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The Future of Education
#1
Here's an interesting article from the Atlantic about the future of college. What are your thoughts?

Quote: The price of content will freefall over the next seven years. We heard the first rumblings last year when the Supreme Court ruled that U.S. copyright owners may not stop imports and re-selling of copyrighted content legally sold abroad, paving the way for a global market for textbooks.
The supply of learning content will swell. This might sound counterintuitive, but as we move toward a global market for content, creators will be price takers, unable to command much negotiating power given the sheer scale of distribution platforms (think iTunes). While it may make less sense for a professor in New York City to write a book, it makes a whole lot of sense for one in Mumbai.
Education will be personalized. With learning content available on demand, students will increasingly be able to build degree programs from a wide variety of institutions offering particular courses.
Universities will be masters of curation, working as talent agencies. They’ll draw royalties and license fees from the content professors create and curate. In many ways, the role of the best universities will become even more focused on identifying, investing in, and harvesting the returns from great talent.

Quote:Students are the big winners here. Decreased cost of content combined with increased competition among professors, and lower average ROI for universities per professor, will lead to lower tuition costs and greater choice.Great professors with interdisciplinary knowledge—the great curators—will see license and royalty fees go up as they command economies of scale in distribution. Existing institutions with large endowments will become the record labels: platforms that invest in great talent. And distribution platforms that curate content will do well, commanding both economies of scale and scope.

Meanwhile, average professors will find their incomes shrinking and their job insecurity growing. The ranks of professors will quickly diverge into the 1% and everyone else. Second tier institutions that cannot invest in talent or great content will find it harder to cover operating costs given downward pressure on tuition pricing. Those without endowments must change dramatically or go out of business. For-profit, publicly traded universities will be squeezed between increased student expectations and declining revenue; they may increasingly compete as content creators against some of today’s large publishers.

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/arc...ls/374012/
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#2
Learning is learning. A bright student can learn on his/her own.

The main usefulness of college is socialization - but not the political indoctrination part. Believe it or not, the fraternity and sorority system really gives the Greeks a step up on success. Just like in High School - it is all about extra-curricular activities, not necessarily grades.

You can learn on your own - positioning one's self for a successful career and life is very useful.
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#3
With online education, I can't imagine it NOT having a huge impact on education over time. I've taken OT theology courses online, I get to ask as many questions as I want to and get answers to all of them individually.

I couldn't do that if I was at UT for example.
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#4
"Learning is learning. A bright student can learn on his/her own."

Not always, no. In fact, that is a dangerous belief that has led to a decrease in the quality of education. Many people are very intelligent, but need mentoring to learn. Furthermore, education is not just about socialization, but about having the chance to meet and learn from those who are established in their fields.

I really resent our society's "do-it-yourself" attitude towards everything. it is really just a way for corporations to make money by not offering good service.
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#5
(08-06-2014, 12:06 PM)Anonymous24 Wrote: "Learning is learning. A bright student can learn on his/her own."

Not always, no. In fact, that is a dangerous belief that has led to a decrease in the quality of education. Many people are very intelligent, but need mentoring to learn. Furthermore, education is not just about socialization, but about having the chance to meet and learn from those who are established in their fields...

Absolutely false. It is the mentoring that does most of the damage. Can you imagine the career path of students from Ward Churchille's classes who were told untruthfully that the American government gave diseased blankets to Native tribes in order to kill them off?

Think about Andrew Dickson White, running for the Presidency of Cornell, who lied about Christopher Columbus.
It was Andrew Dickson White who Wrote:The warfare of Columbus [with religion] the world knows well: how the Bishop of Ceuta bested him in Portugal,; how sundry wise men of Spain confronted him with the usual quotations from Psalms, from St, Paul, and from St. Augustine; how, even after he was triumphant, and after his voyage had greatly strengthened the theory of the Earth's sphericity... the Church by its highest authority solemnly stumbled and persisted in going astray... the theological barriers to this geographical truth yielded but slowly. Plain as it had become to scholars, they hesitated to declare it to the world at large... But in 1519 science gains a crushing victory. Magellan makes his famous voyage. He proves the Earth is round, for his expedition circumnavigates it... Yet even this does not end the war. Many conscientious [religious] men oppose the doctrine for two hundred years longer.
Every history book recounts how Columbus fought the religious extremists who used the Bible to decree the Earth was Flat. Name a Progressive who knows any different!

