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Why you shouldn't purchase a Tom Tom GPS
#1
Quote:TomTom caught selling drivers’ GPS data to police

How do police build better speed traps? Well, in Europe, they buy GPS data from satellite navigation giant TomTom.

Some European police departments are getting tips for placement of traffic cameras, and those tips are coming right from inside the cars of drivers via their in-car TomTom GPS systems.

Dutch police said they obtained information from TomTom, a maker of popular satellite navigation devices, while setting up speed traps, prompting concerns by users and an email apology (as well as a YouTube response) from TomTom CEO Harold Goddijn.

George de Boer, TomTom Senior Manager, admitted the company sold users’ GPS data to police, but he said the company didn’t know police were using the information to ambush drivers.

"Our intent was to give that road data to authorities to make the infrastructure better and to make roads better, and to make traffic more safe."

Bernhard Jens, of Utrecht Police, told AP the data remained anonymous.

So far, there are no reports of North American police agencies using TomTom data to set up speed traps.

Outside of Europe, TomTom also sells GPS data to governments in the U.S. and Canada.

Ontario, for example, has used TomTom data in the past to refine evacuation plans for the city of Toronto, according to the Wall Street Journal.

TomTom says it'll be reviewing its policy on data sharing to better protect users' privacy in the future.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNuacLb-FDs

Quote:TomTom satnavs will tell good drivers from bad — and alert your insurance company

MSTERDAM—TomTom satnavs will in future help insurers tell the difference between a good driver and a bad one under a scheme designed to revive the Dutch navigation device maker’s flagging fortunes.

The company, which made its name as a maker of vehicle-based personal navigation devices (PNDs), said it had teamed up with UK-based insurance firm Motaquote to offer its first new insurance product, called Fair Play, which gives the safest drivers lower premiums.

“Our entry in the insurance market with our proven fleet management technology puts us at the forefront of a move that could help to revolutionise the motor insurance industry,” said Thomas Schmidt, managing director TomTom Business Solutions.

Schmidt said the focus in 2012 is to expand the product to other insurance firms in Europe, where he expected thousands of customers to use the plan.

The scheme gives drivers control over their own policy by using driving ability and behaviour to allocate premiums, rather than risk factors used by insurers such as postcode, gender, and age or vehicle, Schmidt told Reuters.

“Drivers using the insurance product will have a TomTom tracking unit fitted in their vehicles, allowing driver behaviour and habits to be monitored by insurers and by improving driving style, you can drive down your premiums,” Schmidt said.

Consumers that agree to the plan will pay for the TomTom tracking kit themselves and start paying lower premiums immediately, providing the driver takes on the feedback from the TomTom tracking device, according to TomTom’s Richard Piekaar.

TomTom’s Business Solutions unit, including its fleet tracking divison, which use the same tracking technology to track and monitor truck drivers, fetches around 5 percent of group sales, or an estimated 65 million in euros in 2011.

Analysts were sceptical about the actual growth potential of the new insurance product but several agreed Tomtom’s move to monetize its rich data base of real time and historical driving data is a good sign.

“It is positive they are looking for alternative business models and are being innovative. Linking the insurance market to telematics is new, but there are uncertainties with regards to the business model,” said Martijn den Drijver, SNS Securities analyst.

TomTom faces intense competition in its core PND market as consumers increasingly opt for free or cheap navigation software as well as cooler gadgets like smartphones and tablet computers.

It is now targeting higher-growth areas and new markets. It increasingly sells navigation devices built into car and truck dashboards, rather than the standalone versions, and sells mapping data and real-time traffic services through smartphone apps and other devices.

TomTom, whose founders have a majority stake in the company, competes in the PND market with Garmin and in the commercial digital map market with Google and Nokia Oyj .

