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I Just Bought A New Lawnmower. It's.................
#21
My wired electric lawn mower died definetly yesterday. The engine is not rotating anymore.

So I was looking for a cordless one but the guy at the garden utility store STRONGLY recomanded NOT to buy this. "It's too ealry"
He told me that it's nice the first two years. Then the batteries gets used out, through charging-discharging cycles or simply through planified obsolecy and you need to buy new batteries which cost the same as the whole lawn mower.
In two years of time, expect to fork out another 400 or 500 €/$ for new batteries.

The other problem is that most of cordless lawn mowers here had smal diameters. And the price of the two larger models were over 780€ or 820$. There was even one at 340€... not including batteries! LOL.
So I decided to buy one with a cord, at 240€ (270$). Yes, I know, I will still drag this f**cking wire for another 10 years. But I realy can't afford the cordless one now. And I realy need a large blade diameter because the area is quiete large.
Anybody with a garden as I have would buy a gasoline one or a riding one. But I don't want anything to do with thermic engines.
My electric lawnmower lasted 15 or 16 years with only cosmetic repairs which I could do myself.

The good thing with the lawn mower I want to buy is that it has a metalic corpus like the gasoline ones. Plastic tend to crack over time and electric lawn mower are build with weaker parts. This one seems robust.
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#22
Fred, I suspect it will outlast me.  Mine came with two 40V batteries.  It was supposed to come with both of them the same amperage, but they were from the previous year.  One was of higher amperage, and the other lower.  I told the company that they sent me the wrong batteries, and they shipped me a replacement batter of the higher amperage kind.  So, I now have two batteries that are new and unused.  I use one of the larger batteries, and I get a good 6-7 mowings per charge.  When the unit stops, I just pop it back into the charger and it is fully charged in less than an hour.  

Also, there are Youtube sites out there that teach people how to get more life out of a lithium battery.  And, there are also some sites that show you how to replace the individual lithium cells within the unit, and make a brand new battery.  And you can do it all yourself.  Try these videos right here.

I know this is about a NiCad batter, but the principle is the same with Lithium Ion batteries as well. To Hell with the cord, I'll go with the battery packs any time, and fix them when they wear out.







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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#23
In addition to holding a much greater charge, and being able to charge more quickly, lithium ion batteries also last longer in terms of charge/discharge cycles, than the old nickel cadmium batteries and also the older lead-acid car batteries. I don't know the exact figures. If you can get 6-7 mowings out of a charge, that is great. Maybe your yard is smaller than our half-acre suburban lot, but still that sounds pretty good. Golf carts typically use lead-acid car batteries, but they'll still go about 20 mph for seven miles on a charge. I used to use one when I was picking up litter at a local shopping center. (In my life, I have earned money by litter as well as literature.)

But gas-powered riding mowers remain more economical. One gallon of gas will mow our lawn twice. Walk-behind mowers will go even further on a gallon of gas--but you have to add the legwork.

If there is a doctrinal reason to prefer electric over gas operated mowers, consider whether you are really saving anything by using electricity that is generated by power plants that burn coal or natural gas. Despite the advances in battery technology, gas tanks still are more efficient at storing energy than batteries.
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#24
(05-20-2016, 07:15 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: If there is a doctrinal reason to prefer electric over gas operated mowers, consider whether you are really saving anything by using electricity that is generated by power plants that burn coal or natural gas. Despite the advances in battery technology, gas tanks still are more efficient at storing energy than batteries.

Of course there is a 'doctrinal' reason for this. They're a pain in the ass, and are as much trouble as an unruly female. In fact, lawn mowers have a real tendency to be sexed out as "female" lawn mowers. They're contrary, work only when they want to, and just when you think you have them under control, they start a new period cycle.

Gasoline is just the least of the problem. There is oil, spark plugs, excess pulling exercise, frustration and loss of religion when the bitch refuses to function. And they also reek of gasoline and oil.

