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What Did I Come In Here For?
#1
How many times have you gone to another part of the house, in order to do something, only to get there and not be able to remember what you were planning to do? I've had this problem for years, and have always chalked it down to having too many things on my intellectual pallet, that are whirling around, in competition with each other.

Well scientists have come up with an explanation: Walking through doorways causes forgetting, new research shows

Quote:We’ve all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get. Or find.

New research from University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Gabriel Radvansky suggests that passing through doorways is the cause of these memory lapses.

“Entering or exiting through a doorway serves as an ‘event boundary’ in the mind, which separates episodes of activity and files them away,” Radvansky explains.

“Recalling the decision or activity that was made in a different room is difficult because it has been compartmentalized.”

Here's the original study.

Does this make any sense to you all? I have this occur with me a lot, and have always had this happen frequently. But is it something else?
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"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#2
So, if one backs through a doorway, do they remember stuff they never knew?

I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#3
In your case JW,......probably so. S13
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#4
You have stepped into a different universe. The doorway was the portal. As you know, according to quantum theory, new universes are spawned incessantly. Since you are in a different universe, it is no surprise that you forgot what you planned to to in the old universe.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#5
I don't buy it myself. I have this problem and have had since I was old enough to remember. Happens almost daily with me, I now laugh at myself and go on about whatever IS on my mind.

I was born scatter brained.
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#6
(11-21-2011, 06:22 PM)Palladin Wrote: I don't buy it myself. I have this problem and have had since I was old enough to remember. Happens almost daily with me, I now laugh at myself and go on about whatever IS on my mind.

I was born scatter brained.

You may be right Patrick. And then again, they may be agreeing with us, but just taking a slightly different approach to it.

I have what could charitably described as an overly active mind. I have multiple things going on inside my cranium, all at once, and trying to juggle them together with also physically doing one of them tends to get me mixed up. I am so bad at it that I have to write down almost everything I need to do, before I go shopping, or running errands, even if I have mentally itemized them in order. I still wind up bypassing one or more of them.

Its highly frustrating, to say the least. And I suppose this is even magnified in todays highly technical, and complicated multi-tasking, environment. We just simply demand more of ourselves than we did before the industrial/technological revolution.

I suspect this is only going to get worse for us over time, and the need for implanting a computer within the body will eventually be the next step in our evolution. Without an interface with extra computing power, we will be banging our heads against that barrier.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#7
Ever been on a large ship with dozens if not hundreds of hatches, doors, and portals?


I'm not buying it, either.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#8
I'm not sure I go along with this idea, either. Ideas being spawned in one room or another is the least compelling reason to forget things. Train of thought is far more impactful. You think about something because of the environment - Something on the TV, or something you read will get you thinking in a certain direction, and when you stop interacting with what catalyst ginned up your thoughts, your mind will start on other trains of thought.

No big secret research needed - just common sense.

There is another aspect to consider, though. The brain is finite, and can be filled up. There is no such scientific fact that we only use one tenth of the brain's capacity. It is all used, and everything is stored in multiple places. When half the brain is lopped off, a person can still retain all his/her memories - but it is not as easy to access. The reason the human brain is so much slower than mechanical chips, is that the "word" length used to locate ideas is much longer than 8 or 16 digital bits. To find memories, we match "words." I remember reading that the code to understand hearing or seeing consists of incredibly long words, because similar filter "words" can be accessed by humans - while only identical words are used in computers. So we may be thinking about fire hydrants, and "red things" may pop up. Along with Fire hydrants, we'll also have apples and clown noses in the queue. It's more complex than that, of course, because there are multiple cross-over concepts. "Fire hydrant" thoughts will also bring up plumbing, water, and fire-related thoughts.

One of the reasons I prefer using crossword puzzle dictionaries rather than a regular dictionary or thesaurus, is that I can access "similar" words more easily - and the word I need is never the one I already have.
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#9
I'll often go upstairs at work to accomplish X and by the time I am standing there, whatever the thought was is gone. Sometimes it returns later.

I agree, it is frustrating. I probably should own one of those little personal notepad things.
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#10
Multitasking has its down side, right? S5
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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