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Iran and Rebirth of Zoroastrianism
#1
Iran is a country that is on the verge of a cultural/religious explosion.  It is suppressed by Islam, and mostly overlooked in the West, out of ignorance.  And that is the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism.  At least 80% of the Iranian population is under thirty, and young Iranians are embracing the teachings of Zarathustra, and Christ.  But the majority of young Iranians are embracing the former, and the Mullahs are running scared.

CULTURE: The Religion That The Iranian Mullahs Fear Most

Quote:Much less well-known is that Zoroastrianism is a living faith, with communities in India, Europe, the United States, and the Middle East—especially Iran. Ten years ago, a study by the Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of America concluded that there were, at most, 190,000 followers of the faith around the world. But as Laurie Goodstein noted in The New York Times, there was reason to be skeptical of this number, because of the “wildly diverging counts in Iran, once known as Persia – the incubator of the faith.”

In common with other religions, Zoroastrians in Iran have confronted both persecution and a concerted attempt by the Islamist regime in Tehran to destroy the very foundations of their faith. One critical consequence of this—no doubt unintended by the ruling mullahs—is that growing numbers of Iranians inside and outside the country are exploring a faith that crystallized two millennia before the Prophet Muhammed appeared on the scene. “Converting back” to Zoroastrianism, as many refer to the process of rediscovering their roots, has encouraged a view of Islam as an alien Arab faith that was imposed on unwilling Persians during the Muslim conquest of the seventh century.

What most people do not know, is that Judaism and Christianity, have strong ties to Zoroastrianism.  Many fundamentalists refuse to admit this, but Judaism incorporated many of their religious practices from the Persians, following their rescue after Persia conquered Babylon. Ever since, until 1979, the two countries have always been friends and allies.  

Quote:The obscure religion that shaped the West

The idea of a single god was not the only essentially Zoroastrian tenet to find its way into other major faiths, most notably the ‘big three’: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The concepts of Heaven and Hell, Judgment Day and the final revelation of the world, and angels and demons all originated in the teachings of Zarathustra, as well as the later canon of Zoroastrian literature they inspired. Even the idea of Satan is a fundamentally Zoroastrian one; in fact, the entire faith of Zoroastrianism is predicated on the struggle between God and the forces of goodness and light (represented by the Holy Spirit, Spenta Manyu) and Ahriman, who presides over the forces of darkness and evil. While man has to choose to which side he belongs, the religion teaches that ultimately, God will prevail, and even those condemned to hellfire will enjoy the blessings of Paradise (an Old Persian word).

How did Zoroastrian ideas find their way into the Abrahamic faiths and elsewhere? According to scholars, many of these concepts were introduced to the Jews of Babylon upon being liberated by the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great. They trickled into mainstream Jewish thought, and figures like Beelzebub emerged. And after Persia’s conquests of Greek lands during the heyday of the Achaemenid Empire, Greek philosophy took a different course. The Greeks had previously believed humans had little agency, and that their fates were at the mercy of their many gods, who often acted according to whim and fancy. After their acquaintance with Iranian religion and philosophy, however, they began to feel more as if they were the masters of their destinies, and that their decisions were in their own hands.

Once Islam is put in its place, within Iran, my best guess is that Zoroastrianism will experience a huge rebirth among the millions of under thirty Iranians.  Most Iranians are so fed up with Islam that they will be embracing Zorastrian and Christian beliefs.

The curious rebirth of Zoroastrianism in Iraqi Kurdistan

Morgan Freeman's Zoroastrian Story of God


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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#2
(04-15-2018, 11:02 AM)John L Wrote: Iran is a country that is on the verge of a cultural/religious explosion.  It is suppressed by Islam, and mostly overlooked in the West, out of ignorance.  And that is the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism.  At least 80% of the Iranian population is under thirty, and young Iranians are embracing the teachings of Zarathustra, and Christ.  But the majority of young Iranians are embracing the former, and the Mullahs are running scared.

