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1 Terabyte Hard Drives are on the way!
#1
To many younger people, this may be interesting, but not so astounding. However, my first computer was a Pentium 75, with 1.1 gigabyte hard drive, when a 2 gigabyte was the state of the art. And that was in 1995, just before Windows 95 came out. Amazing!

We have come a long way in just 11 years. Wink1

And right around Thanksgiving, I purchased a 300 gig HD for only $57, at Frys.com. And that included S/H as well. But what is so interesting is that until lately, hard drives routinely came with 4megabytes of cache, or perhaps 8 megabytes. Well, that one has 16 megabytes, and the newer ones will have 32 megabytes. That is enough cache to make things really hum along nicely.


Quote:Hitachi Introduces 1-Terabyte Hard Drive
Colossal storage reaches new milestone with a drive that holds 1000 gigabytes.
Melissa J. Perenson, PC World
Thursday, January 04, 2007 09:00 PM PST

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies is first to the mat with an announcement of a 1-terabyte hard disk drive. Industry analysts widely expected a 1TB drive to ship sometime in 2007; Hitachi grabbed a head start on the competition by announcing its drive today, just before the largest U.S. consumer electronics show starts next week.

According to Hitachi, the drive ships in the first quarter of 2007, and will cost $399--less than the price of two individual 500GB hard drives today. The drive, called the Deskstar 7K1000, will be shown this weekend in Las Vegas at the 2007 International CES, also known as the Consumer Electronics Show, as well as at the Storage Visions storage conference.


Hitachi will have three flavors of the 1TB drive; however, only the Deskstar version will be available at launch. The company also plans to offer a CinemaStar version of the drive, for use in DVR and set-top boxes, as well as an enterprise version with a certified mean time between failure rating. Both of those versions are expected in the second quarter of this year.
Industry Milestone

"No question, it's a milestone for the industry," says John Rydning, research manager for hard disk drives and components at IDC. "It's interesting that the industry is delivering a 1TB drive in the 51st year of the industry." The first hard drive, manufactured by IBM, shipped in 1956.

Hitachi notes it took the industry 35 years to reach 1GB (in 1991), 14 years more to reach 500GB (in 2005), and just two more years to reach 1TB.

The company hopes to be the first to market with a 1TB drive. The company is locked in competition with Seagate for those honors; Seagate reconfirmed its intentions to ship a 1TB drive in the first half of 2007, but it has not offered any further details.
Drive Details

Although the jump to 1TB was not unexpected, Hitachi is taking a cautious tactic to achieving 1TB. According to Doug Pickford, director of market and product strategy, "The approach we've taken with the design of this product, and with previous generation products, is that we've purposely relaxed the areal density. The previous generation [500GB] drive was 100GB per platter; and, it was possible to have up to 160GB per platter. About 250GB per platter is the next bump on the areal density curve, but we've backed off from doing that in order to achieve higher reliability at this time."


The Deskstar 7K1000 will be a five-platter drive, each platter capable of storing 200GB apiece. Like Seagate's Barracuda 7200.10 750GB drive, Hitachi's 1TB model uses perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) to achieve its high capacity point. The 7K1000 is Hitachi's first 3.5-inch hard drive to use PMR technology; last year, the company released 2.5-inch PMR-based hard drives.

Pickford says the drive will be intended for gaming and high-performance PCs, external storage devices, and PC upgrades. "The drive will be shipping in the first quarter to retail stores," says Pickford. "And we're expecting to ship some to external storage device makers as well."

