room! Make Room! (what the movie "Soylent Green" was based off of).

The book was published in 1967 and it made the following claim (paraphrasing here): "At our current rate of consumption, by 1990 the United States will require over 130% of the worlds resources in order to maintain its current standard of living." Knowing that this is mathematically impossible, it sounded like a pretty doomsday-ish scenario.

I have since come to realize that these types of alarmist attitudes are overs-sensationalized to garner attention by playing on people's basest fears. However, I am no Star Trek Utopian either. As usual, the truth seems to lie somewhere in the middle. S5
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#62
Seabird Wrote:Well, whenever I have a little anxiety attack about all the impending troubles we face (NBC attack and warfare, giant earthquakes, global warming, resource depletion, viral outbreak, et. al.), I think back to something I read years and years ago. It was the prologue to Harry Harrison's Make Room! Make Room! (what the movie "Soylent Green" was based off of).

The book was published in 1967 and it made the following claim (paraphrasing here): "At our current rate of consumption, by 1990 the United States will require over 130% of the worlds resources in order to maintain its current standard of living." Knowing that this is mathematically impossible, it sounded like a pretty doomsday-ish scenario.

Yeah, I think that Paul Ehrlich must have been reading this novel one day while he was high and decided to turn fiction into future fact. And he is always talked of as a pure genius. Go figure.

Just think what trouble he could have caused had he bothered to read the "Death World" series? Wink1
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#63
I regard Paul Erlich as one of the preeminent satirists of our times. S6
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#64
Seabird Wrote:I regard Paul Erlich as one of the preeminent satirists of our times. S6

you are a most generous fellow, you know that. That's what I like about you and why I invited you here. S6 Wink1
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#65
I'm a new guy (girl), too. I'm jealous of your post and hope to have you keep me sane.......S1
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#66
Feel free to give us some bio of yourself if you don't mind. And you are a female, ritht? If so, great! My name is of course, John. The others will be happy to introduce themselves. S1
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#67
Wilkommen, Frau Solo.

Feel free to jump right in some wanton discussion. S1
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#68
SoloNav Wrote:I'm a new guy (girl), too. I'm jealous of your post and hope to have you keep me sane.......S1

There's girls here???? Shock


oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy!
:twisted:
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#69
Speaking of the fairer sex, Cleo hasn't been here for a couple of months. You weren't here then. She's a real trooper, and could handle the boys without breaking into a sweat.

Our new member is a councelor, so she has seen most of it all before. Try not to be a barbarian, if possible. And watch out for your avatars. Wink1
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#70
I think the forum has done a good job of keeping those type of folks away from the gates, John. Wink1

Speaking of which, you haven't seen our little "hannibal" try to re-register again lately have you?

There is almost nothing that will make me give up my Mickey Mouse Che Guevara. You can have it when you take it out of my cold dead computer... :?

Solo, what are you a counselor for?
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#71
Why John, I am shocked. What it the world would ever lead you to believe that I could act in anything but a less than civilized manner? S6
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#72
Hi. New guy here.

When I was 8 years old, I have joined a communist youth organization with 99% of other children of my age. At that time I have given my word of honor that I will

-study and work hard and that I will be a good comrade
-love my country, self-ruling Socialist Federate Republic of Yugoslavia
-spread brotherhood and unity and ideas for which Tito fought
-appreciate all people of this world who seek freedom and peace

One out of four that I still follow today is not bad. You may call me a hypocrite or think about me as someone who has learned (partially at least) to use his own mind. In memory of that generation my user name is Child of Socialism, COS for short.

I climb mountains, grow hissing cockroaches, work on my PhD and I am late for dinner.

Hmmm... spell checker attached. Nice.
Ščepec slaščic za mišičaste pešce s stičišča cestišč.
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#73
HI COS! Great to see you here! Somehow I was afraid that you might not take me up on the invitation, but you are constantly surprising me. Why am I NOT surprised? S6

Anyway, if you will note, there are a lot of nice little subjects that you will find to enjoy your serious scrutiny. If you have any questions, please feel free to let me know. I'm more than certain that you will find a lot of new friends here to help keep you involved.

Later! S6
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#74
Welcome COS. Good to see some people filtering over from IAP!
[Image: SalmaHayekcopy.jpg]
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#75
how do, COS...

glad to have you aboard.
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#76
COS Wrote:Hi. New guy here.

When I was 8 years old, I have joined a communist youth organization with 99% of other children of my age. At that time I have given my word of honor that I will

-study and work hard and that I will be a good comrade
-love my country, self-ruling Socialist Federate Republic of Yugoslavia
-spread brotherhood and unity and ideas for which Tito fought
-appreciate all people of this world who seek freedom and peace

One out of four that I still follow today is not bad. You may call me a hypocrite or think about me as someone who has learned (partially at least) to use his own mind. In memory of that generation my user name is Child of Socialism, COS for short.

I climb mountains, grow hissing cockroaches, work on my PhD and I am late for dinner.

