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#21
John L Wrote:I would think that the tape is longer. And 75 yards(metres)? Hell, at that distance they should have been able to hit him with a rock. What amateurs!

meters, yes.

i thought 75 meters was a little close, but that was the estimation of the soldier shot by them as he was immediately able to tell the direction of the shot. they were at his 12 in a silver van padded with mattresses to silence the shot form the rifle.

mobile sniping nest. sounds familiar...S5
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#22
Quote:Hell, at that distance they should have been able to hit him with a rock. What amateurs!
They are amateurs, John. That's the whole point. Many of the insurgents did have some form of training in the former Iraqi army - however, the level of training an Iraqi conscript received was nothing approaching Western standards. And they did hit him - the SAPI plates saved his life. A 7.62 round in the chest from that distance would have been fatal, otherwise.

I want to stress again what some seem to take for granted - this is the first conflict in our history where virtually every soldier is equipped with body armor that will stop the primary threat round (7.62 or smaller). The Interceptor vests and SAPI plates have saved a lot of lives.

I see you caught the misspelling, Ghoullio...yup, the SPC who wrote the article couldn't even get the weapon designation correct - its a Draganov not a Dragonoff.

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#23
Only 75 meters eh?

They suck. I shoot better then they do, without a scope, at a stationary deer, at about the same distance (or a little more), and using a 70 dollar rifle on top of that for Christ's sakes. And I GOT THE DEER BTW. They had a rifle meant for sniping for crying out loud! If a few hayseed's have better accuracy skills, then these guys really are amateurs.

At any rate, I for one, have never heard of these mobile sniping nests before. Can someone explain it better? Jedburgh mabye?
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#24
Not only did he make that mistake, but at the bottom below the PFC's picture, he states that he is from the 101st "Sabre" Cavalry Division. Never heard of a 101 Cavalry Division. I know of the 101st AirMoble(formerly Airborne). Now, there IS a 1st Cavalry Division. Perhaps he meant that also.

I suspect that the writer is a desk puke, and never gets out on to the 'dance floor'.
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All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#25
Gunnen4U Wrote:At any rate, I for one, have never heard of these mobile sniping nests before.

We are talking about an urban insurgency. With that you use what is at your disposal. A van is a nice moble sniper's nest. In SE Asia, we spent all of our time in jungles, heavy forests, and rice paddys, so a van could not be used.

Unfortunately, they did not bother to put in some sheet steel on the inside wall where they would naturally be in 'concealment'. Had they done so, they would have been under 'cover', and probably wouldn't have taken the pounding that they did.

For you non-military types there is a big difference between concealment and cover.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#26
Quote:...he states that he is from the 101st "Sabre" Cavalry Division. Never heard of a 101 Cavalry Division. I know of the 101st AirMoble(formerly Airborne). Now, there IS a 1st Cavalry Division. Perhaps he meant that also.
Its actually the 101st Cavalry Regiment, which is part of the 42nd Infantry Division (National Guard) with which the Army has seen fit to play mix-and-match with the brigade combat teams of the 3rd Infantry Division for the current operational rotation in Iraq. The 3/156 Inf Bn of the 256th Brigade Combat Team that the article states his troop is attached to is a Louisiana National Guard unit that itself is attached to the 3rd ID.

Interesting operational experiment - and it seems to be working.
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#27
anyone care to guess what our casualty rate from Snipers have been?

all I'm Saying, is that if i had to defend my home in an urban setting, you damn betcha id be a Sniper. worked for the Russians in Stalingrad.
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#28
ghoullio Wrote:anyone care to guess what our casualty rate from Snipers have been?

all I'm Saying, is that if i had to defend my home in an urban setting, you damn betcha id be a Sniper. worked for the Russians in Stalingrad.

Just sit 100 yards away and blow shyt up viz remote; that seems to be the prefered motus operendii.
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#29
Quote:...anyone care to guess what our casualty rate from Snipers have been?
There have been less than 30 US troops KIA by sniper fire since the beginning of the conflict, with a slight increase in their effectiveness this year.

The number 1 cause of US deaths by hostile action is still small arms fire (non-sniper), with nearly 500 KIA since the beginning of the conflict, number 2 is IED, with over 400 KIA, and number 3 is VBIED (non-suicide) with nearly 100 KIA by that means.
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#30
Jedburgh Wrote:
Quote:...anyone care to guess what our casualty rate from Snipers have been?
There have been less than 30 US troops KIA by sniper fire since the beginning of the conflict, with a slight increase in their effectiveness this year.