White lied. He was running for President of Cornell and admitted he wrote this to "get even with his Christian critics of his plans for Cornell." Every educated person of Columbus's time knew the earth was round. This includes Roman Catholic theologians. The Venerable Bede (ca. 673-735) taught that the Earth was round, as did Bishop Virgilius of Salzburg (ca. 720-784). Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), and Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274), and all four became Saints. It was part of an ages-old conspiracy of atheists to portray Religion as being anti-Science. Columbus was not argued out of sailing off the edge of the world. The scientist of his day knew the world was round - but much larger than Columbus estimated. He put Japan at being only 2,080 miles from the Canary Islands, but the "sundry wise men of Spain" knew it was over 14,000 miles. Had Columbus not run across an unsuspected continent - his crew would have all died at Sea.

The effect of tenure has made bad teachers untouchable. True, socialization is not everything - just the most important thing. You are right that "...having the chance to meet and learn from those who are established in their fields" is correct, but also understand the adage: "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach."

One may always learn from good teachers - but it is more important to vet the bad teachers and refuse their indoctrination. ...That one must do on one's own.
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#6
Hey, JohnL what say ye about this?
'It's not who votes that matters, it's who counts the votes'  |  György Schwartz, Budapest, Hungary
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#7
(12-06-2016, 04:20 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: Hey, JohnL what say ye about this?

Oh Jesus........................... Shock
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#8
The best thing about that, is suddenly you have a range of new presents you can buy for Military School grads: lap desks, pencil sharpeners, and sets of colored pencils.
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#9
(12-06-2016, 04:20 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: Hey, JohnL what say ye about this?

Let's revisit this again Ronald.  I suspect that the highly contested nomination, and close vote on Secretary DeVos is telling.  As for the Jackasses, they have fought this harder than anyone else up to this point.  Little Chucky Shumer has done everything he can in order to make this a fight in the gutter.  But fortunately, she has made it and the Jackasses have lost this round.  I will guarantee you that they will fight everything she attempt to accomplish because one of their biggest cash cows is the Teachers Union.  I don't have any idea how much flows to them, but it is in the many millions of dollars.  

Betsy DeVos Confirmation Teaches Progressives the Value of Homeschooling

And its what DeVos is championing that has them kicking up their heals and braying so loudly: School Choice.  And that included home schooling, like that black mother who was arrested for home schooling her two children.  This is going to be a "War Without End" as long as the teacher unions have so much money to throw around.  

5 Great Reforms Betsy DeVos Will Bring to the Department of Education

However, unionized teaching has proven itself to be less than marginal and that alone is going to do them in.  There is little or no chance we will be able to remain ahead unless we properly educate the young, who will be entering the work force in the future.  And they must be properly prepared, i.e. educated as they should be.  

[Image: lb170208cd20170207093007.jpg]

the unions have too much money for throwing around, and it leads to corruption and protectionism, instead of excellence as the objective.  If this doesn't change, they will be on the long term losing end of the equation, as they rightly should be.

And another front on this war will be Common Core, with which Betsy wants to do away.  And her views are exactly the same as are Trump's.

Betsy DeVos on Common Core, 'I am not a supporter - period'

Donald Trump On Education


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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
It's going to be a long, hard grind. Many friends I grew up with who are now teachers are adamantly opposed to anything DeVos.
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#11
(02-09-2017, 07:29 PM)WmLambert Wrote: It's going to be a long, hard grind. Many friends I grew up with who are now teachers are adamantly opposed to anything DeVos.

Its called "Self-Interest", and it works on all of us, no matter how short-sighted.  The key is to recognize this and make the hard decision that offering the student the best education is the true mission of the teacher.  

Our education system has to change dramatically, or we will continue to fail in the job of helping the next generations be the best they can be.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#12
(02-09-2017, 07:39 PM)John L Wrote:
(02-09-2017, 07:29 PM)WmLambert Wrote: It's going to be a long, hard grind. Many friends I grew up with who are now teachers are adamantly opposed to anything DeVos.

Its called "Self-Interest", and it works on all of us, no matter how short-sighted.  The key is to recognize this and make the hard decision that offering the student the best education is the true mission of the teacher.  

Our education system has to change dramatically, or we will continue to fail in the job of helping the next generations be the best they can be.

True. And I agree. What I see, is that all the public school teachers have intrinsic programs and curricula that are important to them, but unknown in the Real world. To them, since the Home-schooler crowd doesn't have special training in these esoteric things, they don't know squat. An example is the concept of teaching to progress or to accomplishment. To them a 5th grader raising his reading level from a 3rd Grade level to a 5th grade level is diametrically opposed from a 5th grader reading at a 7th grade level. When DeVos said something in her committee hearing about improving reading levels, they went crazy, and called her ignorant.
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