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Anti Battery Car Article
#41
WmLambert They offer electric cars with solar panels on the roof (not a joke), for $175 000.  S25
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#42
At this time, the practicality of batteries have a limited field. They are less limited than wind power, but until battery technology gets much more powerful and carges much quicker, its still going to be just a sort of thing that only the rich and impressionable will pay for. Its going to happen because battery powered automobiles are small enough and mobile enough to require batteries. But wind power, which is touted along with batteries, is a Lose-Lose, and eventually everyone will realize that the potential harm outweighs the damage it can do to nature.

As for stationary things, such as buildings, batteries will also be impractical unless they are located where a power cable cannot reach. Lets hope that nuclear fusion power plants hurry up and get invented and built. That's the best long term solution. S22
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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#43
Fredledingue Wrote:...They offer electric cars with solar panels on the roof (not a joke), for $175 000.

My nephew was the lead engineer on the solar-powered car from University of Michigan that won the national championship, They took their cat to Australia after winning the North American race, and competed internationally. The cars are interesting, but not really practical.

My youngest son is a design engineer with the number one battery research company in the world. It is their batteries that the race cars use on the Indianapolis 500 track in the all-electric car race every year.

The Tesla car was introduced as a stop-gap, using contemporaneous computer batteries until better technology can be created. They're the biggest up to now, but most other efforts are not very successful.

Coincidentally, Nikola Tesla did invent a vehicle using broadcast power from stations such as Wardenclyffe Tower in Shoreham, Long Island, which was to function as a wireless telecommunications facility and broadcast electrical power. But JP Morgan, who financed the construction of the tower, eventually pulled Tesla's funding. Unable to find additional backers, Tesla was forced to abandon construction of the tower, and never fulfilled his dreams of creating a worldwide wireless electrical energy system. There are apocryphal stories about the car Tesla invented actually working. It was not solar.
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#44
WmLambert Sometimes I read articles about revolutionary battery technology which should come to the market in the next few years. Then nothing happens. It's like technology hit a wall  Banghead
One was phosphore batteries.
What you son or your nephew say about these progress? Is it real or BS?

About Tesla and his power tower, IMO, it was not practical neither. Probably terrible waste of energy, very weak effective power and possibly health effects.
Small wireless energy devices and system supposed to replace wall plugs have been studied 30 years ago. If it worked well, it would have been comercialized. But I haven't seen any so far.
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#45
Fredledingue Wrote:... I read articles about revolutionary battery technology which should come to the market in the next few years. Then nothing happens. It's like technology hit a wall Banghead
One was phosphore batteries.
What you son or your nephew say about these progress? Is it real or BS?

I ask him about every new "breakthrough" in the news, and he has always said how his company has looked into them and found things not mentioned anywhere that makes them less attractive and practical.

Fredledingue Wrote:About Tesla and his power tower, IMO, it was not practical neither. Probably terrible waste of energy, very weak effective power and possibly health effects.
Small wireless energy devices and system supposed to replace wall plugs have been studied 30 years ago. If it worked well, it would have been comercialized. But I haven't seen any so far.

According to those who actually rode in the Tesla-powered car, it did work. Tesla was always far ahead of his fellow inventors, and engineers who said his ideas couldn't work have been completely wrong. There were two separate shows on the Science channel that looked at Tesla's legacy, and both followed the scientific method and tested his ideas. They worked. The greatest scandal is the boxes of papers with his ideas that were swiped when he died (under suspicious conditions.)
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#46
He was by no doubt a genius.

Yet the cordless power transmition would have been impractical for the millions of cars we have today. Maybe it worked as an experiment, in very small range. But I can't imagine how it can apply to millions of vehicles at once and everywhere.
About this I'm fairly sure.
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#47
The biggest problem with the Tesla power tower is that once everyone gets set up on the thing, all it will take is for someone to sabotage the towers and everything will suddenly come to a halt. It would be like something out of a science fiction novel.
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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#48
John L Wrote:The biggest problem with the Tesla power tower is that once everyone gets set up on the thing, all it will take is for someone to sabotage the towers and everything will suddenly come to a halt. It would be like something out of a science fiction novel.
Possibly, but his inventions have a proved record of working, when everyone says they can't.