Oh, and with the battery powered mower, I can take my air compressor, blow it out completely, then fold it up and stand up next to the basement door, beside the air compressor. No need to worry about the bitch sitting in the elements or under the house. My babe is always inside the basement when not in use. I like that. S22
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#25
I have always found that the simpler the lawnmower, the more reliable. We always get a basic, no frills mower as a backup, for mowing the tight spots the riding mower cannot reach. I have found that year after year, it literally starts on the first pull. It might need oil once in three years, and the spark plug regapped every six years or so. And the simpler mowers are the cheapest, too!
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#26
(05-20-2016, 11:16 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: I have always found that the simpler the lawnmower, the more reliable. We always get a basic, no frills mower as a backup, for mowing the tight spots the riding mower cannot reach. I have found that year after year, it literally starts on the first pull. It might need oil once in three years, and the spark plug regapped every six years or so. And the simpler mowers are the cheapest, too!

Congratulations Ron, you have a "good ole' Boy" lawnmower.  Its a keeper, so don't get rid of him.   S22

In my case, I'll stick with the simple part.  The battery powered mower is very easy, and any dummy can run it once he remembers to push the start button first.  Plug in charged battery, press button, and pull back starting handle bar.  Only about 20-25% the noise of a gasoline powered mower.  Weighs less than half that of a regular mower. And I can mow early in the morning, and never have to worry about waking the neighbors.  

And like I said, I fold it up and store it upright, between my basement door and the air compressor.  No dripping oil or gas.  And it takes up about 1.6 sq ft of floor space.

I Love It!! S25
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#27
I just cannot tell you all how much I LOVE this battery powered lawn mower.   Its 92 degrees F, and I got a wild hair.  So I took out the mower, and mowed the front lawn and part of the back yard, in less than a half hour.  I did work up a little bit of a sweat, but absolutely nothing had I been pushing a heavy gas powered mower, and if the damned thing had refused to start, I would have been hot before even starting out.  

I just LOVE this little lady.  She purrs like a kitten. The only way I would ever go back to a gas burner is if I had a huge lawn of an acre or bigger.  Then I would go with the riding mower.  

If you are ever in the market for a replacement mower, the battery mower is the way to go.   S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#28
The self-propelled walk-behind mowers make work much easier, since you don't even have to push. But they are more complicated, and break down more frequently.
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#29
(06-11-2016, 04:22 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: The self-propelled walk-behind mowers make work much easier, since you don't even have to push. But they are more complicated, and break down more frequently.

One other thing. Everyone who uses a mower will always miss some grass getting cut, and have to rock the mower back and forth to get it realigned in order to cut that misses part. With the much lighter battery mower, this is a breeze, it is so light weight.

Unless one has had the chance to use both types, it is difficult to appreciate the difference in weight and noise level. Its simply amazing.

Naturally its not perfect; nothing ever is. It lacks the raw power of the gas engined mowers. But even is it fails to cut a bunched clump on the first pass, it is so easy to come back and hit it again, that it is almost not worth any worry. I let my two neighbors, on both sides of the house, use the mower, and also a neighbor two doors up, who is having the usual trouble getting his gas mower to start. All of them swear by this one and say they will definitely be getting one like the one I have.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#30
Soon all the street will want to come to you and try your cordless electric lawn mower. S1
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#31
How about those old Toro mowers that didn't have wheels? They hovered. Never saw one actually cut.

I can't find pictures of the old Toro - buy someone's still making them:

[Image: hover-mower-1.jpg]
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#32
What is meant by "hover"? I don't see any inflated skirt, like an all-terrain hovercraft with an air cushion. Does it slide on a metal guide?
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#33
Look up "Hover mower" in gpix: Here

[Image: hovermower.jpg]
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#34
I have used one, a long time ago. It was an electric one since gas engine are usualy too heavy for that. It's pretty cool. The blades are blowing the air like an helicopter and the mower fly above the ground. It's very easy to use. But it fits only easy jobs, will cut only already short grass, and small areas.
It's too small to seriousely think that you will mow the gulf course shown on the background of the picture above.
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#35
(06-12-2016, 06:12 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: I have used one, a long time ago. It was an electric one since gas engine are usualy too heavy for that. It's pretty cool. The blades are blowing the air like an helicopter and the mower fly above the ground. It's very easy to use. But it fits only easy jobs, will cut only already short grass, and small areas.
It's too small to seriousely think that you will mow the gulf course shown on the background of the picture above.

