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The Worst Year to Be Alive!
#1
As a history major I can remember my Ancient History/Middle Ages course my senior year.  Even back then, the science was incomplete as to just why the Dark Ages, the collapse of the Roman Empire, and untold deaths just happened to occur.

In the year 536AD, and the following decade,  the century's old Roman Empire was on the skids, crops were failing, and Europe in general was being invaded by the Huns, vangals, and you name it.  And the one thing that was not added into the equation for decades was the effect of Climate on civilization.  At that time it was a Buggerin' Mess to be civilized.

According to the Smithsonian Institute "Sixth-Century Misery Tied to Not One, But Two, Volcanic Eruptions.

Quote:Scientists had long suspected that the cause of all this misery might be a volcanic eruption, probably from Ilopango in El Salvador, which filled Earth's atmosphere with ash. But now researchers say there were two eruptions—one in 535 or 536 in the northern hemisphere and another in 539 or 540 in the tropics—that kept temperatures in the north cool until 550.

And Science | AAAS agrees: 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’, and its all in the ice record for us to study.  It was where the term "Dark Ages" originated.

Quote:Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, "It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year," says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.

A mysterious fog plunged Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia into darkness, day and night—for 18 months. "For the sun gave forth its light without brightness, like the moon, during the whole year," wrote Byzantine historian Procopius. Temperatures in the summer of 536 fell 1.5°C to 2.5°C, initiating the coldest decade in the past 2300 years. Snow fell that summer in China; crops failed; people starved. The Irish chronicles record "a failure of bread from the years 536–539." Then, in 541, bubonic plague struck the Roman port of Pelusium, in Egypt. What came to be called the Plague of Justinian spread rapidly, wiping out one-third to one-half of the population of the eastern Roman Empire and hastening its collapse, McCormick says.

Historians have long known that the middle of the sixth century was a dark hour in what used to be called the Dark Ages, but the source of the mysterious clouds has long been a puzzle. Now, an ultraprecise analysis of ice from a Swiss glacier by a team led by McCormick and glaciologist Paul Mayewski at the Climate Change Institute of The University of Maine (UM) in Orono has fingered a culprit. At a workshop at Harvard this week, the team reported that a cataclysmic volcanic eruption in Iceland spewed ash across the Northern Hemisphere early in 536. Two other massive eruptions followed, in 540 and 547. The repeated blows, followed by plague, plunged Europe into economic stagnation that lasted until 640, when another signal in the ice—a spike in airborne lead—marks a resurgence of silver mining, as the team reports in Antiquity this week.

[Image: 6284240-0-image-a-9_1542389912897.jpg]
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#2
Here's a very good documentary on one of the events, the Illipango Eruption of Central America, that shook the world.

Perfect Storms: DARK AGE VOLCANO | Full Documentary


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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#3
Actually,

Quote:Scientists had long suspected that the cause of all this misery might be a volcanic eruption,

this is questionable. I'm not denying that volcanoes (or meteorites ) could drastically impact the climate, but there is one more possibility that the scientists were not allowed to consider, and unlike random natural catastrophes we can actually check that possibility! -- we cannot reliably measure the impact of volcanic eruptions hundreds of years ago, only guess.

The possibility is simply the natural cycles of the Sun.

We know now that we are likely entering a mini Ice age, which would be more severe than any minimums in the 2nd millennium. Something like 200-300 years and 6-8C temperature drop, this is what the models predict now.

The question that begs to be asked: what does the model say about the 1st millennium minimums? I'm sure the answer is known to the authors of the models, but was it published? -- I could not find this. And there is a good chance that the 1st millennium had a minimum comparable to the the forthcoming one..... and if so, this is a perfect explanation for the Roman Empire collapse, among other things!

So... I'd put aside volcanic eruptions and other random calamities until we know more about the Sun activity at that time. S6
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#4
What happened to Bill and Ron's posts? I was going to comment on them today, but they aren't here any more. Shock
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#5
(11-29-2018, 02:44 AM)mv Wrote: So... I'd put aside volcanic eruptions and other random calamities until we know more about the Sun activity at that time. S6

It seems to me that all of the accumulated events were anything but random.  We all know that strange things happen when the sun goes quiet, as it is in the process of doing right now.  Last year 28% of all days were without sunspots facing our planet.  This year the percentage is 59% and counting.  Next year will certainly be much higher as we don't officially enter this coming Grand Solar Minimum until 2020.  Then Lord help us all.

But one thing that is always omitted from the data is the locations of the Jovian Planets during all this.  All have considerable mass, and would certainly contribute to an increase or decrease in what occurs on this planet.   I predict that in time this will also be entered into the equation.  This is most likely one of the reasons why GSMs have varying degrees of earthquakes, and volcanic activity(sudden plate movement)

My thinking is that in and around 536AD the planet went through one Huge GSM, leading to All of the reported activities in and around the planet.  And if we add one or more Impactors to this series of events, the situation became much, much greater.  

I suspect that All of the events were related to each other, and constituted what is known in the military as "TOT - Time On Target".  Everything going off at once.
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#6
(11-29-2018, 12:46 PM)John L Wrote:
(11-29-2018, 02:44 AM)mv Wrote: So... I'd put aside volcanic eruptions and other random calamities until we know more about the Sun activity at that time. S6

It seems to me that all of the accumulated events were anything but random.  

The inner activity of the Sun is surely not random and a proper computer model should be able to both predict it and show the past. There seems to be such a model, there were articles about it two weeks ago -- some Russian woman, working in some New England University -- I am having a mental block right now.  It is inconceivable to me that she did not run the model backward, and it is quite possible that in her articles (not media reports that I read) there is a chart that goes far into the past -- need to find it and look.

