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Significant Passings
#21
With the NoKo secrete police watching, one must be very sincere in one's lamentations.

On the other hand, I've read that a rather large percent of the NoKo population actually believe in the propaganda that they have been immersed in for all their lives.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#22
Why wouldn't they be? The literally know nothing of the outside world. They only know what they've been spoonfed their entire lives. if they believed that Jong Il was holding back the wolves of the outside world, they are right in fearing for their future without him.
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#23
Agreed, Ghoulio. Witness the fact that the Cubans who have not been able to escape are largely approving of their gummint.

Early training works, for most people.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#24
Tony Blankley, former editorial page editor of Times, dies at 63
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#25
Why does this not surprise me?
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#26
Penn State killed Joe Paterno.
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#27
You have to wonder if the stress of having his reputation so completely destroyed had some effect. Joe Paterno had long been regarded by many around the country as the best college football coach in history, and suddenly he was an outcast, a pariah. True, he was battling lung cancer, and he was 85. But there is no way that his dismissal and the continued investigation and demonstrations did not have some negative effect, at the very least hastening his demise. I am not saying the university board should not have fired him. But there clearly were unavoidable consequences from this action. It was really the assistant coach who abused children who killed Paterno. "disgusting" begets "disgusting".
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#28
He just gave up on life. This is very common in older people. If you look at the numbers of people who die before and after Christmas, the later is more significant, because people want to live through the holidays. Then when it is over, they say "I'm ready". They just quit.

Same thing here: he quit wanting to live.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#29
You see it a lot in older couples who have been married for so long, that when one goes, the other follows in short order.
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#30
Here is what it means to simply give up. When he exited, she decided it not worth going on,......and she didn't.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#31
(03-01-2012, 11:05 AM)WarBicycle Wrote:
Quote:In Memoriam: Andrew Breitbart (1969-2012)
Andrew passed away unexpectedly from natural causes shortly after midnight this morning in Los Angeles.
We have lost a husband, a father, a son, a brother, a dear friend, a patriot and a happy warrior.
Andrew lived boldly, so that we more timid souls would dare to live freely and fully, and fight for the fragile liberty he showed us how to love.
Andrew recently wrote a new conclusion to his book, Righteous Indignation:
I love my job. I love fighting for what I believe in. I love having fun while doing it. I love reporting stories that the Complex refuses to report. I love fighting back, I love finding allies, and—famously—I enjoy making enemies.
Three years ago, I was mostly a behind-the-scenes guy who linked to stuff on a very popular website. I always wondered what it would be like to enter the public realm to fight for what I believe in. I’ve lost friends, perhaps dozens. But I’ve gained hundreds, thousands—who knows?—of allies. At the end of the day, I can look at myself in the mirror, and I sleep very well at night.
Andrew is at rest, yet the happy warrior lives on, in each of us.


This is a loss for the Right, I really enjoyed reading his Blog.

I am moving this to the original "Significant Passings" thread where it should have been placed. But I can't get it done because this forum software does things the very opposite of how it should be done, and I screwed it up. S4
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#32
I see, or better yet keep hearing over and over, that Ray Bradbury has given up the ghost.

I'm a big SciFi fan, but Bradbury never did anything for me, for some reason. I actually began reading the Martian Chronicles, but had to give up after the fifth, or sixth story. Perhaps today I may think differently, but back then there was something about his style of writing that didn't interest me. Same thing with Frank Herbert.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#33
Actually, I both agree and disagree. I never rated Bradbury up there with the other masters - even though he was classified with them. Most critics put him up with Heinkein, but we who read the genré know better.

With Herbert, I also never liked any of his books after Dune, but liked that one enormously. Hde also wrote The White Plague which was okay.
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#34
I agree: a Heinkein went down far easier. S5
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#35
Bradbury was on the Left side of the world. That's why you don't like him.

I for one like P.K. Dick most of all.
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#36
Had no idea what Bradbury's politics were. I just wasn't interested in his writings.

No question Dick was a great one. I just couldn't handle him on a continuous basis. I found he worked best for me in small doses. S5

I remember reading the "Second Variety" when I was about fourteen years old, and I had nightmares over it for years. And remember, that was during the late 1950s, at the height of the Cold War.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#37
Ray Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit 451, which is a far more memorable classic of science fiction than The Martian Chronicles. The work--where books are banned and people memorize the classics of literature--reminds me some of the Waldensians who lived during the more than 1,000 years when copies of the Bible were forbidden to the people, especially written in the languages of the people--who sent out covert agents acting as peddlers throughout Europe who had memorized the Bible, and carried written portions of the Bible concealed in their garments, looking for some receptive soul with whom they could share what they had. Many historians credit this with being what really prepared the ground for the Protestant Reformation.
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#38
(06-07-2012, 09:50 AM)John L Wrote: Had no idea what Bradbury's politics were. I just wasn't interested in his writings.

No question Dick was a great one. I just couldn't handle him on a continuous basis. I found he worked best for me in small doses. S5

I remember reading the "Second Variety" when I was about fourteen years old, and I had nightmares over it for years. And remember, that was during the late 1950s, at the height of the Cold War.

He was excellent but nutty. Paranoic. I have firstly read his "realism" book when I hit it in a library. Cool. Then I found the "Second Variety" and stories. Can't read his Christian stuff or drug ramblings. He reminds me of Bukowski. I dunno maybe because of his hipsterism.
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#39
Bradbury was one of few western writers published behind the iron curtain. Therefore, he must have been a communist. Asimov wasn't, and Heinlein wasn't. Looked up that Stanislav Lem passed away a few years ago, and one of the Strugatsky brothers also.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#40
(06-08-2012, 01:56 PM)quadrat Wrote: Bradbury was one of few western writers published behind the iron curtain. Therefore, he must have been a communist. Asimov wasn't, and Heinlein wasn't. Looked up that Stanislav Lem passed away a few years ago, and one of the Strugatsky brothers also.

In the USSR Asimov, Heinlein, Sheckley, Bradbury, Harrison, Simak were actively published as they were "progressive capitalist writers". Asimov wasn't an emigre. The problem of sci-fi books - they were seldom published and used to be deficit. People typewrited them and lent to each other.

Asimov published works in books and journals in Russian.
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