For years insurance companies have been buying a client's wreck from the scrapyard in order to get access to the car's black box to be used against the owner of the vehicle, now they're going to use your GPS data against you. However, there's nothing preventing a family from removing the black box from a car before the insurance companies purchases the car.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#2
We have the latest Garmin, and Carmen tried to get my wife to drive into Lake Mohawk.
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#3
Perhaps it was a marine gps.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#4
I use Mapquest printouts.
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#5
I thought you found your way by charting the stars or something.
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#6
I have a gps in both my car and my boat. I've come back from the lake in dense fog with little difficulty using my marine gps.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#7
I take pics of my maps and directions off Google Earth with my Ipad then view them as swipable pictures, each step in full detail. I can even take snaps of Streetviw if I think the image is recent.
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#8
I use MapQuest whenever I have to make unauthorized trips outside the neighborhood. If I had to listen to all that "Turn Right, Turn Right", I'd throw the thing out the window. I despise nagging women, even when they are giving direction.
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#9
The latest Garmin is great. The verbal info is useful and not too annoying - you can set the levels, and you only hear something when it is needed. The greatest part is the ability to read real-time traffic problems and route us around them before getting stuck. I appreciate the map that shows exactly where we are at any given time.

Coming back from a visit down south one time, we were routed through Kentucky, and the entire expressway was shut down due to a major accident. We were forced off into the hinterlands with no detour signs or population centers to ask where to go. We were basically off the map on back roads, but the Garmin easily routed us back onto the expressway almost 15 miles past the accident at the first entrance to it. The mountains and hills made cell phone communication iffy, and apps don't work without a nearby tower. We could get GPS from satellites.
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#10
Another point, is that the Garmin gives the posted speed limit - even in traffic speed traps, and warns you if the speed cops have set you up before you earn a ticket. It also gives a running ETA as you drive. If you are 10 MPH over the posted speed limit, then you will gain a minute for every 6 miles you drive.
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#11
(02-09-2012, 11:33 PM)John L Wrote: I use MapQuest whenever I have to make unauthorized trips outside the neighborhood. If I had to listen to all that "Turn Right, Turn Right", I'd throw the thing out the window. I despise nagging women, even when they are giving direction.


You can change it to a nagging guy, even change the accent.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#12
(02-10-2012, 12:51 PM)WarBicycle Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 11:33 PM)John L Wrote: I use MapQuest whenever I have to make unauthorized trips outside the neighborhood. If I had to listen to all that "Turn Right, Turn Right", I'd throw the thing out the window. I despise nagging women, even when they are giving direction.


You can change it to a nagging guy, even change the accent.

That is fine, but I am not into guys, much less them also nagging.

I've always been good at map reading, and taught a map reading course in the military. Being oriented to magnetic north, is always a first thing I do by second nature. Once I get oriented to true north, the rest is easy. And a good MapQuest set of directions puts icing on the cake.

Now if I was going into the wilderness, I would carry a GPS device. If I am lost, it is easy to find my device, where I will most likely be in the immediate vicinity.

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#13
(02-10-2012, 01:00 PM)John L Wrote:
(02-10-2012, 12:51 PM)WarBicycle Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 11:33 PM)John L Wrote: I use MapQuest whenever I have to make unauthorized trips outside the neighborhood. If I had to listen to all that "Turn Right, Turn Right", I'd throw the thing out the window. I despise nagging women, even when they are giving direction.


You can change it to a nagging guy, even change the accent.

That is fine, but I am not into guys, much less them also nagging.

I've always been good at map reading, and taught a map reading course in the military. Being oriented to magnetic north, is always a first thing I do by second nature. Once I get oriented to true north, the rest is easy. And a good MapQuest set of directions puts icing on the cake.

Now if I was going into the wilderness, I would carry a GPS device. If I am lost, it is easy to find my device, where I will most likely be in the immediate vicinity.

Thought you might enjoy a Paki telling how to drive.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#14
(02-10-2012, 12:10 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Another point, is that the Garmin gives the posted speed limit - even in traffic speed traps, and warns you if the speed cops have set you up before you earn a ticket. It also gives a running ETA as you drive. If you are 10 MPH over the posted speed limit, then you will gain a minute for every 6 miles you drive.

What I like most about the Garmin is that it advises you to change lanes in anticipation of a turn.

The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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