Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Exteme Hunger Worldwide only Getting Worse.
#1
Perhaps the most important long term tragedy facing the world today is the threat of hunger. There are two major effects: one is immediate; and the other is long term, and even more detrimental to the countries affected.

First, people of all ages will starve to death, and the children are the most vulnerable.

Second, the effects of extreme starvation on children is long term and hinders the country's ability to develop its economy in the long term. Starvation tends to rob the brain of the ability to develop naturally, and young victims never develop the intelligence required be productive as adults. It's a double whammy against the country, and is guaranteed to keep the affected country from having a chance to pull itself out of terrible position.

[Image: 111006-northkorea-food-3p.grid-6x2.jpg]

Spengler has been talking about the problems Egypt faces because it is not able to feed itself. But certainly worse is the case of North Korea: Hunger crisis grips North Korea as food runs short. The world financial crisis is about to cause world wide hunger to accelerate in the coming years, as the 'Haves' can no longer afford to look outward due to their own economic crisis.

Here is a video on what is happening to Egypt, and how the Statist/Colletivist command system is destroying the country: http://geraldcelentechannel.blogspot.com...price.html

Egypt “bankrupt in six months”

Quote:As I’ve been warning all year on this blog and elsewhere, “national bankruptcy” for Egypt is not the same thing as the bankruptcy now under negotiation for its neighbors on the northern coast of the Mediterranean. The largest Arab country imports half its caloric consumption and at least 15 million Egyptians depend on government rations for daily survival. Half of Egyptians. Roughly half of Egyptians live on less than $2 a day, but a small (pita-sized) loaf of subsidized bread sells for less than 1 cent US. There are spot shortages, but Egyptians are not starving–yet. If the country runs out of money, it also runs out of food.

Egypt’s financing requirement annually is somewhere between $15 and $20 billion a year; the Gulf States and the IMF might be good for a third of that. Of course, Egypt could postpone actual starvation, for example, by cutting its military budget massively and diverting funds to food. I suspect that something like that may be happening already.

The cause of all this is straight forward and while not easy to correct, it is doable. This is all due ultimately to Collectivist Statism and the failure to unlock the entrepreneur capabilities of the Individual pursuing his/her own self interest. State central planning works minimally during good times, and is disastrous in times of trouble.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
Reply
#2
Ironically, Egypt used to the be breadbasket of Rome.

Will we soon hear "let them eat cake" from the commanding heights of Egypt?

John, what is the time frame for Egypt running out of grub?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply
#3
Thats sort of hard to quantify. They are not able to provide enough for themselves already. So they rely on several billion dollars per year just to keep things as they are. The article above says they may be bust in six months.

I suspect Egypt and Syria are prime candidates for meltdowns soon. Neither have oil reserves and they are not a bastion of free enterprise.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
Reply
#4
That $6B is not so far from what the US gives Egypt, perhaps. Thus, for a pittance ($6B) the US can exert quite a bit of influence, one would think.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply
#5
The ideal solution would be for them to make nice with the greenhouse of the Middle East. They have centuries of mutual history with Israel - and not all of it is bad. Orson Scott Card wrote about how the Arabs would be well-served to start to view the Jews as long-lost cousins, who more often do the right things and have a legacy of success and prosperity, rather than view them as pariahs who somehow endanger the Arabs own parochial beliefs because their own countries are so poorly run.

How sad it is that the solution to most problems are only unobtainable because of someone's stupid prejudices.
Reply
#6
Mohamed regarded the Jews as long lost cousins, even if his successors did not. But today, that would be a bridge too far for all Muslim dominated countries.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply
#7
Are we hungry and desperate for food or are we all getting too fat? I can never remember...
[Image: 760.png]
Reply
#8
(10-07-2011, 05:56 PM)ghoullio Wrote: Are we hungry and desperate for food or are we all getting too fat? I can never remember...

I just lost 55 pounds. I think I'm both.

Reply
#9
Wonder how many of those starving people could be fed, at least partially, with the food we are converting to ethanol?

Just wondering.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
Reply
#10
That wouldn't do any good,JohnL. We would feed them now, but they would all die later from environmental disasters.

