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Innovative Products
#61
Unfortunately Ebola has the capability to mutate in a way that it can avoid detection... Gah
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#62
It certainly looks as though the new reversible USB Type-C connector, or also known as the USB 3.1 connector, is going to be the upcoming rage in the computer world.

[Image: usb-typec-100539400-large.jpg]
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#63
I received this earlier today, from Gizmo's Freeware, which is a great site for finding practically any best of freeware, no matter the category. And while the innovation of the "differential drive" is no longer new, it is still innovative. And this oldie but goodie does perhaps the best job of describing just how the concept of "differential drive" works.

The initial motorcycle stunts are there for a purpose, even if they are a bit too long. But the rest of the video is a revelation, including the fact that style has a hard time keeping up with substance. S5



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#64
Here is something I find interesting: Batteriser is a $2.50 gadget that extends disposable battery life by 800 percent.

Quote:Bob Roohparvar tells a killer story of industrial espionage. He says the robbery occurred last October at his Batteroo office space in a sprawling Silicon Valley office park. The target was intellectual property surrounding Batteriser, a simple metal sleeve that promises to give consumers up to eight times more life from their disposable batteries, AAA through D.

The crooks clearly knew the building layout, and exactly what they were looking for—namely, a breakthrough technology that, if legit, could blow the lid off an alkaline battery industry that’s worth $3.4 billion annually in the US alone.

The Editor-in-Chief of PCWorld is clearly impressed.

[Image: batterizer_primary-100588462-large.jpg]

Quote:Proving Batteriser actually works

To prove that he’s not peddling snake oil, Roohparvar gave me a demonstration of Batteriser’s effectiveness.

First he ran tests on two “dead” AA batteries with a power meter. The batteries read 1.3 volts each. He then put the batteries inside a Bluetooth keyboard and connected the keyboard to a Mac. An onscreen display reported the batteries were toast. Such is the heartbreak of old-school battery tech. It’s been this way since 1947.

Next he slipped the batteries inside two Batteriser sleeves. He ran the metering test again. The same ostensibly dead batteries read 1.5 volts. He then slipped the batteries—now ensconced in Batteriser jackets—into the keyboard. Voila: The Mac reported the battery level at 100 percent.

Shocking? It shouldn’t be. Again, the basic concepts behind the voltage boost have been employed for years. Batteroo has simply scaled down the requisite hardware to a practical formfactor.

The Batteriser looks fragile, but the sleeve is surprisingly sturdy to the touch. It would never survive deliberate abuse, but it doesn’t feel like wispy metal foil in the least. Batteroo says compatibility testing shows Batteriser works with a wide variety of gadgets including wireless keyboards, game console controllers, TV remotes, digital scales, blood pressure monitors, toys, and (of course) the ubiquitous flashlight.

Granted, simple devices like flashlights will continue to work with alkaline batteries that dip well below 1.4 volts. They’ll just lag and sputter—consider that incredibly dim flashlight that’s on its last breath. But Batteriser promises to keep these devices “topped off,” if you will. Roohparvar says the sleeve will also work with 1.2 volt rechargeable batteries, boosting them up to 1.5 volts.

The Sunnyvale-based company has also verified its technology with the physics department of San Jose State University. “We tested the Batteriser sleeve in our lab and we confirmed that the Batteriser taps into 80 percent of energy that is usually thrown away,” said the university’s Dr. Kiumars Parvin in a statement.

I'm always interesting in scientific advancement, and this one sounds great. Unfortunately, eight times the life of a battery just seems a bit too much, because I'm a natural born skeptic.

So, I started checking around and located others who are also skeptical of the claims. And interesting enough, this item attracted the attention of one of the most unusual electronics experts on the web: David Jones.

I started out watching his Youtube video, where he attempted to give a detailed description of why an 800% saving was totally unrealistic. But I just couldn't stomach his overly enthusiastic adolescent act. So I located the written link, which you can read right here.

And here's the video, if you can make it through all the antics and "Down Under" accent.



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#65
I don't see why the Batteriser could not work. The technical issue is that most alkaline batteries only output 1.5 volts for a while, and when the voltage drops down to 1.4 or 1.32, most devices react as if the battery is dead, because the devices are designed to use 1.5 volts. But in fact, 80% of the original chemical-electric energy still remains in the battery. If the Batteriser works the way it is claimed to, then it simply operates as a simple voltage regulator, that keeps the output of the battery at 1.5 volts, until all the energy is really used up. This certainly seems reasonable to me.

I wonder what effect the Batteriser would have on electric cars. Would it similarly extend the operating life and power output of the vehicle's batteries? If so, then maybe we already can produce all-electric cars with a range of over 200 miles.
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#66
Ron, here's what ShashDot put out from an observer.

Quote:Last week we discussed news about the "Batteriser," a small device that fits around a battery and extends its lifetime. Many of us were skeptical, particularly with the claim that it could extend battery life up to 8x. Now, David L. Jones at the EEVBlog explains exactly why the device won't be as good as its creators claim. The technology itself, he says, does actually work at extending battery life, and has existed for a long time. What this company seems to have done is just shrink it down to a more useful size. Unfortunately, their claims about when a battery stop working and how much energy is left don't really hold up. Batteroo, the company making the Batteriser, claims products stop working when a battery's voltage drops below 1.3v, but a simple test of common household gadgets finds that to be untrue. Further, the percentage of energy left in the battery after this cutoff can vary wildly. Sometimes it will be 80%, but most of the time it won't, and it's frequently 20% or lower for Alkaline batteries. Jones writes, "I'm genuinely baffled as to why Batteroo would need to resort to claims like 8 times life. This thing would still sell like hot cakes if they claimed realistic practical figures. 50% increase in your battery life? – great, countless people would still buy it at the super low price point it's at."

