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Great success of the "International Justice"
#1
Slobodan Milosevic, RIP.

[Image: 180px-Smilo.jpg]

Debka Wrote:Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic dies in his cell in the The Hague early Saturday, apparently of a heart attack

Milosevic repeatedly requested transfer to Moscow for treatment of his high blood pressure condition. His trial on allegations of war crimes and genocide in the Balkan War before the International War Crimes Court in The Hague lasted four years without a conviction.

Last Sunday, Serbian Croat Milan Babic, accused of ethnic cleansing, committed suicide in the same prison.
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#2
May the taxpayers also join the party? Some dollars have been saved. (but will probably just be reallocted S7 )
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#3
No comments..., if russian language isn't recommended to use here...
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#4
You mean that English is too limited to express the depth of emotions? Wink1

It has some 4-letter words....

Oh well, let me state that I'm deeply pissed off (censors) that Slobo was denied the acquittal and was unable to carry his fight to the end. The fascists triumphed this time. S4
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#5
mv Wrote:You mean that English is too limited to express the depth of emotions? Wink1

It has some 4-letter words....

Oh well, let me state that I'm deeply **** off (censors) that Slobo was denied the acquittal and was unable to carry his fight to the end. The fascists triumphed this time. S4
Exactly, but word "fascists" is too good for them. Would they be fascists..., at least Theo van Gogh would be alive.
They are ... taxpayers...
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#6
mv, do you think this ends it? I can envision the conspiracy whackos coming out of the woodwork - yet the reality is condemnation enough for the kangaroo court that was set up just to make Clinton and NATO actions appear legitimate.

Check out Jatras: Bosnia: The Birthplace of Al-Qaeda to really understand the lit fuses running to every conspiracy group there is.
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#7
bh Wrote:
mv Wrote:You mean that English is too limited to express the depth of emotions? Wink1

It has some 4-letter words....

Oh well, let me state that I'm deeply **** off (censors) that Slobo was denied the acquittal and was unable to carry his fight to the end. The fascists triumphed this time. S4
Exactly, but word "fascists" is too good for them. Would they be fascists..., at least Theo van Gogh would be alive.
They are ... taxpayers...

I like this. Sadly, I am one of them, my taxes paid for the Clinton crimes.

Also, what I said was unfair to the fascists. Hitler gave Dimitrov a reasonably fair trial.

Quote:mv, do you think this ends it? I can envision the conspiracy whackos coming out of the woodwork - yet the reality is condemnation enough for the kangaroo court that was set up just to make Clinton and NATO actions appear legitimate.

Conspiracy claims are out already,
BBC talks of poisoning; Pravda accuses.

Sadly, this will be forgotten quite soon. Remember the Hess case?

It may come back when the Balkans explode next time; perhaps Slobo will still become the national hero. He has a chance still; Clinton/Bush don't.
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#8
Quote:The BBC's Geraldine Coughlan at The Hague says Mr Milosevic's death is a blow to prosecutors, who had been hoping to convict him as being part of a joint criminal enterprise that operated across the former Yugoslavia, intent on setting up a greater Serbian state.
Orwell would not said it better. Bitches.
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#9
In my lifetime,this event is the ONE where I will agree with anyone who says the USA was IMPERIALIST. we were and not even for a valid reason,like enhancing your own value as a nation,stealing land,nothing with some redeeming value.

Just disgusting.
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#10
No, Imperialist isn't the right word. Wag the Dog might be a little closer. Clinton was arming the Islamicists to attack the legitimate Serbian army called in by the beseiged Kosovo police, this was possibly a quid pro quo for campaign cash. The KLA hired wall street advertising/PR firms to sell their attempt to grab off Kosovar land and lucre. When the PR effort resonated enough, and the Cox Committee on PRC technology "gifts" for fundraising dollars and the Lewinski blue dress hit the tabloids, that ol' wag started in a doggin'.
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#11
Quote:No, Imperialist isn't the right word.

Concur. Imperialist implies building an empire, not playing idiotic destructive and pointless games with other people lives.
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#12
Palladin Wrote:In my lifetime,this event is the ONE where I will agree with anyone who says the USA was IMPERIALIST. we were and not even for a valid reason,like enhancing your own value as a nation,stealing land,nothing with some redeeming value.