The number 1 cause of US deaths by hostile action is still small arms fire (non-sniper), with nearly 500 KIA since the beginning of the conflict, number 2 is IED, with over 400 KIA, and number 3 is VBIED (non-suicide) with nearly 100 KIA by that means.

30 isnt bad...

is there any indication that these are all in a contained area, or is it spread evenly through the country?

what is VBIED?
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#31
VBIED=Vehicle Borne IED. Those military guys are constantly using abbreviations to "intercourse" with the civilian mind. And they dearly love it.

It reminds me of the Austin Powers move I watched last night on TBS. At one point, Austin asks his dad to use real English speak, in order to confuse the listeners. They start off with some of the most arcaine words that any American would find impossible to follow, if there weren't captions underneath.

Same thing with the military. You are not supposed to know what all the stuff is all about. You are only supposed to scratch your head and say Wha'?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#32
my father in law is a big Govt Geek, and he abbreviates EVERYTHING! our kids are all known by 4 and 3 letter abbreviations. one is SWBA and the other is KCA. he insistently refers to Christmas as "X-Mas" and says it like that.

its something about those pencil pushing minds. like those think tanks who get drunk and come up with names for Military Operations after a night of strippers and coke.
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#33
I hate Austin Powers.

At any rate -- If the military used standard American English, they would give away the plans, therefore, they use that complicated stuff. Explains it I guess?
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#34
Gunnen4u Wrote:I hate Austin Powers.

At any rate -- If the military used standard American English, they would give away the plans, therefore, they use that complicated stuff. Explains it I guess?

I don't blame you one bit. That was the first one I saw, although I would have like to have been able to watch Elizabeth Hurley instead of the quite little zebra in the second movie. They are stupid movies trying to take off on Laugh-In, even having Artie Johnson as GoldMember.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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#35
John L Wrote:I don't blame you one bit. That was the first one I saw, although I would have like to have been able to watch Elizabeth Hurley instead of the quite little zebra in the second movie. They are stupid movies trying to take off on Laugh-In, even having Artie Johnson as GoldMember.

Agreed. Bond was better, so were the women in them.

At any rate, is my theory on why the military uses such terms substantiated somewhat?
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#36
Tait, no bondgirl, or other lady in a movie, can beat Claudia Cardinale in c'era una volta il West, IMO.

Your theory sounds reasonable, the military just makes sure that only people who are familiar with the whole thing, discuss the issues. I guess the abbreviations make it easier to communicate and it gets addicting after a while, but I'm also guessing here.
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#37
SNK Wrote:Tait, no bondgirl, or other lady in a movie, can beat Claudia Cardinale in c'era una volta il West, IMO.

Your theory sounds reasonable, the military just makes sure that only people who are familiar with the whole thing, discuss the issues. I guess the abbreviations make it easier to communicate and it gets addicting after a while, but I'm also guessing here.

I have never seen that movie with the French name, soooo....

Anyhow, we are waiting for some of our vets here to comment on that. :lol:
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#38
Gunnen4u Wrote:I have never seen that movie with the French name, soooo....
The movie is also known as "Once Upon a Time in the West", that one is probably more familiar.
Quote:Anyhow, we are waiting for some of our vets here to comment on that. :lol:

Yea, by the way, I usually use http://www.militarywords.com when I see a military abbreviation, they got loads of them.
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#39
Oh, I have that around here somewhere, I'll have to pop it in sometime. S2
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#40
i guess the PFC sent in a letter to the Armory where his plate was made and sent a few pics back with it.

the first is his chest plate, and then his war wound...
Chest Plate

War Wound

the following is his letter to Point Blank:
Quote: From: Steve Tschiderer [edited]
Date: July 3, 2005 3:31:23 PM EDT
Subject: Thank you for saving my life

Dear Point Blank,

First let me say thank you for saving my life!! I am forever grateful!!!!
My name is PFC Stephen Tschiderer, and I am currently deployed to Bagdhad,
Iraq. Yesterday July 2 2005, I was on patrol and while proving security
around my Humvee, I was shot by a sniper. This sniper was useing a
Draganov sniper rifle with AP rounds. The round struck me at an angle and
did not come through the SAPI plate. enclosed are some pics of the plate
and what the round did to me, which thanks to you guys is only a small
mark. My family and everyone that knows me sends our thanks and keep up the
GREAT work.

THANK YOU AGAIN!!!
PFC Stephen "Doc" Tschiderer
E Troop 101 CAV 256BCT
Bagdhad, Iraq
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