Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bering Strait Tunnel Soon!
#1
It looks like Russia has finally decided to spend the money and connect Russia to North America. Well, good for them. A trans-Bearing Strait Tunnel would be great for commerce.

[Image: russia_highway.png]
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
Reply
#2
I have no doubt that it is doable,

but is it needed?

I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
Reply
#3
Cool!

Why can't we afford to help out? Oh wait
Reply
#4
Symbolic, grandiose, but I don't see how this would be economical... and doubt that Russia would invest in this. Solicit international investment -- this is possible.

And, not even talking about the tunnel itself -- merely connect the railroad net to the tunnel site will take a few decades, we'll be on Mars faster.
Sanders 2020

Reply
#5
What's the point economicaly to link Yakustk and... a city I see named... None (did I read well?)

Linking two nowhere places. Sounds like Sarah Palin's bridge to nowhere. But wait, she's from that place. Maby she wanted to build a bridge to Russia too...
Reply
#6
Perhaps Russia needs illegal immigrants. That would make it economically feasible. The US could help the flow.

From what I understand Ru has only the most rudimentary cross country rail service. Thus, the economic value is unclear. How would they get stuff from Alaska to Moscow, or vice versa?

Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply
#7
(08-24-2011, 05:02 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: What's the point economicaly to link Yakustk and... a city I see named... None (did I read well?)

That's Nome you ninny.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
Reply
#8
(08-24-2011, 05:05 PM)jt Wrote: Perhaps Russia needs illegal immigrants. That would make it economically feasible. The US could help the flow.
They can get illegals in any amounts from China and Central Asia. No need to import the Eskimos.

Quote:From what I understand Ru has only the most rudimentary cross country rail service. Thus, the economic value is unclear. How would they get stuff from Alaska to Moscow, or vice versa?

They cannot, really.

The road, Baikal Amur Mainline, [Image: 250px-Map_Trans-Siberian_railway.png], was built at a huge cost during the Soviet times and does not come anywhere close to the proposed tunnel.

One way to use the tunnel would be to build a sea port new the tunnel exit in Siberia, and connect by ships to Vladivostok.... but then, why do you need the tunnel at all?

The idea makes no sense other than attract investment from people who would no longer buy Florida underwater estates. S6

Sanders 2020

Reply
#9
JohnL, I made a pun with "None" because there is none who live in this area, or almost.

The Chunnel which link France to England took 10 years and two financial restructurations to become profitable, and it lies in one of the busiest traffic spot of the world.

But who live near the Berring Strait? There is no major cities, and as mv pointed out, not even a practicable road network. The existing traffic is practicaly null.

The biggest challenge technologicaly will be how to build a tunel between two moving tectonic plates. I don't know if it has been done already. (The Chunnel was build on the same plate). It means that the tunel will have to adjust with ground movements of 5 to 10 mm a year, enough to make cracks in the strongest concretes. And earthquakes.

The next challenge will be to build a railroad upthere. They talk of a speed train. Ok, but who will take a train from Yakustk to Anchorage or Vancouvert, seriousely? Polar bears?
Reply
#10
Have we forgotten the magnitude 9.2 earthquake that struck Alaska in 1964? Bad place to be during an earthquake--in a tunnel 64 miles long under the ocean. Russia might be "sinking" a lot of ruples into the project.
Reply
#11
I don't think it makes sens to build this tunel when you first need to build 4000 km (2500 mi) in Russia and 2000 km (1250 mi) in Alaska. How much will this cost and how many tons of building material will be needed?
They first have to be sure that the frieght transport will be bigger than the material needed to build the railroads! LOL!

At the present state it's realy a tunel from nowhere to nowhere.

Stalin put thousands of gulag prisoners to build a railtrack across Siberia. All his engineers told them it was folly because build on the permfrost it will be unstable.
Gulag workers had to build it with 18th century technology. they didn't even have a crane. The climatic conditions were terrible. Many died.
When Stalin came to inaugurate the line a locomotive went to the end of the track and never came back. A bridge crumbled behind and the locomotive is still there today.
Reply
#12
Nice history Fredle... .

I knew an old Polish guy who was on work crews in Siberia. He was a tough nut and survived, ultimately immigrating to the US. It was fun to argue with him since he would end up defending what he originally attacked.

Now we know why the "bridge to nowhere" had to be built: To connect to the tunnel to nowhere.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)