CULTURE: The Religion That The Iranian Mullahs Fear Most

Quote:Much less well-known is that Zoroastrianism is a living faith, with communities in India, Europe, the United States, and the Middle East—especially Iran. Ten years ago, a study by the Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of America concluded that there were, at most, 190,000 followers of the faith around the world. But as Laurie Goodstein noted in The New York Times, there was reason to be skeptical of this number, because of the “wildly diverging counts in Iran, once known as Persia – the incubator of the faith.”

In common with other religions, Zoroastrians in Iran have confronted both persecution and a concerted attempt by the Islamist regime in Tehran to destroy the very foundations of their faith. One critical consequence of this—no doubt unintended by the ruling mullahs—is that growing numbers of Iranians inside and outside the country are exploring a faith that crystallized two millennia before the Prophet Muhammed appeared on the scene. “Converting back” to Zoroastrianism, as many refer to the process of rediscovering their roots, has encouraged a view of Islam as an alien Arab faith that was imposed on unwilling Persians during the Muslim conquest of the seventh century.

What most people do not know, is that Judaism and Christianity, have strong ties to Zoroastrianism.  Many fundamentalists refuse to admit this, but Judaism incorporated many of their religious practices from the Persians, following their rescue after Persia conquered Babylon. Ever since, until 1979, the two countries have always been friends and allies.  

Quote:The obscure religion that shaped the West

The idea of a single god was not the only essentially Zoroastrian tenet to find its way into other major faiths, most notably the ‘big three’: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The concepts of Heaven and Hell, Judgment Day and the final revelation of the world, and angels and demons all originated in the teachings of Zarathustra, as well as the later canon of Zoroastrian literature they inspired. Even the idea of Satan is a fundamentally Zoroastrian one; in fact, the entire faith of Zoroastrianism is predicated on the struggle between God and the forces of goodness and light (represented by the Holy Spirit, Spenta Manyu) and Ahriman, who presides over the forces of darkness and evil. While man has to choose to which side he belongs, the religion teaches that ultimately, God will prevail, and even those condemned to hellfire will enjoy the blessings of Paradise (an Old Persian word).

How did Zoroastrian ideas find their way into the Abrahamic faiths and elsewhere? According to scholars, many of these concepts were introduced to the Jews of Babylon upon being liberated by the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great. They trickled into mainstream Jewish thought, and figures like Beelzebub emerged. And after Persia’s conquests of Greek lands during the heyday of the Achaemenid Empire, Greek philosophy took a different course. The Greeks had previously believed humans had little agency, and that their fates were at the mercy of their many gods, who often acted according to whim and fancy. After their acquaintance with Iranian religion and philosophy, however, they began to feel more as if they were the masters of their destinies, and that their decisions were in their own hands.

Once Islam is put in its place, within Iran, my best guess is that Zoroastrianism will experience a huge rebirth among the millions of under thirty Iranians.  Most Iranians are so fed up with Islam that they will be embracing Zorastrian and Christian beliefs.

The curious rebirth of Zoroastrianism in Iraqi Kurdistan

Morgan Freeman's Zoroastrian Story of God



 I thought Zarathustra had 2 co equal God's, not 1? One evil, one good?

 He also had a Jewish male as a Messianic figure. If that isn't weird what is for a Gentile religion?

 BTW, I am an associate of an Iranian evangelism outfit and they think the growth of Christ in Iran is fairly fast as well.
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#3
I learned in a history of philosophy class at UofM, that the Jewish religion was the first to have a male divinity instead of a female "mother Earth" type, which was one of the core ideologies that made it popular. Was Zoroastrianism a male divinity faith before Judaism?
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#4
The ancient pagan gods in the Old Testament are male names. Moloch, Ba'al, Marduk are actually named.

Ba'al might be a word that simply = god or lord though and not a proper name. It comes from Ugarit which was just rediscovered a century ago.

Was a female goddess ever the most high god of a pantheon? I don't know. Maybe Isis?
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