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Russia to close down NGO's, etc.
#21
Stars & Stripes Wrote:
Quote:IMHO you are spending too much time communicating with russians. Paranoia is contagious disease. I don't know who was the primary source of disease...

My wife and her relatives. Wink1

-S
I wish you all the best... S2 S2 S2
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#22
Stars & Stripes Wrote:
Quote:The Salvation Army is seen as an agent of the CIA and that's insane.

No, that's Russia, filled with possibly the world's most paranoid people. But it does make for good entertainment listening to the conspiracy theories.

-S

you can't conclude that all Russians are paranoid based on the fact that your wife and her relatives are. Some are paranoid some aren't.
This new bill to control NGO's funding, imho is just another source fo bribes for the new Russian beurocracy. They passed the first version which means there will be changes to it before it becomes a law. In all probability it will be left to the discretion of beurocratic officials to judge whether or not the activites of an NGO are political and constitute a threat to the country. Those NGO's that are really intent on influencing Russia's politics will always have the option to tip off those officials so that they'll turn a blind eye to their doings. Russia's bieng run by a beurocracy of dedicated bribe takers and all the laws they enact are aimed at creating more opportunities for bribery. So if someone wants to finance a political party in Russia they'll still be able to do that except that now their spends on tip offs will grow.
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#23
henrylee100 Wrote:you can't conclude that all Russians are paranoid based on the fact that your wife and her relatives are. Some are paranoid some aren't.
Sure, some aren't, if their paranoia is supressed by other mental disorders.
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#24
bh Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:you can't conclude that all Russians are paranoid based on the fact that your wife and her relatives are. Some are paranoid some aren't.
Sure, some aren't, if their paranoia is supressed by other mental disorders.
Well as Mark Twain brilliantly put it

When we realize we're all mad, all mysteries disappear and life stands explained.

And he didn't meet that many Russians in his life by the way.
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#25
henrylee100 Wrote:And he didn't meet that many Russians in his life by the way.
Yup, he meet many americans, it was enough.
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#26
Facing Western Criticism Russia’s Putin Promises Amendments to NGO Bill


MosNews


President Vladimir Putin has ordered his office to modify a bill placing severe restrictions on non-governmental organizations following Western criticism, but he still insisted that the measure was necessary to stop foreigners from interfering in Russian political life, Associated Press reported.
The bill, which already has been approved by the Russian State Duma (lower chamber of parliament) in the first of three required readings, would require local branches of foreign NGOs to reregister as de-facto Russian entities, subject to stricter financial and legal restrictions.
Some groups, such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have said they may have to shut down their Russian operations if the legislation becomes law.
Reacting to a wave of Western concern, Putin has sent Justice Minister Yuri Chaika to discuss the proposed bill with officials from Europe’s top rights body, the Council of Europe. Many Russian NGO activists, including members of the Public Chamber, an advisory body hand-picked by the Kremlin, also criticized the bill.
Putin on Monday gave his administration five days to draft amendments to the bill taking into account concerns of Russian NGOs and advice from European Union experts.
“The main accomplishment of today’s Russia is its democratic process and the civil society’s achievements, and we can’t afford to throw the baby out with the bath water,” Putin told his Cabinet.
He added, however, that “the bill is necessary to protect our political system from outside interference.” He said the measure would also help “protect our society, our citizens from the spread of terrorist and misanthropic ideology.”
Critics say the bill was another step in the Kremlin’s effort to tighten control over society following the abolition of popular elections for governors in Russia’s far-flung regions, effective state takeover of nationwide television and the emergence of a tame parliament packed with pro-Putin lawmakers.
It comes at a delicate time as Russia is about to take over the yearlong chairmanship of the Group of Eight — originally a club of leading Western industrial powers that admitted Russia in the 1990s — with some critics suggesting that Moscow is not suited to such a role because of democratic backsliding.
_____________

Seems like Putin is afraid of something. Whatever it might be?
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#27
bh Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:And he didn't meet that many Russians in his life by the way.
Yup, he meet many americans, it was enough.

I think he was talking of himself, not others' madness. Great men do that....teach by using themselves as an example.
Solo~

When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty. --Thomas Jefferson
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#28
SoloNav Wrote:I think he was talking of himself, not others' madness. Great men do that....teach by using themselves as an example.
May be, but IMHO everybody is mad in his own way. There is russian proverb: "Each of us has his own cockroaches in the head". I'm not sure it's originally russian proverb, cause it's international problem. If it's problem at all...
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#29
SoloNav Wrote:
bh Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:And he didn't meet that many Russians in his life by the way.
Yup, he meet many americans, it was enough.

I think he was talking of himself, not others' madness. Great men do that....teach by using themselves as an example.
so you think when he said we he was using the royal we?, seems highly unlikely to me, I think he was speaking about humanity as a whole, himself included and he was damn right. There was a heavy metal band whose name I forget that had a song whose chorus went
It's a mad house, so they say
It's a mad house, I'm insane.
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#30
henrylee100 Wrote:
SoloNav Wrote:
bh Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:And he didn't meet that many Russians in his life by the way.
Yup, he meet many americans, it was enough.

I think he was talking of himself, not others' madness. Great men do that....teach by using themselves as an example.
so you think when he said we he was using the royal we?, seems highly unlikely to me, I think he was speaking about humanity as a whole, himself included and he was damn right. There was a heavy metal band whose name I forget that had a song whose chorus went
It's a mad house, so they say
It's a mad house, I'm insane.
Whether the royal "we" or himself, he was not taking jabs at someone else while excluding himself, whether those jabs would have been Americans or Russians. He included himself in the "we" which makes it a great statement. Twain had his demons.
Solo~

When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty. --Thomas Jefferson
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#31
You know the old saying "If you can't beat them, join them". It appears some in Russia are going this rout.


http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/20...6/003.html

Quote:Tuesday, December 6, 2005. Page 1.

A U.S. NGO Made in Moscow

By Stephen Boykewich
Staff Writer

Plans are in the works to set up a Washington-based think tank that would be funded with Russian money and combat the U.S. perception of Russia "as a bad pupil," Kremlin-connected consultant Gleb Pavlovsky said Monday.
.................

The nongovernmental organization would correct "an increasingly ideological and propagandistic approach" to Russia on the part of American scholars and commentators, said Pavlovsky, who heads the Fund for Effective Politics, a think tank, and hosts the NTV talk show "Big Politics."

"I think the level of intellectual competency in American programs related to Russia is dropping," he said by telephone. Scholarly and research institutions "are spending their money the way it's easiest to do so: on educational programs teaching bad Russia the right way to behave."

A think tank in Washington would help create "the real debates we need on the most complex, controversial issues" as Russia assumes the chair of the Group of Eight industrialized nations in 2006, he said. "When you're being taught, there's no dialogue."
.........

There's clearly a background for this" think tank idea, Simes said, citing plans for Russia Today -- a 24-hour, English-language news channel funded by the Kremlin -- and increased activity by state-controlled RIA-Novosti as signs of Moscow's increasing concern about foreign perceptions.
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#32
Quote:A State Duma bill that would bar foreign funding for NGOs deemed to be engaged in political activity drew criticism from the U.S. State Department last month. Nearly simultaneously, the Duma voted to allocate $7.4 million to what Duma Deputy Speaker Vyacheslav Volodin called the development of democracy in the Baltic countries. The move was seen as a response to a vote in U.S. Congress to devote $4 million to the development of Russian political parties.
:lol: :lol: :lol:
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#33
Green Wrote:Seems like Putin is afraid of something. Whatever it might be?
Answer in russian:
http://www.ng.ru/politics/2005-12-06/1_udar.html
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