I'd further notice that if there was a big minimum at the time of the fall of the Roman empire, we may have another minimum at equal distance further into the past .. and that would be the fall of the Mycenaean Greece time. 

But meteorites and volcanoes are random... so it is prudent to try to exclude the Sun before considering them. (Not to deny that they may impact climate more than the Sun cycles.).  And it is probably wise to see what she says before speculating about possible Sun impact on earthquakes (not excluding this at all) and likewise if she incorporated large planets into the model (as a guess -- no).

===

OK, remembered : Valentina Zharkova, a professor of mathematics at Northumbria University.

Quote:Valentina Zharkova, a professor of mathematics at Northumbria University, published a paper which contains ‘the first serious prediction of a reduction of solar activity that might affect human lives’. ‘I hope global warming will be overridden by this effect, giving humankind and the Earth 30 years to sort out our pollution,’ she said. Michael Brown, an associate professor of astronomy at Monash University in Australia, said the Maunder Minimum could have been caused by other factors including the eruptions of volcanos.

https://metro.co.uk/2018/11/16/nasa-slowdown-8146529/

The last sentence is copied to point out a wrong way of thinking.... if the model predicted two past solar minimums and seems to predict the current one, lets not worry about the volcanoes, especially during recent past which we kind of know ....

But this is even funnier:

Quote:Update: This article has been amended since initial publication to remove the erroneous suggestion that the possibly record-breaking cooling of the thermosphere, located over 100km above the surface of the Earth, would have the effect on the troposphere of ‘a mini Ice Age’. We are happy to clarify that the record low temperatures reported as part of a natural cycle in solar activity are not inconsistent with current scientific findings of a warming troposphere, and apologise for any contrary impression given.

AGW censors noticed and interfered ... no Ice Age, relax.

PPS. This is the actual paper that caused the uproar...

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...cles_21-23

does not have the past, this older article

https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._timescale

has but not far enough. There may be something else.
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#7
(11-29-2018, 02:35 PM)mv Wrote: But meteorites and volcanoes are random... so it is prudent to try to exclude the Sun before considering them. (Not to deny that they may impact climate more than the Sun cycles.).  And it is probably wise to see what she says before speculating about possible Sun impact on earthquakes (not excluding this at all) and likewise if she incorporated large planets into the model (as a guess -- no).

I didn't state that Impactors(meteorites, larger asteroids, or comets) were not random.  I just stated that an Impactor was probably an added part of the equation.  As for volcanic activity, or plate shifting, some of it is indeed random.  HOWEVER, the biggest incidence is caused by the same thing that causes the tides to rise and fall: Mass attraction, i.e. gravity.  But in this case it isn't the moon, rather the Jovian planets who are unbelievably massive.  When one gets in a position to influence this planet, it does so.  Further, if you look at the position of the planets during a grand solar minimum, Jupiter and Saturn tend to switch orbital positions, and about every fourth solar minimum they are in particularly influential position.  

Granted, its "mostly" the sun Stupid!, but not all of it, and that is the Jovian planets exerting gravitational influence on not only our planet, but also the sun.  Its just not official....yet.

I'll try to comment on the rest of your post later, but I am terribly busy cleaning up all of the leaves in my yard.  They're everywhere and stuck to the ground due to a good old fashioned rain.  S4
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#8
I use my lawnmower to pick up leaves, I have a lot of trees, the lawnmower does a really good job in half the time.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#9
(11-29-2018, 07:45 PM)Canuknucklehead Wrote: I use my lawnmower to pick up leaves, I have a lot of trees, the lawnmower does a really good job in half the time.

Under normal circumstances I would agree. However, my small front yard has this now Huge sexual pervert maple tree that has lots of cover AND roots that make it virtually impossible to treat normally. It is also aided by the oak trees in both my neighbor's yards, which float down into the yard.

Also, this has been the rainiest fall season of the last 22 years I have lived here. Every time I get ready to finally do something, it rains, and the water causes the leaves to stick to the ground. Its a friggin' mess out there, so I have to use a rake and physically rake them into piles. We are so over the normal rainfall this fall, that I have thrown up my hands and let them accumulate until there are a few dry days in a row. Then I rake them up. I could blow most of them with my electric or gasoline powered blower, but raking takes just as long, and I need the exercise.
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#10
I went to a meeting at the local Quality Inn to hear a presentation on a local medical enterprise with new technology. It was All about human umbilical cord stem cell protocol.

HUC is legal while embryonic Stem cell is illegal, and harvesting stem sells from one's own body is counter-indicated because there are only 1 out of two million cells that can be harvested from a 50-year old. Since these HUC stem cells are undifferentiated, they cannot be rejected and can grow into any cell needed by the body. One protocol sells 1 cc of stem cells for $3,715, plus a $195 consult. Inject half of that into a knee which is almost bone-on-bone, and after 3 to four weeks, the meniscus is largely regenerated. Sounds like regeneration and fast heal from David Weber. There were many testimonials from those who underwent treatment and became pain-free and had measurable regeneration

A point I saw as interesting was that areas needing treatment are usually inflamed and higher temperature which somehow makes the injected Stem cells immigrated to that area. The presenter was a former 6'-9" pro-basketball player in Italy, who had to stop playing because of knee, back, and shoulder injuries. He used 1/2 cc on his knee and the same on his shoulder, and a full cc on his back. Now he claims 100% pain-free and full mobility.

One taped testimonial quipped how his libido was improved. Sounds like a favorable thing - but insurance does not cover it.
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