The 7200 rpm Serial-ATA drive will have 32MB data buffer, larger than the typical 8MB or 16MB buffer seen on drives. It will be available in SATA 3.0Gb/s and Parallel-ATA 133 interfaces.
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#2
LOL! John, I'm younger than you are and my first computer didn't even have a HD. It booted off of a floppy and everything loaded into RAM to run. Programs all ran on seperate diskettes. S5
"Most people just want tomorrow to look pretty much like today." - Terry Pratchett
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#3
We're headed for virtual reality. We'll have our forums in a virtual wrestling ring. Shock The libs don't want that. :twisted:
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#4
Quote:LOL! John, I'm younger than you are and my first computer didn't even have a HD. It booted off of a floppy and everything loaded into RAM to run. Programs all ran on seperate diskettes.
I had one with "datasette". The old tapes, before invention of CD's. If you played them on a normal tape recorder, sounded like fax signals. Loading one of the very old 2D Tennis games took about five minutes. East German model, a lot weaker than Commodore 64. Run on Basic or Pascal or so.
1990 my quantum leap. 284'er processor, 20MB HD, 3 1/2 diskette, MSDOS. About $2,500 back then. For example, I have this HUGE music collection on HD. will the time come, when I can expect to be able to house it on an online site, where it will be safe from crash, erasure, theft, or even fire? I'm curious about this. I have thousands of dollars worth of music.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#5
Seabird Wrote:LOL! John, I'm younger than you are and my first computer didn't even have a HD. It booted off of a floppy and everything loaded into RAM to run. Programs all ran on seperate diskettes. S5

Look, I was 50 before purchasing my first one, ok? I forget that all you young geeks were doing this as crumb snatchers. Wink1 You'll just have to give me some slack here.

However, back to the subject on hand, what about this quantum leap in storage? And what does the future look like for it? Will Moores Law continue to show a doubling of technology in 18 months? What will be the next form of data storage, if it is becoming so cheap?

Another thing: now that storage is so cheap, does this give a Huge boost for online storage?
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#6
John L Wrote:However, back to the subject on hand, what about this quantum leap in storage? And what does the future look like for it? Will Moores Law continue to show a doubling of technology in 18 months? What will be the next form of data storage, if it is becoming so cheap?

Another thing: now that storage is so cheap, does this give a Huge boost for online storage?

My professional opininon? Nonvolatile flash RAM is the future of data storage. One of the current bottlenecks in local data storage and transfer performance is the mechanical nature magnetic disk hard drives. As NVF-RAM continues to advance in size and reliability, I think they will eventually replace traditional HDs in everything but the most demanding of storage solutions.

As for the inception of off-site, online storage, it came and went already - though I think it will be back. It was a darling concept of the Dot Com Era. Some startups were even taking the idea one step further by trying to develop online application delivery. Say, instead of launching your MS Word locally on your machine, you would log into your online service and request a temporary license to utilize their word processor over the wire.

Another interesting concept for off-site storage is the implication for data security and the countervailing conceit of the traditional IT community of open-source infomation. It's an interesting paradigm that Neal Stephenson explored in a wonderful book called Cryptonomicon. I HIGHLY recommend it to any fans of technical fiction.
"Most people just want tomorrow to look pretty much like today." - Terry Pratchett
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#7
Here is the latest memory technology advance.

Quote:New Server Chips Quadruple Memory Capacity
Startup Metaram has developed a technique to pack more RAM onto a memory module.
Agam Shah

Startup company Metaram on Monday is expected to announce technology that overcomes traditional server memory limitations and allows users to quadruple memory without adding new hardware.

Targeted at servers, the MetaSDRAM chipset sits between the DRAM module and a memory controller, processing commands and manipulating the controller to allow the system to have up to four times more memory.

The capability of Metaram's chipset to read the additional memory means memory makers can pack more RAM on a memory module, overcoming limitations that typically throttle the amount of memory that can fit in servers.

For example, an 8-socket x86 server is limited to 256G bits of RAM, but MetaSDRAM chipsets quadruple that to 1T byte of RAM.

"That allows the system to overcome traditional limitations to read the additional RAM on a [memory module]," said Jeremy Werner, senior manager of marketing at Metaram.