I've lost 70lbs this year by eating bacon and cheese. Moochelle wouldn't approve, but I can tie my shoes now without passing out.
[Image: 760.png]
Reply
#11
We can just loan them e-credit from the FED.
Reply
#12
(10-07-2011, 05:41 PM)jt Wrote: That $6B is not so far from what the US gives Egypt, perhaps. Thus, for a pittance ($6B) the US can exert quite a bit of influence, one would think.

I'm not sure just how much we give them annually, but what we do give them is in credits, for purchases of such things as military hardware, etc. Little actual cash is involved. So much of that would not help buy food stores, I think.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
Reply
#13
I have thought for a long time that with all the money we spend all over the world and on shit hole countries who despise us, we could remove that money and funnel it all into Africa and North Africa and buy ourselves a nice allied continent.
[Image: 760.png]
Reply
#14
For the most part, America has been the breadbasket of the world, and the most likely source of food when famine hits. We have used food aid as often as financial aid - but even that gets converted to secret bank accounts for third world despots. Even non-governmental charities like the Salvation Army, the Red Cross, several UN agencies, and churches worldwide have been circumvented by dictators looting their own people. Unless we have our own boots on the ground distributing food to those who need it, it never seems to get where it belongs.
Reply
#15
John,

We give Egypt and Israel $3 billion annually in cash, not sure about military credits, etc.
Reply
#16
(10-08-2011, 09:42 AM)Palladin Wrote: John,

We give Egypt and Israel $3 billion annually in cash, not sure about military credits, etc.

Cash, or cash credits to buy American things?

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it" - Jonathan Swift, 1710
Reply
#17
We give out aid based upon four considerations:

1. Strategic considerations (Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Afghanistan)
2. Former colonial status (Africa)
3. Political alignment (Middle East)
4. Drug policy (South America)

All of these are based on reciprocal interests and/or historical responsibilities. What these are supposed to do are to encourage drug abatement, fight terrorism, keep oil spigots turned on, and to leave Israel alone. We are disinclined to give aid to countries who vote against us at the UN. If Egypt swings against us, they will lose their aid. The parameters are well known - even to the most fanatic Arab Spring activists, so the developing famine helps to moderate the jihadists somewhat.

Tying aid to US sales of materiel with blanket purchase orders returns much of the aid to us, but most aid is nonrecoverable - even though we go to great lengths to prevent warlords and dictators from scamming it. But even food aid from charitable organizations has been seized by despots and resold on the black market to line their pockets. In the Middle East, we pay some blackmail to neighbors of Israel to discourage attacks and to balance out aid to Israel. This blackmail is often the easiest for them to raid. Yasser Arafat had $1.3 Billion in French bank accounts. See: Thugtatorship.
Reply
#18
And much of that aid lands up in Swiss bank accounts. Is that partially the reason why the US is pressuring the Swiss to have more transparent bank accounts?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply
#19
(10-10-2011, 05:29 PM)jt Wrote: And much of that aid lands up in Swiss bank accounts. Is that partially the reason why the US is pressuring the Swiss to have more transparent bank accounts?

I'm sure it is. The first part of Bush 43 original WAT was stopping the funding of terrorists. It was reported that bin Laden was stripped of his family fortune, and he had to make do by skimming off the charities sending in money. Several competing intelligence agencies have digital hackers who have taken down many of the bank accounts of the bad guys. I've heard that Swiss banks as well as Cayman Island accounts have been raided.

This is probably more important in the WAT than military actions.
Reply
#20
I already said in another thread, Egyptians are 80 million and their only arable land is a strip of half mile along a river.
No surprise that they have a food problem coming.
Somalia and Erythrea, were famine is almost a tradition is just their southern neighbor.

Overpopulation is increasing proble. So far food production and food aid could catch up with irresponsable breeding in areas where almost nothing grows. But when global food production (or our ability to distribute it) will start to be insufficient, at some pivotal point, be ready for a hecatomb.

The humanity lifeline is going to be streched tight. One disruption in global food transportation and it will take cataclysmic proportions.

In the 80's it was tought that the end of the world would come with a global nuclear war. With such demographic timebomb we won't need it I'm afraid.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)