I agree Fred.  The battery powered mower is the way to go,....unless you have a Huge yard to mow.  But not to worry, even that is about to change with the introduction of new batteries.

Here's what I mean. Spiteful

Best Buy Mowers presents...Husqvarna Rider Battery - Electric Ride-on Lawnmower




John Deere Electric-Converted Lawn Tractor LA115




Tesla of lawnmowers? Meet Cub Cadet's RZT S 42 | Consumer Reports




And this is only the beginning!
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#36
With good enough batteries, an electric mower should be pretty good. Probably a lot less noisy. And electric motors do have good lugging power, for mowing through thick grass. Likely be too expensive for me though, at this point. Besides, Donna and Fred (my sister and her husband) usually mow the lawn now. When I did it, I liked to spread it out over three days, so I got the benefit of exercise for three days. Also I let at least 8 days go by between mowings. They don't like to wait that long. We have about a half-acre yard. With a walk-behind mower, it takes three to four hours. A riding mower takes half that time, and requires less effort, since you are sitting. Fred is a golfer, and I think he wants the yard to look like a golf course. It is far too lumpy and weedy for that.
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#37
No, I didn't buy this, but started checking it out and got interested. All sortsa stuff that are just wierd. Looking at Snow blowers: 100cc stuff are pretty bad, choke up and die with more than 2-inches of snow. 200-300cc are quite powerful. Then I saw this Ariens 926042 Pro Track 28 in. Two-Stage Electric Start Gas Snow Blower 420cc monster for $5k Here Then I looked on Amazon and saw it for $499. Here. I looked deeper and saw it is being sold from a seller in TN. Tennessee? They close school if a snow flake falls. Then I checked another site, and it says: "All in all, we to are show Ariens 926042 Pro Track 28 in Two Stage Electric Start Gas Snow Blower 420cc fou you. This online thespian offer the simplest and tasteless cost which included economise (in U.S.A. ). Version opinions offers you with a overmuch engineer collection of the cons and execs of the Ariens 926042 Pro Track 28 in Two Stage Electric Start Gas Snow Blower 420cc." Here. They will sell 2 for a 1% savings, and 10 for another 1% savings.

Sure looks like a great machine!
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#38
Oh, here's something else: those horrible EPA pieces of crap that are commonly known as gasoline containers.  If you have old gasoline containers, take very good care of them, because the new EPA mandated ones are simply "THE PITS".  This is what government bureaucrats do best: Bugger up something that works.  And if it began in Californicatia, then it just has to be wonderful.   Thats one more reason to want them to secede and just Leave,..........Forever!

But since I now have a battery powered mower, I no longer have need of a large gas can that refuses to work properly. Thank G-d for battery power! S22

If any of you have the new EPA containers, you know what I am talking about.  And why I despise Bureaucrats.  Gah

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSu9QUTa1ja_XNKZycqr8K...5kOvhrD0Sw]
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#39
Totally agree, John. This EPA mandate is an example of creating the opposite of what was intended. I personally have seen people spilling gasoline over themselves trying to use these new, stupid, devices to fill any small gas-driven appliance. The old Chilton gas cans were simple and non-spilling.

For my thinking, the real reason for the law was different than how it was sold. The new devices actually are chiefly designed  to cut down on hydro-carbon evaporation. All that was needed was to put caps on the spouts and vents. In Vegas, OSHA helicopters buzz work sites looking for hydro-carbon emissions, using special detectors that can see the cloud from poorly sealed containers of tar and other products. One ten-gallon open can of tar will throw a spume thousands of feet into the air. The fines are enormous.

[Image: vtg-chilton-p10-gas-can-1-gallon-6-ounce...7b513c.jpg]
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