Just disgusting.
So OK. What Economic Control do we exert? What territory did we acquire?
What is the name of the Empire we created there? What is the name of the Emperor of this Empire?
If we are the Empire how did we get this Emperor? Elect him? Hmmmm.
Clinton was a a&& but he was no Emperor.
Can you show how we control the Serb Political system?
You pretty much need all that for Imperialism unless you own the definition of Imperialism and these don't fit it.
Are you referring to Marx Lenin Imperialism?
If so where is control of their Capitalism?
Enquiring minds want to know?
A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government
Edward Abbey
[Image: eagle_1721.png]
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#13
Thought this was humorous given the occasion.

Running out the Clock
by Mark Steyn.

Well, it's January, December's come and gone, so let's add up the score:

Coalition of the Willing: Saddam captured, Gadhafi neutered.

The 'International Community': Milosevic elected to Parliament in Belgrade.

Yes, indeed. On the last weekend of the year, Slobo won a seat in Serbia's legislature, as did his fellow "alleged' (as Wes Clark would say) war criminal Vojislav Seselj, and Seselj's extreme nationalist Serbian Radical Party won more seats than anybody else.

But hang on a minute. Aren't Milosevic and Seselj in jail at the Hague and facing the stern justice of an 'international tribunal'? Why, yes. Slobo's been on trial for two years already, and they're only just wrapping up the prosecution. Among the witnesses was, of course, Gen. Clark, who couldn't resist boasting that he's the only Democratic presidential candidate 'who's ever faced a dictator down. I'm the only one who's ever testified in court against one.' Au contraire, right now it looks like Slobo is the only Serbian parliamentary candidate who's ever faced a U.S. general down.

Anyone who goes goo-goo at the mention of the words 'international tribunal' — i.e., Clark, John Kerry, Howard Dean and the rest of the multilatte multilateralist establishment — should look at what it boils down to in practice. Even though the court forbade Milosevic and Seselj from actively campaigning in the Serbian election, they somehow managed to. In other words, 'international law' is unable to enforce its judgments even in its own jailhouse.

But it's worse than that. One reason why Slobo is popular again in Serbia is precisely because of the 'international' trial. In 2000, when the strongman of the Balkans was swept from power, he was a discredited figure, a European pariah reviled as a murderous butcher. After two years of legal hair-splitting at the Hague, he's all but fully rehabilitated. True, Slobo, conducting his own defense, has been a shameless showboater, but not half as shameless as the absurd prosecutor Carla del Ponte. It's received wisdom among battered Serb democrats that every clumsy indictment of Ponte's drove Slobo's poll numbers higher. Had Serbs prosecuted Milosevic, that would have been one thing. But once it became Europreeners prosecuting Serbs, an understandable resentment set in.

This is the justice Clark wants for Saddam Hussein. If he gets his way, Saddam seems a shoo-in for the Iraqi presidential election circa 2009. But that seems to be the modus operandi of Clark, the great hero of small inconclusive wars in which the United States has no vital interest and, even if it did, Clark would be pleased to ignore it just to demonstrate his multilateral bona fides.




It's not just him, of course. Up to the moment Saddam popped out of the spider-hole, the international jet set's line was that deplorable as Saddam's rule might be — gassing Kurds, feeding folks feet-first into industrial shredders, etc. — it was strictly an internal matter for the Iraqi people. The minute the old boy was in U.S. custody, the international jet set's revised position was that gassing Kurds, feeding folks into industrial shredders and so forth were crimes against the whole world and certainly not a matter for the Iraqi people. Instead, we need a (drumroll, please) United Nations-mandated international tribunal.

This is what the Zionist neocons would call chutzpah.

President Bush understands that the transnational establishment's interest in this case is not to pass judgment on Saddam but, by reasserting its authority, to pass judgment on America — on its illegitimate war, illegal occupation, barbaric justice system, etc. The argument of the trannies is that only a Hague tribunal can confer 'legitimacy' — 'legitimacy' being one of those great sonorous banalities that are at the heart of what's wrong with the international order, which, in the main, confers the mantle of legitimacy on a lot of 'illegitimate' thugs. Indeed, two years of a farcical trial of the Hague seem to have conferred 'legitimacy' mainly on the rehabilitated Slobo.

But Saddam has been toppled, and Gadhafi has surrendered up his own WMD program to the Brits and Yanks. So the fellows in need of 'legitimacy' right now are the international institutions presided over by Kofi Annan and Co., who look, to put it at its mildest, utterly irrelevant and, at its worst, the pathetic patsies of Slobo and his ilk.