The ability to plug four times the memory into a slot on a motherboard is very attractive and allows servers to perform better, said Nathan Brookwood, an analyst at Insight 64. "If you can put a terabyte of memory in a system, your entire Oracle database can sit in the memory. That's a rocket booster," Brookwood said.

It also results in cost savings, Brookwood said. Users can add four times the memory capacity without adding CPUs, he said.

Memory manufacturers can plug the chipset on existing memory modules, according to the company. Hynix and Smart Modular Technologies are supplying the technologies in the memory modules, according to Metaram.

Metaram is shipping separate chips that can help double and quadruple the DRAM capacity of memory modules. The MetaSDRAM MR08G2 chip, which helps double the capacity of memory modules, is available to memory makers for US$200 in quantities of 1,000. Metaram did not share pricing information on the chipsets that quadruple memory. The chips are compatible with Advanced Micro Devices- and Intel-based x86 systems, Metaram said.

With the MetaSDRAM chips, Metaram has found a way for users to fit memory modules into existing infrastructure that users can adopt quickly, Brookwood said. This follows the rationale of Fred Weber, one of the founders of Metaram and former chief technology officer for Advanced Micro Devices.

"It reflects the same design philosophy when AMD came up with their Opteron boxes," Brookwood said. "Intel said x86 couldn't do 64-bits, but Weber said that the problem with Itanium is it doesn't fit into existing infrastructure," Brookwood said. Weber and AMD figured out how to fit the 64-bit architecture into chips that could be implemented into existing infrastructure, Brookwood said.

While Metaram's technology overcomes bottlenecks facing traditional system architecture, it could have its limits, analysts said.

"It is not a revolutionary product, but it is a novel way to handle additional memory," said Will Strauss, principal analyst at Forward Concepts. PCs and servers support only limited memory today, and this product will be effective until new PC designs are introduced in the future, he said.
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#8
I was in one of the Vegas Apple stores today, and saw an ad for the latest 3 TByte Macs. Memory is cheap, and only getting better.
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#9
WmLambert Wrote:I was in one of the Vegas Apple stores today, and saw an ad for the latest 3 TByte Macs. Memory is cheap, and only getting better.

Memory is simply running away with things. I have several 300 gig hard drives(one internal, two external), and they are still far from full. It is finally getting to the point where I will not have to worry about Mp3, and just go with Wave files for my music.

I really don't have any intent on getting a 1 TByte hard drive soon. They will most likely wear out before filling up. Best to get two 500 gigs instead, and use one for backup.
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#10
I was an operator maintainer in naval communications; we used large mainframe computers to encrypt/decrypt message traffic. The first PC I used was when I was posted ashore in 1981, I don't remember the model just remember it was an IBM computer. There was no Internet in those days; I considered it a useless toy. One of the Captains I worked paid about $75 for a subscription to a news service for his computer. News text would be received on his printer at 75 baud, which was slow considering the computers we used onboard ship would print a page of text 30 seconds—slow by today’s standards. I purchased an IBM 486 in late 1989, but quickly gave it to my stepdaughter because I had little use for it. I only became interested in computers when browsers became available.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#11
John L Wrote:[size=15]To many younger people, this may be interesting, but not so astounding. However, my first computer was a Pentium 75, with 1.1 gigabyte hard drive, when a 2 gigabyte was the state of the art. And that was in 1995, just before Windows 95 came out.

Did not know you are this young.

My first computer was IBM PC, 8088, without a hard drive....they did not exist yet. :lol:
Sodomia Delenda Est

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#12
My first computer was a Heathkit H-8 24K computer that I built from the circuit board up. It took three days to build - but the monitor took up two of those days. There's nothing in computers other than resisters, diodes, capacitors, and a few chips... and learning to make good solder connections.

