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miR-941
#1
Now, researchers believe that they have found the definitive difference between humans and other primates, and they think that the difference all comes down to a single gene.

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland attribute the split of humanity from apes to the gene miR-941. They say that the gene played an integral role in human development and contributed to humans' ability to use tools and learn languages.
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The key part:

Quote:Most of the time, when one species diverges from another, that difference occurs because of gene mutations, duplications, or deletions. However, this gene is believed to have emerged, fully functional, from "junk DNA" in a breathtakingly short amount of evolutionary time.

Random appearance of a fully functional major gene is about as likely as chimps typing complete works of Shakespeare ... if you think this through, you would see this as a good argument for creationism.
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#2
In a side note it was written that researchers also discovered that fundamentalist Muslims are also missing gene miR-941.
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#3
With the current technology it should be possible to transfer the gene into another species and see what happens.

Of course, transferring to a great ape would be most interesting, but this is likely illegal.... so anticipate transfers to mice, dogs, monkeys and libs.
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#4
Imagine your dog being able to tell you you're an a$$hole.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#5
I'm still trying to figure out where this Makini Brice gal, pictured below, came up with the evidence that humans share 96% of their genes with "Other Primates". I'm assuming that by "Other" she is including "All" primates? Or just a percent?

Lemurs and tarsiers are also primates, which makes up a large percentage, and somehow I was always taught that lesser primates shared a good deal less.

[Image: 381517_2490271899416_1641621267_n.jpg]
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#6
neither can I and I looked into this. An ad hoc estimate of the worst kind.
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#7
If true, wouldn't this make Darwin's view kaput? Evolution could happen overnight this way, right?

Here's an article on our ancient human progenitors, they don't appear as ignorant as all that to me:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...z27dCiQo85
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#8
Yes, it is a major problem for the evolutionists.

As for the article, 12k ago humans were likely not much different from today's humans.
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#9
(11-25-2012, 05:20 PM)Palladin Wrote: If true, wouldn't this make Darwin's view kaput?

Why? Remember Darwin lived well before science came up with many of its discoveries, such as genes, atoms, etc. He was thinking in generalities, where the simple evolves into the more complex.

And generally speaking, that's pretty much how things go. What he failed to recognize is that evolutionary movement is not uniform. Sometimes a mutation will allow for much quicker development, and sometimes a successful mutation may help in one area, but hinder in others.

Patrick Wrote:Evolution could happen overnight this way, right?

If you are thinking 'overnight' in geologic terms, that is reasonable. But thinking 'overnight' in human terms,....no. It would need some assistance. Take teosinte, as the perfect subject. This is THE classic example of New World domestication of plants and animals. Its development into today's corn, did not occur overnight, but it was the product of constant selective breeding by early man. These things do not occur over night.

[Image: fig_2_ears.jpg]

Perhaps in the near future, when we get gene manipulation down pat, we will be able to apply all this to humans. That is why I think sometime within the next hundred years, we will be able to develop anatomical changes to skin, muscle, bone, and other things, which will allow us to survive more easily in space, and on planets that are inhospitable to us. Of course there are the moral/ethical implications about all this future ability.

Patrick Wrote:Here's an article on our ancient human progenitors, they don't appear as ignorant as all that to me:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...z27dCiQo85

Patrick, early man lived in caves because they offered humans protection from predators, and foul weather. So naturally humans will be exploiting the ability to scratch out places underground. And if there is already a series of passageways available, humans will take stone tools and scrape out the passages into bigger ones. After all most of these caves are into limestone, which is quite easy to tailor.

Have you watched that series on the History Channel, which shows all those underground passages underneath practically every city on the planet? Its where humans go to seek refuge.
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