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Mars
#41
(09-16-2012, 01:36 PM)John L Wrote: One other thing of note. We have discovered, over the last 10-20 years, that the solar system is simply loaded with H2O everywhere. In fact, this planet is bombarded with tons of water daily. That is why we are net gainers of water. I would have to look it up again, but it is over fourteen tons each day, mostly in tiny amounts. But it is still significant.

H2O is very nice in that it provides us with oxygen to breathe, hydrogen to burn in the presence of that oxygen, and water to drink. Ain't that just Peachy? Just load up a large bladder with frozen H2O and take off for a destination. And use all that H2O for numerous things, which can be reused, or harvested 'en route'. If we have a HUGE scoop on the front of the craft, we could capture all those H2O molecules just floating around the solar system, and in the galaxy too for that matter. Again Ain't that just Peachy? S22
You should work at NASA, John. S26
"The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." `Thomas Jefferson

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#42
Ha! I just have a very fertile mind, and am a huge Science/SciFi fan.

And you wouldn't believe the many nights I spent awake in bed, working out how the Space Elevator could be accomplished, from practical space suits, to DNA enhancement, to O'Neill Cylinders, to how the tether ribbon could best be attached, where they will be built first, and how they will affect our dispersion into the solar system.

All that is seriously missing is how to mass produce carbon nanotubes for cable, construction framing, and sheeting. And also how to use DNA enhancement so as to keep our muscles from atrophying under micro-gravity. And lasty, how to produce space suits that can also act as regular clothing. Again a synthetic fabric that is made from sheets which have the ability to electrically open and close thousands of flaps: open for air circulation, and close for air tight sealing. And they would have the ability to absorb, or reflect light too.

Those three things: nanotube technology, dna enhancement, and comfortable clothing/space-suits, are the key to success in space.
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#43
How much H20 escapes from the outer atmosphere daily?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#44
Valles Marineris (Mariner Valley) on Mars, was clearly created by the action of water. It is similar to the Grand Canyon, except that if it were in the U.S., it would stretch from the east coast to the west coast.

   


.jpg   MarinerValleyOnMars3.jpg (Size: 10.3 KB / Downloads: 102)

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valles_Marineris

Icy mist over Mariner Valley on Mars (1997 photo):

   

Link: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap971017.html
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#45
(09-16-2012, 04:28 PM)jt Wrote: How much H20 escapes from the outer atmosphere daily?

Not really sure today. I do remember reading somewhere about all that. And yes, we do lose water. But the net result is that we gain a goodly amount on a daily basis.

If you listen to the Small Comet folks its considerable. But I think it is somewhere between their estimate and zero. If I recall what I read, its somewhere around 14 tons of water vapour daily. I could be wrong, but it doesn't amount to all that much on a daily basis. However over thousands of years, it really does add up. But since the planet is currently fluctuating between glacial periods, and interglacials, the sea level is constantly going up and down, so the net result is hard to pin down accurately. But we are adding on an ongoing basis.

I really need to go back and restudy this issue again. But there is just so much new scientific revelations being brought up that I just don't have the time anymore. Sigh................
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#46
Ron, that's true. But those weathering effects of the hillside in the photo, are the result of wind and sand, not water. There would have had to be so much water there, moving from one location to another, that it would still be easy to recognize.
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#47
But you don;t find a lot of water nowadays een if millions years ago canyon where dug by rivers larger than the Amazonia.

And this is because of the lack of atmosphere, due to the low gravitation.
Mars is stoo small to retain an atmophere for a very long time. Maybe it had one but today it's only 1% of the atmosphere on Earth, in other words: nothing.

Once the atmosphere has disapeared or is absent, water is gotta go too. Because the lower the atmospheric pressure the faster water boils and get away in vapors.
At the top of Mount Everest water boils at 90C already.
On Mars it vaporizes immediately by the first sunrays.
Then the same sunrays or sun wind, blow the water particles away in the outer space.

The only way to find water is underground where sunray don't light. Before we extract our first gallon of water, we first need to send an excavator there to dig between the rocks.
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#48
What is interesting is that as the solar system ages, planets such as mars, will naturally keep shedding their reservoirs of water. And the reason for this is that the objects that carry large amounts of water, comets, and asteroids, are becoming less abundant. Most of them have already impacted on other planets or into the sun. The younger the solar system, the more Impactors flying around.

And because they have less gravity, they tend to lose the H2O that constantly enters their atmosphere daily. There isn't enough gravity to keep the molecules there. But all the underground water is still there, and only ocassionally roils up, pouring down slopes and back into the underground reservoirs. Only there is just a little less going back in with each pouring out. In a few billion years, almost all of that H2O will also have evaporated out of the atmosphere.

Fortunately the earth has sufficient gravity to keep more that comes in, than leaves.
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#49
(09-17-2012, 02:04 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: XXX

I'm sorry, but......?
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#50
John, I tried to delete the post, but found that I couldn't. I couldn't even blank out the post, unless it had at least three characters. I was going to post a larger image of the globe of Mars showing the hemisphere with Vallis Marineris, but then I realized it was the same image I had appended earlier, just larger. Feel free to delete the post if you wish.
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#51
Mars rover Curiosity finds proof Mars had water
"The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." `Thomas Jefferson

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#52
(09-27-2012, 06:36 PM)Grizzly Wrote: Mars rover Curiosity finds proof Mars had water

You mean 'flowing waters', right? We already had lots of proof that water existed on the planet. Its just that that was an established stream bed. There is a big difference between 'presence', and 'flow pattern' I suspect. S5S22
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#53
(09-27-2012, 07:40 PM)John L Wrote:
(09-27-2012, 06:36 PM)Grizzly Wrote: Mars rover Curiosity finds proof Mars had water

You mean 'flowing waters', right? We already had lots of proof that water existed on the planet. Its just that that was an established stream bed. There is a big difference between 'presence', and 'flow pattern' I suspect. S5S22
Thought it would be an interesting article to add, John.S22
"The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." `Thomas Jefferson

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#54
Yeah, I really get interested in those sort of things. Obviously there is a whole lot of water under the surface of the planet, and the total amount is only dependent upon the amount of underground cisterns/caverns/lava tubes. I'm betting that there is an HUGE amount of water there.
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#55
Mystery Mars Object is Curiosity's Litter
"The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." `Thomas Jefferson

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#56
Now... aliens preparing to landing on Mars will know what humans think about most of the time and our source of pride...

[Image: 12004_499837940070028_371432500_n.jpg]
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#57
India to Mars
[Image: ?m=02&d=20140924&t=2&i=976136499&w=&fh=&...XNPEA8N0UI]
Notice the big difference with islamic countries?
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#58
(04-24-2013, 04:00 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: Now... aliens preparing to landing on Mars will know what humans think about most of the time and our source of pride...

Remember Fred, Mars has an atmosphere and winds, which create dust storms. Those tread marks may already be gone by now. If not, they certainly will be soon. S5
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#59
You didn't read my question below the picture above!!!
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#60
(09-26-2014, 05:59 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: You didn't read my question below the picture above!!!

Fred, I wasn't referring to that picture. I was referring to the one above it, the one with the rover tracks. In reference to your sentence above the picture, I stated that by the time aliens go there to see all of the back and forth, round and round driving of the rover, the mars atmosphere will have totally erased the tracks, due to their huge dust storms.

I purposefully left out the redundant picture, because it takes up resources. Perhaps I should have included it though? Spiteful
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