Some of the <24K programs I had to write seemed huge at the time, but got the job done. The programs back then were written by those who needed to use them, so were straight-forward and useful. Today, most programs are written by techs with no useful knowledge of the end product, so we get the sausage-stuffing along with the sausage. The hardest thing was synching up the tape recorder to transmit the audio pulses of the programming. This, of course, was a quantum leap above the old punch cards that many mainframes required.
[Image: foldspindleib3.jpg]
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#13
Q Wrote:I have thousands of dollars worth of music
East German music???!
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#14
Fredledingue Wrote:
Q Wrote:I have thousands of dollars worth of music
East German music???!
I never wrote the last 3 sentences. Probably a joke of one of the mods.

The Frauenhofer people in Munich hope to market crystaline, optical storage media within five years. Capacity about 1,000 times higher than magnetic disks.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#15
Seabird Wrote:LOL! John, I'm younger than you are and my first computer didn't even have a HD. It booted off of a floppy and everything loaded into RAM to run. Programs all ran on seperate diskettes. S5

As an aside, I think that I worked on one of the first few thousand IBM PCs ever produced. The reason I believe so is that I was charged with 'upgrading' it to a mighty 286 which involved a BIOS upgrade as well as the uP. I bought all the required components ... and then to my horror when I opened it up the BIOS chip was soldered in rather than socketed (why the hell would anyone EVER need to upgrade the BIOS??). I also remember a "power user" back in the day that had a machine with a "Winchester Harddrive' with an unheard of 10Meg capacity! Also worked with a GenRad 2270 ICT (In circuit tester) using a VAX that used 12" disks the size of small wedding cakes on the same job.

I like the small passport drives that run off USB without having to lug around an extra power supply ... tons of portable memory and fairly cheap too!
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#16
My first computer had a tape drive, and I purchased my first floppy drive about 6 months later. That was an Atari 800. I had a few Commodore 64's between then and my first PC. My first PC, which I got as a graduation present in 1988, had a 20 MB hard drive and a monochrome monitor. The 20 MB hard drive was billed as being larger than any home or small business user could possibly use up. These days I routinely work with files considerably larger than that both at work and at home. The monochrome monitor was a step backwards for me since I had been used to a color display with my previous computers.

<And I walked up hill in the snow both to and from school. You can do that in West Virginia by the way.>
DavidR
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#17
Oh yeah? ... just lemme tell ya about punch cards! :lol:
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#18
My first computer was a Commodore Vic-20.
It's processor ran at 1.0227 MHz. Note thats MHz not GHz.
16 Kb ROM (read only memory), 5 Kb RAM, no HD.
A tape drive that used cassette tapes was available for storage.
Later, I got the Commodore C-64. It had a whopping 64 Kb of RAM. A 5 1/4" floppy drive was available.
Different eyes see different things. Different hearts beat on different strings.
But there are times for you and me when all such things agree.
-Geddy Lee, Rush.
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#19
I was deprived. My first computer was a Packard Bell 386. After a year the hard drive fried itself. That is when we learned that they couldn't be upgraded. We've had home built ever since.
As Gary Lloyd said, "When the government’s boot is on your throat, whether it is a left boot or a right boot is of no consequence."
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#20
I had my first computer very young, so that one didn't have internet... in fact it was one of those 80's computers... A Tandy brand computer, with floppy disks, etc. It could only let me use ms paint, wordpad, and play pixelly dos games. oh, and the color on the thing was very limited... it literally only showed 5 colors, and didn't allow for varying different shades.

In a way it was sort of embarrassing, as seeing at the time it was the 90's, and there was already other better, upgraded computers out there. But my mom was a little bit of an cheap-ass at the time, and decided to get me a used, older PC instead.

But seeing that I was like 7 at the time, I figured I couldn't complain too much... and plus I could play Oregon trail and other classic floppy disks on it.

I did become sick of it though when I became an teenager, and wanted to play the latest PC games that I simply couldn't run at all on my old pc. That's when I got an Dell for Christmas. That was actually the same Dell I kept on upgrading and using the whole time before I got my latest and most current PC.
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
relax. it's only the internet!
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