Hmmm... spell checker attached. Nice.

Things change, beliefs change, times change - most importantly, people change. To change isn't to be a real hypocrite in a sense. We all understand if a person's beliefs change over time or due to something in their lives.

What area is the PhD you are working for, in?

What does your signature mean?

Anyhow, welcome to the forum. 8)
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#77
Gunnen4u Wrote:What area is the PhD you are working for, in?

What does your signature mean?

Comparative genomics, computer work. Signature is a tongue twister, too many jumps from csz to čšž can really produce saliva. It means "A pinch of candies for muscular walkers from the crossing of roads".
Ščepec slaščic za mišičaste pešce s stičišča cestišč.
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#78
BTY COS, if you get tired of the 'spell checker', just go to your "profile", scroll down about 2/3 of the way to the bottom, and you can turn it off. S6
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#79
Well, I never really introduced myself here - but now, as I begin the phase into military retirement after 21 years of active service, seems as appropriate a time as any.

I started in Reagan's Army, facing the "disgusting" Empire, as an artilleryman. I spent two years of that on an isolated nuclear arty detachment in Turkey, with the mission of nuking the Straits should the Soviets attempt to seize control of them in an amphibious assault. Hard to picture that in hindsight.

I learned Turkish while I was there and developed a deep interest in that part of the world – I switched over to the Military Intelligence field when it came time to re-up, and that’s what I’ve been doing ever since. I’ve worked the Middle East my entire MI career and speak Turkish, Arabic and Kurdish – in descending order of fluency.

I was lucky enough to spend my early years in MI with SOF and working with a number of Vietnam and Lebanon vets, who really put a lot of pressure on me to perform. Those days have heavily influenced everything I've done since.

About a year after coming into this new field, I found myself in Saudi Arabia prepping for Gulf War I - being launched into Kuwait City very early. Initial euphoria at being greeted like the liberators of Paris disappeared quickly when we witnessed the return of Sabah thugs to crush political dissent amongst people who truly believed they'd been completely liberated.

I ended up being shot up north for the early stages of Provide Comfort. Elements of the Turkish Army were doing things to some of the desperate Kurds along the border that sickened me. But we rapidly build up, and despite a number of glitches in the huge effort, I believe we carried it off very well. Over the next few years, I ended up spending a cumulative 2 years in northern Iraq; broken up into 6 month rotations. The mission was definitely the ultimate in good intent, but I still left with a bad taste in my mouth due to the actions of the Turks within the MCC in Zakho and during their several cross-border incursions over the years. The final ignominous end to Provide Comfort in '96 does not even bear discussion - the Agency guys in-country behaved disgracefully and the military not much better. We all abandoned those we'd been working with for years - many to be executed, others to gather in panic at the border and then to be sifted through Guam to settle in the US. (I met a couple of Kurds I knew from that time when I was in Baghdad for OIF, working for us again.)

I bounced in and out of a number of other countries in the region throughout the years, but always came back to Iraq, Turkey, and the Kurds. Operation Southern Watch continued, and Provide Comfort transitioned into Northern Watch. I was lucky enough to be selected to work with UNSCOM on a Biological Warfare Inspection Team, which gave me a first hand appreciation of the obstructionist actions of Saddam's regime, as well as really opening my eyes to the absolutely incompetent way that the UN was gathering information. They had some great people working for them, but the information was not collected, screened, prioritized, analyzed and reported in any manner approaching a professional level. Everything was ad hoc, and the mission suffered greatly because of it. But it paid very well - plus they flew me out and back first class. GIs don't often get that kind of treatment.

Most of that period I was working out of Ft. Bragg, NC – but I did spend a fantastic 3 years stationed in Germany. I deployed out of that place into the Middle East, just like I have from every other location I’ve been assigned, but I did have the opportunity to work a bit with the Germans and Dutch while I was there.

Finally, after nearly a decade of rarely being at home, I decided to give my family a break and took an assignment at the Defense Language Institute pushing Army trainees through the Arabic course. The hours were long, but I went home every night. While busy with all that, I was feeling kind of cut off from the HUMINT field – DLI is under the influence of the NSA mafia, and most of the cadre are of the SIGINT persuasion. So, I undertook to get certified as a Mediator, and then spent a great deal of my free time there working as a volunteer mediator, and ultimately a trainer, for the local Victim-Offender Mediation Program. That was an interesting experience.

My last operational assignment was with a small unit conducting terrorism vulnerability assessments in the CENTCOM AOR. I spent most of my time in Iraq, but did get around to some of the rest of the CENTCOM AOR.

I returned to DLI to retire. I love my job, and it has given me a lot of great opportunities, but its time for something different. Mixed feelings, yes - but committed to the change.

That's me. My views on various topics are best ascertained by the manner in which I post on the board.
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#80
Jedburgh, you know, it is a big honor to be able to discuss with you, John, Ken and many others here. Shock Even just reading most posts here gives a boost to support more actively the good side on other forums and such.
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