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3D Printed Homes
#1
Eindhoven, Netherlands, is printing homes

This is a growing construction technique and is happening in many test sites across the world. Robotic 3D Printing may be the wave of the future. It uses less concrete than just pouring between slabs, and is measurably faster than human-based methods.
Current projects use this technique piecemeal. Working with robots.

[Image: img-20171004-wa0010-1512066433.jpg?quali...1600&h=901]

At the moment, Robots can't do it all. We still need MEP, glazers, and finish carpenters to attach all the bric-a-brac, However; there is nothing that can't be programmed to be done with ongoing projects.

Moreover, concrete, advanced plastics, and polymers can all be printed. Even pipes and cables can be printed in place. Hanging doors and inserting circuit boards are a few things that may be easier to add after construction.

What happens after we learn to build robots to build the robots?
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#2
(09-14-2019, 11:44 AM)WmLambert Wrote: What happens after we learn to build robots to build the robots?

Science Fiction will become Science Fact.  Spiteful

Talk about Ugly......... S18
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“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#3
I wonder what could build the pyramids faster, 3D Printing or melting stones?
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#4
If you started both at the same time, one would have to build some sort of power generating facility for the printer plus create wires for conducting the power, plus creating the various metals needed, etc. Using the tools of that day, you'd probably be sitting on top of the pyramid waiting for the 3D printer to be manufactured.

S1
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#5
(09-16-2019, 08:32 AM)JohnWho Wrote: If you started both at the same time, one would have to build some sort of power generating facility for the printer plus create wires for conducting the power, plus creating the various metals needed, etc.  Using the tools of that day, you'd probably be sitting on top of the pyramid waiting for the 3D printer to be manufactured.

S1

We start the clock with a fully tested quarry and slave labor in the desert, as opposed to a fully functional concrete 3D printer capable of moving as it builds. Energy for it is assumed.
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#6
[Image: anderson-explain-to-me-how-comparing-app...691625.png]

I think the last word in the sentence really should have been "Fruitful".
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#7
Sorry, I thought the idea of 3D printing of buildings was interesting.
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#8
(09-19-2019, 09:40 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Sorry, I thought the idea of 3D printing of buildings was interesting.

It is. I've followed it closely for awhile now.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#9
My questions are all about efficacy. How much does such a 3D printer weigh and how much does it cost? How much maintenance is necessary, and how quickly does it work? Can it use high-density concrete and not just the cheap stuff? Can it replace manpower, or just add options?

If the Egyptians used stone softening to build the pyramids, is this process another building breakthrough?

At the moment, I'd guess it takes more manpower to make houses using this technology than normally. But after the amortization period...?
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