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Salt: another myth shattered?
#1
After 10 years, it emerged that for every extra 2.3 grams of sodium (equal to about a teaspoon of salt) in their urine over a day, their risk of dying fell by 28 per cent. Even though those who ate more salt tended to be fatter, fewer died from "all causes" and, contrary to what we've been told about the dangers of salt to the heart, fewer died from heart disease and stroke.
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The only way to improve public health is to hang all the "scientists" S13
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#2
Well, salt has long been known to work as a preservative....
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#3
Something interesting I just learned. Table salt that you buy at the store today is not really salt, it is industrial waste. Our bodies need sodium to balance potassium levels, but table salt is sodium chloride, not sodium. So, not really all that healthy. Though there are supposedly healthy salts on the market that contain just the sodium.
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#4
Absolutely! Let's switch to eating pure metallic sodium, or perhaps sodium cyanide... gonna be fun! S13
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#5
(12-14-2012, 08:50 PM)2112 Wrote: Something interesting I just learned. Table salt that you buy at the store today is not really salt, it is industrial waste. Our bodies need sodium to balance potassium levels, but table salt is sodium chloride, not sodium. So, not really all that healthy. Though there are supposedly healthy salts on the market that contain just the sodium.

I can't understand how what we buy is an 'industrial waste'? I always assumed we got our salt from salt reservoirs laid down by ocean beds resulting from evaporation.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#6
There is more than one technique but they all amount to mining and purification (you don't want a mineral mix similar to sea salt, it is bitter and vomit-inducing). "Industrial waste" would be prohibitively expensive (world production of salt is around 200 million tons).

Further, chloride part is also needed by all living organisms.
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#7
I normally use kosher salt or sea salt.
'It's not who votes that matters, it's who counts the votes'  |  György Schwartz, Budapest, Hungary
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#8
2112, do you have any idea what would happen if you put pure metallic sodium in your mouth? Here's a clue: Metallic sodium fizzes violently and bursts into flame on contact with water. It dissociates the hydrogen from the oxygen in water, producing heat, which then ignites the hydrogen gas and oxygen gas.

Sodium chloride is salt. Naturally occuring earth salt usually will also have some impurities such as sulfites mixed in with it. Since sulfites can irritate the heart and even trigger heart attacks, sulfites are refined out of salt before it can be marketed for use as a condiment. Sea salt has about a hundred different kind of salts and other trace minerals mixed with the sodium chloride. Some of those trace minerals are heavy metals. So I am not so sure that sea salt is really preferable. In fact, personally, I avoid it.
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#9
I just read something recently about what sources to get your salt. from some woman talking about natural foods (I can't remember where, though). I actually have not done the research on it, just read that some salt is industrial waste. Salt is one of those things I haven't had to find more info about. Yet.
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#10
All this good news about the healthful benefits of salt are still not stopping Mayor Doomberg and his food police in NYC, and how it has led to nation wide lowering of salt in foods

Salt subtly trimmed from many foods amid campaign

Quote:NEW YORK (AP) -- Salt has quietly been slipping out of dozens of the most familiar foods in brand-name America, from Butterball turkeys to Uncle Ben's flavored rice dishes to Goya canned beans.

A Kraft American cheese single has 18 percent less salt than it did three years ago. The salt in a dollop of Ragu Old World Style pasta sauce is down by 20 percent. A handful of honey Teddy Grahams has 33 percent less salt. A squirt of Heinz ketchup is 15 percent less salty.

Their manufacturers are among 21 companies that have met targets so far in a voluntary, New York City-led effort to get food manufacturers and restaurateurs to lighten up on salt to improve Americans' heart health, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Monday. While it's unclear whether consumers have noticed the changes, campaigns aim to get more salt out of the national diet in the coming years - a challenge for an ingredient that plays a role in the taste, preservation and even texture of food.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#11
Rice-a-Roni used to have enormous amounts of salt in it. It was so salty, I couldn't stand it. I had to divide the flavoring powder into fourths, and only use one-fourth of it. I suspect it is because the product was orginally made for people in San Francisco, and since people sweat a lot there, they need more salt. At least that is my theory. In recent years they have cut way down on the salt, though, to better meet the tastes of the rest of us.
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