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The Seven Jobs That Require the Most Education, but Pay the Least
#1
Quick, before you look at this list, Which profession requires the most education, yet pays the least amount of money? After having had to deal with this number one biggest group of losers, are you surprised?

And does this tell you something about the calibre, or reasoning ability, of them?
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"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#2
Some of these jobs are quite technical and I would consider them very useful. And some others I had to chuckle at. Why are the useful ones so low-paying despite projected growth/demand for them? Why does it cost so much to educate for that field? Thank God I am not reliant on student loans.
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#3
The list of best paying jobs keeps changing by the year. This year it is all in the medical profession. But year in and year out, professions such as geologist, biologist, chemist, physicist, and engineer, all do very well, and can find high paying jobs anywhere in the world.

Again, if I was able to start over again, I would obtain a degree in geology. Or perhaps biology. They are both Win/Win professions.
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"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#4
Seems like some jobs get inordinate compensation - just because they are closer to the pocket book. The inventor and owner of a product will slowly get eased out of the top position of a firm he creates, because the financial officers control the purse and decide who to give the high salaries and bonuses to.

It's strange how the engineers and techs who are indispensable get shuffled off to the lower echelons, while the MBA's get the big bucks.

The strange thing is that there are MBA's who never make it because the ones that do get to pick and choose the winners - and they don't want real competition. The Peter Principle ensures that the highest-paid financial officers form an exclusive club of incompetents, whose only skill is being appointed by fellow lightweights.
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#5
Bill, tie that together with Journalism, and how it ranks at the bottom of the economic scale. Please.
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"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
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#6
(11-17-2011, 12:10 AM)John L Wrote: Bill, tie that together with Journalism, and how it ranks at the bottom of the economic scale. Please.

Well, part of it ties together well. Incompetents rise to the top and ensure those around them will do nothing to shake their control of the industry. There are good, decent, and hard-working journalists who fit our mold of what good journalists should be, but they rarely rise to a position of prominence, because they are a threat to the Powers That Be. Anyone who stirs the pot gets ostracized.

Of course, this is made worse by the journalism schools that promote the wrong values and turn out talking heads instead of researchers, and Democrat sycophants.

Remember the child therapist catastrophe of the 90's? There were several child care service providers who spent time in prison, because therapists sat at the front of their chairs when interviewing children who said wild and crazy things, and leaned back bored when the kids said nice things about their sitters. The service providers were painted as abducting kids from pre-school and taking them on 3,000 mile hot air balloon rides to see faraway places, grope the children, then return back to the child care center in time for their parents to pick them up. Before the police learned that the problem was the the sociopathic psychoanalysts, many innocent people were declared to be child abusers.

This same instant feedback exists with journalism schools and editors of news bureaus. The journalists learn the tricks to get ahead - and move away from pure journalism as they do. Their professors have a twisted view of society and teaches that to their students. The same environment waits for them in their news bureaus and editing suites after they graduate. It's a wonder there are any decent reporters at all.

As for the money rankings. The editors and assignment coordinators make the big bucks, and the ground-pounders who do the heavy-lifting make next-to-nothing until their work product enhances the news company - not inform the public.

Same thing with teachers. All teachers have elevated salaries with little merit-based pay - but the bulk of the top salaries are all in administration. My local school district is one of the best in the country, yet all the really good teachers are advanced to non-teaching positions. Teachers work to become principals - but the successful become curriculum administrators or eduction consultants who never see any kids. A bad teacher can stay at the lowest level because the base pay is not bad - but to get larger pay increases, a teacher has to stop teaching. Certainly an oxymoron.
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#7
That lab technician one surprises me. I would have thought that paid fairly well.
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#8
It's all in who sets the rate of pay - not on the services rendered.
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#9
It is not clear to me that those job positions require a college degree. Tech school or on the job training should suffice. Thus, they should not be well paid.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#10
If you ever take a look at John Ratzenberger's web site or go to Center For America, you will see there are plenty of needed skills that are missing from our workforce - and most are not skills taught in BA universities. Most skilled trades have their own schools and accept students on a closed system of legacy and appointment. The hardest trade school that I've heard of is the IBEW trade school. It is very hard to get in a class, and the classes are small.

This is explained because the union hall books are filled with journeymen waiting for work. The dirty little secret is that many on the books are poor workers, and the small number of competent tradesmen with a solid work ethic are fought over. It is a jobs market - so the Project Coordinators and Estimators doing the hiring play games to get the few who they can count on to provide value for their wages. I know of able-bodied, but incompetent workers waiting for months for a call-up, and others, with a well-earned track record, who are dialed in.

Because the majority of the union hall are sitting around waiting for their names to come up in the book - they vote down adding new workers to the waiting-room, and don't authorize new classes of apprentices. In this system, the unions are fighting against their own best self-interests. There are not enough quality workers - so the chaff waits to drift to the surface where they can screw up projects. The only way they can get paychecks is if the bad actors are all that's available.

I think it was Huntsman or Gingrich in tonight's debate who mentioned Steve Jobs talking to Obama about going to China, because there were not 35,000 qualified engineers in the U.S. to do the work. So, maybe there were 15,000 engineers in the U.S. who had to go on unemployment because that's not a big enough workforce for the project. Sometimes the sheer numbers define where the jobs have to go.

The fix for this is having a healthy economy without the outrageous handicaps put up by the EPA and other bureaucracies, allowing new entrepreneurs to start up smaller jobs and using that group of workers. As Ratzenberger points out, there are not enough skilled workers to fulfill the needs of manufacturing - so a self-perpetuating emigration of jobs offshore makes those with skills unable to find jobs at home.
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#11
(11-16-2011, 09:49 PM)John L Wrote: Quick, before you look at this list, Which profession requires the most education, yet pays the least amount of money?

An AI-Jane poster... no need to read the list.

Quote:After having had to deal with this number one biggest group of losers, are you surprised?

S13



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