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Archaeological Finds in Retreating Swiss Glacier
#21
You mean to tell me that ocean currents are not that important? And are you stating that the warmer Pacific ocean would not add to the warmth of the Atlantic? You have got to be kidding, right?
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"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#22
John L Wrote:You mean to tell me that ocean currents are not that important? And are you stating that the warmer Pacific ocean would not add to the warmth of the Atlantic? You have got to be kidding, right?
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No, I am not kidding.

Your evaluation of the importance of the Isthmus is exagerrated...

There is plenty of warm water in the Atlantic too. Even if the water in the Pacific is slightly warmer, it is far from being an explanation for the glaciations in Pleistocene.

There are other factors that are more important; lower levels of some greenhouse gasses, decreased solar radiation and volcanic eruptions may be some.

/track_snake
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#23
There are many factor involved John. You can't point to the creation of the Central American Isthmus and declare that the cause, as track_snake rightly points out, and you yourself bang this drum endlessly, it is all primarily down to variations in solar forcings related to the Croll - Milankovitch cycle, coupled with certain amplifiers (the part you omit).

The creation of the Isthmus no doubt caused changes in circulation, and possibly a fall in North Atlantic sea temperatures, but it wouldn't account for the formation of ice at the southern pole, ice accumulations occurred at both poles from around the same time.

Dr. Maasch's hypothesis is that mountain uplift, the collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates and the rise of the Himalayas, lead to increased erosion and chemical weathering of silicate rocks, and consequently the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This reduction in the greenhouse effect brought on a period of global cooling. At least this hypothesis would have a global effect.

But it is much more likely that the present period of glaciation was the result of a conjunction of many factors. It is impossible to cite one as more important; there is no smoking gun.
"Common sense is not so common" - Voltaire
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#24
Monsieur Le Tonk Wrote:There are many factor involved John. You can't point to the creation of the Central American Isthmus and declare that the cause, as track_snake rightly points out, and you yourself bang this drum endlessly, it is all primarily down to variations in solar forcings related to the Croll - Milankovitch cycle, coupled with certain amplifiers (the part you omit).

The creation of the Isthmus no doubt caused changes in circulation, and possibly a fall in North Atlantic sea temperatures, but it wouldn't account for the formation of ice at the southern pole, ice accumulations occurred at both poles from around the same time.

Dr. Maasch's hypothesis is that mountain uplift, the collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates and the rise of the Himalayas, lead to increased erosion and chemical weathering of silicate rocks, and consequently the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This reduction in the greenhouse effect brought on a period of global cooling. At least this hypothesis would have a global effect.

But it is much more likely that the present period of glaciation was the result of a conjunction of many factors. It is impossible to cite one as more important; there is no smoking gun.
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Yes. There is no clear 'smoking gun'.

The theory of Dr. Maasch seems also to be easily questioned. There are many more reasons why CO2 in the atmosphere can vary - most notably the equilibrium between CO2 in the oceans and in the atmosphere is not very exact. If the oceans accumulate more CO2, the atmospheric content is likely to go down.

But as you all know, CO2 is not the only greenhouse gas. Variations in methane levels can easily give much bigger contributions to temperature change, as well as variations in water vapor.

Greenhouse gasses may have been the culprit but probably not in the way Dr. Maasch thinks....

/track_snake
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