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Do you drink beer out of the proper glass?
#1
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Do you drink beer out of the proper glass?
 
 
One answer is probably “who cares?”  
 
 
I’ve drunk beer directly from the bottle or can, or “on tap” in whatever cup was handy including coffee mugs.
 
However, there are some who somewhat do and will claim that a certain beer, or type of beer, say Stella Artois, should only be enjoyed out of a Stella Chalice.  
 
Searching the Net, I find that there are essentially 4 points of view:
 
1.  Those who don’t care, just drink your beer and enjoy it.
 
2.  Those who just like to express their opinion, such as myself, who really have no “beer credentials” other than I’ve actually had a beer.  Once.  Or twice.  Who’s counting?
 
3.  Those who might actually be called beer aficionados and actually have some expertise in the subject.
 
4.  Those who work at/for an organization that sells glassware.  Here you’ll find, not surprisingly, that the correct glass for a specific beer/type just happens to be one that the sell.  How fortuitous!
 
 
 Not surprisingly then, those that we would accept as beer “experts”, do have some recommended, proper, glassware for certain types of beer.  
 
(At this point, those that are interested will Google “proper beer glassware” and become depressed knowing that they are using the wrong glass for their beer and are missing out on that woody hops nuance that the brew master so painstakingly included.)
 
In general, if you could have only one glass for beer, it should be the one that does not have a leak anywhere.  Waste not, want not, as they say.
 
Otherwise, the “experts” seem to generally agree that if you only had one type of glass (and many types of beer), that one glass should be something along the lines of a “Duvel Chalice”.  While not perfect for all beers, it may be the least incorrect for some and allows the “expert” enjoyment of most.
 
American Lagers are best, and probably rarely, consumed in a Pilsner glass.  
 
What makes a glass “the best” for a certain type of beer?  Oddly, two very different things.  First, it is the best shaped glass that brings out all those flavors that the brew master wanted to be highlighted.  The second reason has nothing to do with the flavors - it simply hinges on whether the glass (container) is the one traditionally associated with the beer even if it does absolutely nothing to enhance the taste.  A really great example of this is the German beer stein with lid.  Supposedly, the lid was designed to keep the flies out of the beer.  Apparently German flies don’t care about the proper beer glass either.
 
My overall opinion is that while the proper glass really does matter, for most of us it really doesn’t matter.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#2
The one opinion I heard at the Stroh's bottling plant in Detroit, was you drink beer in glass mugs or pilsners - but never wash those glasses with soap. Most taverns around here have simple glass tumblers, pillsners, or mugs. Aficionados chill their mugs. Some salt their beer, and some add honey.

See Here.
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#3
I'm a former home brewer, and made my own beer for decades.  I even ended up making it from whole grain, just to see if I improved the quality of the product.   If you are a real purist, you will naturally think it is best, and if done correctly, offers the greatest flexibilities.  

I got pretty good at it, and produced some excellent brews, but finally gave it up because it just takes too much effort.   My lagering cooler(floor freezer) is now my outfeed table for my tablesaw.  

The only stickler I ever made for drinking implements were my collection of real German glasses and steins I collected in Germany during the 60s.  Otherwise, I have no real preference for drinking implements.  But I do prefer bottles to cans, and have no problems drinking right out of the bottle.   But if I do happen to drink a can of beer, I always pour it into a glass or mug.  A good head is nice and it gets out a fair bit of the carbonation right up front.

Believe it or not, I really don't drink beer anymore, and have resorted to green tea as my regular drink of choice.  Shock
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#4
I guess I fit within the aficionado category, since I have been through all the minute steps in making beer from beginning to finish.  

Having lived in Germany and traveled with my German American friends, we traveled all over the place and drank all the local beers from everywhere we went.  I've even been to Prague and enjoyed the king of pilzners,  Plzeňský Prazdroj, known in the West as Pilsner Urquell.  Gambrinus also makes an excellent alternative for visitors to Prague.  Drinking either fresh is like heaven on earth, I kid you not.  But it does not travel well at all, and the Pilsner Urquell you get here in the US is old(less than a month) and not up to snuff.  Incidentally, my Mom has a few of the PU glasses we bought there, back when Prague was behind the Iron Curtain.

This is my favorite glass for drinking pilzner.  Historically, this one is the Real Deal.

[Image: 31FCdJWN2xL.jpg]

The ones my mom still have are like that, but are old enough that they still have the "Plzeňský Prazdroj" label.  They are true collector's items.  Drinking true pils does look best when consumed in a thin walled glass that brings out the true color of the very special Moravian Malt and Saaz hops, which makes up true Czech Pilzner.  It makes a head that is a pleasure to admire.  

However, since I can no longer enjoy the best pilzner in the world, I have relied on Vienna style lager, which is well represented here in the Northern Hemisphere.  Its full bodied, far more stable,  and ranges from amber to dark amber.  There are a lot of great ones here, but my two favorites are Negra Modelo, and Samuel Adams Boston Lager.  Both have different shades, and texture, but the taste is identical.  On a taste test, I cannot tell one from the other, and with other beers mixed in with them, I can always point them out, but can't tell which one is which.  I've always liked to mix up the two, because my moods change, but my taste doesn't.

Oh, and I can enjoy them in a bottle or a glass, makes no difference to me.  But I Never drink either of them canned.    That is far more important than which glass to use.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
(04-15-2016, 11:34 PM)John L Wrote: Oh, and I can enjoy them in a bottle or a glass, makes no difference to me.  But I Never drink either of them canned.    That is far more important than which glass to use.


I recently toured the local Yuengling Brewery in Tampa and they pointed out that exactly the same beer went into both their bottles and cans.  When they sample beer from both it will taste exactly the same initially.  However, unfortunately, beer is somewhat damaged by some light and after time beer in a bottle may no longer maintain its original flavoring. 

This is why beer from a bottle may taste different than the same beer from a can - provided they are both poured into glasses.  The bottled beer may have been affected by light and is "skunked".

Drinking directly from a can may add some form of metallic taste or worse taste from possible contaminants on the can - not that that has ever stopped me.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#6
JW, with bottled beer, that is why the glass is heavily tinted, in order to cut down on ultra-violet radiation.  For a long time, it seems Miller Brewing never got the message.  Beer should always be stored in a dark place to begin with, then there is no problem with radiation from the sun.   The only beers I buy in a can are those that I cook with.  

But like I say, I have pretty much given up on just about all drinks, with the exception of green tea.  Its just healthier, easy to make in two gallon pot, and then store in the fridge, and it tastes great with mint and Splenda.   Its also very healthy, so I have pretty much stuck with that.  I buy my mint by the pound, at Amazon, place it in two "unbleached" coffee filters and toss them in the hot pot with eight family size tea bags.   It makes fantastic tea, and I constantly get compliments on it.  S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#7
Perhaps "beer tea" might be just the ticket!

S6
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#8
We are currently buying "Tradewinds" Sweet Tea by the gallon at Krogers. Best taste I've found yet. But coffee is still my mainstay.
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#9
Hope you use the proper glass for it.

S1
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#10
The current trend at restaurants is ice tea served in glassware that looks like Ball jars used for canning. All I care about is that they are bottomless.

[Image: 418oJZa2ZXL.jpg]

For coffee, my son's family on Tennessee had a Yeti-styled coffee thermos mug made for me. It is a 30-oz mug coated with Blue enamel with a Maize Wolverine logo baked on the side with "Mr. Bill" baked on the bottom.

[Image: 10372902.jpg] + [Image: Michigan-Logo-300x220.png] + [Image: 9951684895_cefbe8a821.jpg]
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