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Heavenly Spices
#1
What is your favorite spice, or spices? If you love great food, and flavor is important to you, this is the thread to tell us just what you use with your food.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#2
I have been meaning to write about this for a good while now, but kept forgetting to post about it.  And what I am talking about is [/i]"Pepper"[/i], or better yet, peppercorns.  Peppercorns has alway been the most prized spice, once obtaining salt has been solved.  Its the life-blood of cooking.  

About twenty-five years ago I began going with whole peppercorns, ground fresh from a hand held pepper grinder.  I thought that was the best answer, and I used my grinders all of the time.  Yes, I have several hand grinders, and they all grind differently.  

But I never realized just what I was missing until I stumbled on to freshly ground Tellicherry peppers.  I was about to order pepper from Prenzy's Spices  one day, and noticed that the best of the best, and most expensive too, had the word "Tellicherry" attached to its name.  So I ordered a 16 oz bag and the rest is history.  

[Image: 81zE1Mn-47L._SY679SX345_SY679_CR,0,0,345..._SH20_.jpg]

When I first loaded up my empty pepper grinder, and began grinding them, I noticed that the aroma was fantastic.  I had never noticed this in the regular, run of the mill peppers I used to use.  So, I went to my other pepper grinder and set the two side by side.  I then ground out the two peppercorns into two locations and then smelled them.  The regular peppers smelled good, but the Tellicherry was so overpowering, and marvelous that were was simply no comparrison.  

So, the next thing I did, was go to the internet, and research just what Tellicherry was, and why it was so different from others, besides its cost.  And boy, what an education I received from this.  

I immediately took all of the old peppercorns, and cheap ground pepper, and dumped them in the trash, replacing them with Tellicherry.  I've never looked back ever since.  Now, I order it by the pound.  My friend Michael, and I, go through a 16 oz container about twice a year.  We use lots of Tellicherry with almost everything we eat.  

If you have never been introduced to the world of Tellicherry, and you love food, you owe it to yourself to get some and compare it to your cheap, run-of-the-mill pepper.  You will not believe the difference,........and you will never look back.  S22


A video that went viral about peppercorns? Really.


___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#3
It may taste good, and smell good (a-choo!), but what I have against black pepper is that it is "cured," that is, set out and allowed to turn black. I am a little wary of that. You can also buy the same thing, from the same pepper plant, but uncured. It is called "white pepper." It actually tastes a little hotter than black pepper. But it still is not my favorite spice. (I have the same reservations about regular tea--"green tea" comes from the same plant leaves, but is not "cured." For some reason it is also a little lower in caffeine.)

I would have to say at least one of my favorite spices is cinnamon. Not only does it taste great in many uses from cookies to oatmeal to pumpkin pie, it also helps to lower the level of blood sugar, of interest to me because I have Type II diabetes. I take cinnamon/chromium capsules to supplement my Metformin.
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#4
(05-14-2016, 05:37 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: It may taste good, and smell good (a-choo!), but what I have against black pepper is that it is "cured," that is, set out and allowed to turn black. I am a little wary of that. You can also buy the same thing, from the same pepper plant, but uncured. It is called "white pepper." It actually tastes a little hotter than black pepper. But it still is not my favorite spice. (I have the same reservations about regular tea--"green tea" comes from the same plant leaves, but is not "cured." For some reason it is also a little lower in caffeine.)

Allowing the peppercorns to sit out and cure slowly is perfectly natural and healthy.  You are getting over-cautious there.  Tellicherry is still the best pepper in the world.  Smelling it freshly ground, where it comes out of the grinder is like heaven on earth.  S21

Now, tea is an entirely different matter.  Green tea is unprocessed, and what I drink in great quantities.  I drink between four and five gallons a week as iced tea.  The more smoothies I drink, the less tea I consume.  The regular tea that almost everyone drinks is roasted in an oven, killing all of the enzymes.  I prefer green tea, because of this.  

Same thing goes with cocoa powder.   If you make hot cocoa, chances are you are not aware that it too is roasted under intense heat.  I only use "Cacao" powder, because it is not heat processed.  Cacao powder has perhaps more natural enzymes and vitamins in it than any spice.   I make a smoothie every morning, and I always include a heaping teaspoon of cacao powder, along with peanuts, into the blender.  Sometimes I make a second one in the evening.   Here's what I order, in a two pound container from Amazon.  

Quote:I would have to say at least one of my favorite spices is cinnamon. Not only does it taste great in many uses from cookies to oatmeal to pumpkin pie, it also helps to lower the level of blood sugar, of interest to me because I have Type II diabetes. I take cinnamon/chromium capsules to supplement my Metformin.

I too am a cinnamon person, but don't consume it in large quantities.  

Are you using Cassia, or Ceylon cinnamon?  There's a big difference.  At least 70% of all cinnamon sold in the US is Cassia, and I believe its all Cassia in the supermarkets.  Cassia has a much stronger flavor, and is what almost everyone thinks when cinnamon is mentioned.  But Cassia also has a bad ingredient: coumarin.  This is what gives cinnamon its strong, pungent odor and taste.   High amounts of coumarin can cause liver dammage.  

Ceylon cinnamon is the Real McCoy, and has very low levels of coumarin.  And it has a very subtle flavor.  If you are accustomed to Cassia, you will think, "What The..................?  That doesn't taste like cinnamon."  The first impulse is to drop it all in the trash and run out to the grocery store and get the other kind.   That was my first impression.

My last batch I bought in February, 2014, from Amazon.  Its a one pound bag, and I still haven't used it up yet. I'm going to start making toast in the morning, and use coconut oil instead of butter.  Then I am going to add a good amount of this Ceylon cinnamon to it.   But you have to use a lot, if you are accustomed to the cheap, Cassia type.  

Here's a very good video, explaining what you need to know about cinnamon.

Types of Cinnamon


___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
I only use Ceylon cinnamon, after I tried it for the first time I swore I'd never go back to the Mexican crap.
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#6
(05-14-2016, 09:58 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: I only use Ceylon cinnamon, after I tried it for the first time I swore I'd never go back to the Mexican crap.

I don't believe Mexico grows cinnamon.  At least that's what the video states.  Go to the 4:15 mark.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#7
I thought research showed that dark chocolate makes a person smarter. I do like white chocolate, is that unprocessed?
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#8
(05-15-2016, 12:19 AM)John L Wrote:
(05-14-2016, 09:58 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: I only use Ceylon cinnamon, after I tried it for the first time I swore I'd never go back to the Mexican crap.

I don't believe Mexico grows cinnamon.  At least that's what the video states.  Go to the 4:15 mark.

 I screwed up, most of the cinnamon sold in Canada isn't from Ceylon, I started using cinnamon from Ceylon about three years ago, it's available in health food stores.
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#9
(05-18-2016, 02:53 PM)WarBicycle Wrote:
(05-15-2016, 12:19 AM)John L Wrote:
(05-14-2016, 09:58 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: I only use Ceylon cinnamon, after I tried it for the first time I swore I'd never go back to the Mexican crap.

I don't believe Mexico grows cinnamon.  At least that's what the video states.  Go to the 4:15 mark.

 I screwed up, most of the cinnamon sold in Canada isn't from Ceylon, I started using cinnamon from Ceylon about three years ago, it's available in health food stores.

How long did it take you to acclimate yourself, after getting used to the strong Cassia Cinnamon flavor?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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