The biggest problem with the towers wasn't vulnerability, but being free. His backers pulled out when they realized there was no way to charge the end users. If cell towers were sabotaged today, would all iPhones be useless?
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#49
Bill Wrote:
John L Wrote:The biggest problem with the Tesla power tower is that once everyone gets set up on the thing, all it will take is for someone to sabotage the towers and everything will suddenly come to a halt. It would be like something out of a science fiction novel.
Possibly, but his inventions have a proved record of working, when everyone says they can't.

The biggest problem with the towers wasn't vulnerability, but being free. His backers pulled out when they realized there was no way to charge the end users. If cell towers were sabotaged today, would all iPhones be useless?

Not quite the same thing. Obviously Tesla believed his towers would be the only cheap way to make electricity. Today there are other ways to charge my phone(Android phone). I can do so in my automobile, self-charging solar cells, etc. The thing is that the Tesla power towers could have some unforeseen problems that haven't been used. I like 'land lines' the best, because they are more dependable.
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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#50
Tesla's legacy on History Channel

Tesla's energy generation would of course have been the least expensive. Most others, like nuclear or solar or wind still needs distribution and fuel. All have basic investments in amortization to construct, but Teslas Wardenclyffe Towers needed no fuel or distribution costs. There are many forms of energy to date, and the Left is trying to eliminate all the most efficient ones. Get rid of coal, oil, and gas, and that Science Fiction analogy becomes real.

In the History Channel series, researchers duplicated Tesla's energy distribution ideas and proved they worked. They made their own mini-Wardenclyffe tower using home brew equipment. There is nothing to stop such parochial projects. Many believe this Tesla power generation would be geographically limited - but he foresaw towers that covered thousands of miles.

See episodes here

If I was elected President...
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#51
I didn't seen anything showing Tesla in any of the links on the site. Are you sure you got the correct link?
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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#52
The first link was to my post in an earlier thread addressing the Tesla series. The History channels says: "Researcher Marc Seifer recruits astrophysicist Travis Taylor and investigative journalist Jason Stapleton to help unravel the mystery of inventor Nikola Tesla's missing files, which were confiscated by the U.S. government after he died in 1943." Travis Taylor is also a SF author of several novels I really like. He partnered with John Ringo in the Into the Looking Glass series, including Vorpal Blade, Manxome Foe, The Claws that Catch, and Warp Speed.

The second link was to the History Channel's webpage linking to the Tesla series with Travis Taylor.
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#53
[Image: Screen-Shot-2019-09-04-at-1.02.07-PM.png...C408&ssl=1] (Meme courtesy of John L)
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#54
Quote:‘Bet they wish they had gas!’ Chaos in California as Tesla drivers are stranded for hours in a half-a-mile-long line to charge their cars on Black Friday  

Dozens of Tesla drivers in California were forced to wait in an extensive line after what should’ve been a quick stop at a Supercharger station turned into an hours-long ordeal.
Shanon Stellini was travelling through Kettleman City on November 30 when she stumbled across a backlog of around 50 of the electric cars waiting to recharge in a half-mile line outside of at a station near Interstate 5.
‘Bet they wish they had gas’, quipped Stellini’s partner in a video she captured of the chaos - but for the drivers stranded in the stagnant line the issue was certainly no laughing matter.
The Kettleman City Supercharger station - located halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco - is already immensely popular, but even with 40 charging stalls on-site the facility was still overrun by the overwhelming demand that one of the year's busiest travel times brings.
Watt a drag! Drivers wait in half-a-mile-long line to charge Tesl



Our nephew from Denmark visited us last week, he just ordered an electric vehicle but it doesn`t arrive until December 2020. I asked him how long it would take to charge the vehicle at a supercharger station. He said twenty minutes for an eighty percent charge. Can you imagine the lineup on the highways throughout North America should the majority of vehicles be electric vehicles?
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#55
Wonder how many people won't stop at 80% and "top it off"?
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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