Poll: Will Saddam be convicted?
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French Lawyer to Defend Saddam
#21
Quote:Is the above good enough answer to your inquiry?

It helps a lot, thank you! I like your description:

Quote:Al Sadir took advantage of few ones who are home, unemployed, and have so much energy not knowing what t do with it, all he did was give them weapons, cigarettes and food, may be some pocket money too

If I may, just one more question. Debka (which is sometimes right and sometimes wrong) wrote today:

Quote:named the Mosul-born former Maj.-Gen Mohammed Abdullah Shehwani, 57, recently appointed to head Iraq’s National Intelligence Service, as the man Washington has secretly tipped as Iraq’s future ruler. His Director of Operations will be a Jalal Talabani loyalist, United Kurdish Party intelligence chief, Kosart Rasul, who led the Americans to Saddam Hussein’s hidey hole in December 2003. To further strengthen the hierarchy-in-waiting, the US administration in Baghdad named three new heads for Iraq’s armed forces: Gen. Baker al-Zibari, 56, a Kurd, to be senior defense adviser to the caretaker government and liaison between government and army; Gen. Amer al-Hashemi, 58, a Sunni, as chief of staff and a Shiite, Lt-Gen. Daham al-Assal, 63, as his deputy.

Do you know anything about the presumed new leader, Mohammed Abdullah Shehwani?
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#22
I know of Barazani as a Kurdish leader for the Kurds independence and remember him from the 70s.
Zibari is a Talaban's relative (not related to the Talibans in Afghnistan at all, it's just a last name), Zibari is a snsible guy, I don't mind him, but who is this Shahwani person?
I never heard of his last name before,
Please educate me here!
Umhasan, a free Iraqi woman
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#23
Quote:but who is this Shahwani person?
I never heard of his last name before,

No idea: this is why I've asked you :!: . I'll see what I can dig up.

///

OK, here is a little info:

From Asia Times, Nov 2003:

Quote:"One of the biggest mistakes of the coalition forces was to dissolve the army and the security forces," Brigadier-General Mohammed Abdullah Shahwani told Inter Press Service in Baghdad. Shahwani left Iraq in 1990 and became a part of Washington's covert efforts to topple Saddam Hussein.

"We had a good intelligence network [then]," he said. "They knew everybody, they knew the criminals. But they went home. Nobody can do it anymore. If you start from the beginning, you need time."

Similar account from VOA:

Quote:General Muhammad Abdullah al-Shahwani fled Iraq in 1990 and has spent the past 12 years helping U.S. intelligence officials draft plans to topple Hussein. He says even Iraqis like himself who feel no loyalty toward Hussein are unhappy with the U.S. decision to purge so many military and security officials.

"We had a good Iraqi intelligence network. They knew everybody," he said. "They knew all the criminals. They knew the areas. [Now they have gone] home. Nobody can do it anymore. If you want to start from [scratch], you need time. I think the [coalition forces] have to call back all the police, except the special intelligence [groups] like the Mukhabarat [secret police]."

Al-Shahwani says the U.S. decision to dissolve the security apparatus has left Iraq vulnerable to a massive influx of foreign terrorists across its underguarded borders.

Even more dangerous, he says, is the risk that military and security officials disenfranchised by the coalition may now join forces with such terrorists in search of income or simply out of a desire for revenge.

The combination of terrorist aims and Iraqi know-how, says al-Shahwani, could prove even more deadly for coalition troops already coming under regular attack.

"They came to the army to make a living. They had a contract with the Iraqi government. Somebody came and canceled the contract. How are they going to live? Most of them, maybe, if they have an opportunity, will join any of these terrorist organizations."

So he is an ex-Saddam general, who wants to restore some of Saddam security and was arguing for it back last fall. Apparently, now he was listened to (Bremer said that he is rehiring some BAATH people.)

In this August 2003 article, he is listed as one of the contacts with Saddam's officers that helped to convince them not to fight.

Quote:Among the central players, people involved said, were Mr. Bruner, the former C.I.A. officer working on behalf of an influential Iraqi-American businessman named Saad al-Janabi; Mr. Alawi, now a member of Iraq's nine-member provisional leadership council; and Muhammad Abdullah Shahwani, a former Iraqi general and a principal player in an unsuccessful C.I.A.-backed coup against Mr. Hussein in 1996.

What may be happening is that since IGC does not seem to be able to control the situation, Shahwani is given a chance to set up things his way.
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#24
Hi Sweden,

Welcome aboard the forum. Please feel free to jump right in and let us know what you think here. We'll try not to bite....................too hard!
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#25
There is a certain need for emotional "closure," especially for families of Saddam's victims, to the Saddam era that will be served by putting Saddam on trial. But when it comes to punishment, he should simply be executed in the quickest, most humane way. You cannot possibly make him suffer as much as he deserves to suffer. He cannot be made to die hundreds of thousands of times. The best thing we can do is remove his corrupting evil influence from the earth, so the planet can be to that extent cleansed.
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#26
Thanks Sweden,
Ron, we may not be able to kill Saddam 100 times but execution is not a good idea for his end. Iraqis are not gona like that.
Umhasan, a free Iraqi woman
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