I too found the eight times to be just a bit way out there. It seems they aren't being realistic. Do you really think you should be able to realize an 800% increase in use? Its sort of like hearing and believing what most politicians keep telling us. Shock
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#67
The miniaturized buck-boost sounds cool. I wonder how they pulled that off? Usually you need chokes that generally take up some volume. I expect they found a cool way to flatten them into a plane surface. I agree that the 800% is crap ... but 50% seems pretty salable. Not all that 'sexy' ... but salable ... particularly to somebody whose kid goes through alkaline AAs like popcorn. Shock
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#68
You know, I hate to sound cynical here, but that 800% claim has me thinking of other possibilities as well. In the PC World article I linked above, there is also the reported break-in, along with this picture of the door being jammed into the sheetrock.

[Image: batteroo_office_door-100588691-large.jpg]

I'm not saying that it may not have happened. But it does make for more good PR, making the product a bit more alluring. What do you think?
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#69
Something tells me that this is going to be a Huge hit in the future. Once competition steps in, the price will drop drastically. S22

[Image: Onean-surfboard_dezeen_468_2.jpg]



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#70
I dunno... The whole thrill of surfing is riding the curl. If this is used on calm water, would it be much different than standing on a moving sidewalk? ...or much different than riding the new free-standing segway?





This mini Segway is only $600. The regular segway is around $6,000.
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#71
Who wants one of these?



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#72
(06-15-2015, 10:44 PM)John L Wrote: Ron, here's what ShashDot put out from an observer.

Quote:Last week we discussed news about the "Batteriser," a small device that fits around a battery and extends its lifetime. Many of us were skeptical, particularly with the claim that it could extend battery life up to 8x. Now, David L. Jones at the EEVBlog explains exactly why the device won't be as good as its creators claim. The technology itself, he says, does actually work at extending battery life, and has existed for a long time. What this company seems to have done is just shrink it down to a more useful size. Unfortunately, their claims about when a battery stop working and how much energy is left don't really hold up. Batteroo, the company making the Batteriser, claims products stop working when a battery's voltage drops below 1.3v, but a simple test of common household gadgets finds that to be untrue. Further, the percentage of energy left in the battery after this cutoff can vary wildly. Sometimes it will be 80%, but most of the time it won't, and it's frequently 20% or lower for Alkaline batteries. Jones writes, "I'm genuinely baffled as to why Batteroo would need to resort to claims like 8 times life. This thing would still sell like hot cakes if they claimed realistic practical figures. 50% increase in your battery life? – great, countless people would still buy it at the super low price point it's at."

I too found the eight times to be just a bit way out there. It seems they aren't being realistic. Do you really think you should be able to realize an 800% increase in use? Its sort of like hearing and believing what most politicians keep telling us. Shock


I've put regular AAA batteries in a battery charger and charged them back to their original output voltage, it usually works provided the battery was not completely discharged.
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#73
(08-27-2015, 03:39 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: I've put regular AAA batteries in a battery charger and charged them back to their original output voltage, it usually works provided the battery was not completely discharged.

Do you worry about them overheating and leaking?
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#74
My son is a design engineer who is the Safety Director for his company, who is often flying into China, Winnepeg, Paris,or someplace about billion dollar battery deals, and he told us to not use the battery chargers sold to refresh alkaline batteries. I'll see him this weekend and will ask him about the Batteriser. His company is leading edge in that field.
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#75
(08-27-2015, 04:40 PM)John L Wrote:
(08-27-2015, 03:39 PM)WarBicycle Wrote: I've put regular AAA batteries in a battery charger and charged them back to their original output voltage, it usually works provided the battery was not completely discharged.

Do you worry about them overheating and leaking?

I keep an eye on them and never charge overnight. So far I've never encountered a problem. I never purchase alkaline batteries because they are unreliable when seldom used.
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#76
Most AAA batteries are alkaline. Some are called zero-mercury - but they're still alkaline. There are more than a dozen different chemistries for primary batteries. Secondary batteries like Lithium-Ion are the ones that are safely rechargeable.
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#77
I purchase the ones that are guaranteed to hold their charge for 10 years when not in use, I've been putting them in a battery charger for quite some time when they are low and they always re-charge.
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#78
I believe the problem is heat. I did some checking up this afternoon, after Ronald mentioned it. And on a couple of places, it was recommended never to charge the batteries over one hour at a time. In other words, use a timer to charge one hour, and then cut off, then repeat until fully charged. Alkaline batteries are made to leak under heat, but rechargeable batteries are completely sealed.

If you could find a battery charger that would charge one hour, and then cut off for five or six hours, and then repeat the process, I think alkaline batteries could be used many times. The question is, is it worthwhile, now that the newer rechargeables are on the market. I'm surprised small lithium ion rechargeable batteries aren't out yet.

Here's someone who discusses this.
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#79
Now here's a car that answers many different problems:

New Range Rover is a Fortress
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#80
... but a thief can open it in 20 seconds by hacking the remote control of the lock. S5
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