So the only strategic significance of Saddam's trial is whether the transnational establishment gets rehabilitated or sidelined. The argument in favor of an international tribunal is that a full accounting of Saddam's crimes will be made before the whole world. Really? Anyone who doesn't know about the mass graves and torture in Baathist Iraq is someone who's chosen not to. A lot of people fall into that camp — for example, weapons inspector turned Saddamite shill Scott Ritter. 'The prison in question was inspected by my team in January 1998,' he told Time magazine, a propos one grisly institution. 'It appeared to be a prison for children — toddlers up to pre-adolescents — whose only crime was to be the offspring of those who have spoken out politically against the regime of Saddam Hussein. It was a horrific scene. Actually, I'm not going to describe what I saw there, because what I saw was so horrible that it can be used by those who would want to promote war with Iraq, and right now I'm waging peace.'

Ritter is rare in the extent of his depravity: He saw the horror close up and opted to turn his back. But in the interests of 'peace,' many others in the transnational elites did the same from a safe distance. It's too late for them to claim that the stuff they covered up now needs a full airing in an international court.

As for the legal niceties, unless a dictator is canny enough to negotiate a transition to democracy, his subsequent trial will inevitably be as much about politics as justice. But then, letting dictators swank around the courtroom in a 10-year dinner-theater run of 'Perry Mason' has nothing to do with justice either.

To allow the transnational jet set to reclaim Saddam would be to reward them for their indifference to Iraqi suffering. Let's get on with it in Baghdad. A trial next summer, conviction in the fall, and (to forestall accusations it's all timed for the U.S. elections) execution deferred until a day or two after Bush's inaugural address in January.

Of course, I hasten to add that's only if the mass murderer is found guilty.

I'm sorry, my mistake. I mean, the alleged mass murderer.
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#14
I've suddenly developed a liking of Mark Steyn. Except for his Zionist neocon crack, a lot of what he wrote makes a lot of sense.

General Wesley Clark has always been a joke to me, every since he headed the Dayton accords where both sides promised peace - but in the middle of it, his boss decided unilateral bombing of Kosovo was more important than peace, so they all had to go home. This was far worse than wanting to attack the airport after the Russians had beat him to it, and the British General under Clark's command refused to "start WWIII".
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#15
Re.:
Quote:Except for his Zionist neocon crack
Why? I found it funny. S1
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#16
Eagle,

Forcing a tiny little state NOT OUR ENEMY to hand over it's elected leader for a trial we decided on doesn't bother you,but it sure as HE.LL bothers me. Maybe it isn't imperilaism,maybe it's just the arrogance of the strong,but this is how Hitler and Stalin acted. As an American in spirit and not only birth,it is disgusting both that it happened and that many Americans in their haughty self assurance think it is good we did it. It tells me this nation is far below what I was raised thinking we were.

Palladin
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#17
Some very interesting facts were just on the news here: an medical examination conducted between November 2005 and January 2006 showed that Milosevic had been given medicines against lepra and TBC. These medicines nullify the effects of his heart medicines, he did of course not have lepra or TBC. This sounds like murder, and hopefully very bad news for the ICC.
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#18
SNK Wrote:Some very interesting facts were just on the news here: an medical examination conducted between November 2005 and January 2006 showed that Milosevic had been given medicines against lepra and TBC. These medicines nullify the effects of his heart medicines, he did of course not have lepra or TBC. This sounds like murder, and hopefully very bad news for the ICC.
May be del Ponte have lepra. It looks probable ... on my TV.
At least 4 Serbs died in ICC. It's tendency... Gestapo was more humane.
I can't understand in particular how Babich could commit suicide. It's jail, all the goods suitible to commit suicide must be confiscated...
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#19
SNK Wrote:This sounds like murder, and hopefully very bad news for the ICC.

I wonder where it puts the Dutch government.... A murder (or a series of murders) committed on its territory....

AP confirms drugs.
Government is necessary because people left unchecked will do evil.

The government is composed of people left unchecked


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#20
Palladin Wrote:Forcing a tiny little state NOT OUR ENEMY to hand over it's elected leader for a trial...
...No, he was kidnapped by Serbian Prime Minister, Zoran Djindjic. His country voted to keep him safe, and the Yugoslavian president, Vojislav Kostunica, a former law professor opposed the action, and resigned in outrage. The laws of the country forbade what Djindjic did, but the court turned a blind eye to the crime.
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