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Aircraft-carrier-sized Asteroid on the Horizon
#61
More about mission Rosetta[Image: rosetta3.jpg]
The first probe to land on a comet...
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#62
Well, they were not very big, but this week already we have had two asteroids pass by us, and both were inside the lunar orbit: Back-to-back asteroids harmlessly fly past Earth
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#63
Today a "city block" is flying by us. Not as closely as the "aircraft carrier", yet enough for the astronomers to keep their eyes on their lens.
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#64
What is frightening is that there are so many of these monsters that we don't find until right as they come up on us. Eventually one is going to Impact on the planet and very bad things will happen. And all before we have a chance to respond effectively.

Suddenly it becomes quite apparent that all those strange events throughout history/prehistory were almost certainly the result of Impactors.
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#65
Just in case everyone has been comfortable of late there is this little tidbit of Impactor interest: Asteroid Flies by Earth Thursday: How to Watch Online. Keep in mind that this bad little boy wasn't discovered until August 26th of this year. Just think of all the other ones out there just buzzing around the inner solar system.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pla...OH5Of9E4#!

Fortunately, its already passed us at a fairly safe distance. But it will definitely be back around again soon. As reported by Wired.

Quote:An enormous chunk of space rock will be whizzing past the Earth tonight and you can watch it live during a Slooh Space Camera show, starting at 4 p.m. Pacific/7 p.m. Eastern.

The close-flying asteroid is known as 2012 QG42 and was discovered only a couple weeks ago, on Aug. 26. It is estimated to be between 625 and 1,500 feet in diameter, roughly comparable in size to the Eiffel Tower, and will flash past the Earth at 25,000 mph.

QG42 will be coming in rather near to our home planet — at its closest approach it will be 1.7 million miles away or about seven times the distant between the Earth and moon. Because it was discovered so recently, the asteroid is classified as “potentially hazardous,” meaning that it poses no risk of hitting the planet right now, but that its orbit could cross Earth’s in the distant future. Both NASA and private groups have been working hard over the last decade to catalog all potentially dangerous asteroids, though clearly a few remain undetected.

In addition to a live view of the asteroid, the show will include Slooh’s president Patrick Paolucci and Astronomy magazine columnist Bob Berman, as well as other guests.

Just remember this. Had this little fellow actually impacted the planet, you can bet that more than your weekend would have been ruined as a result. S5
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#66
Just think, human skeletons will be buried beneath a thin layer of iridium one of these days. Many of them will be found with and ipod or ipad next to their skulls. Our layer will also be characterized by mobile phones and tablet computers. Not much pottery though.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#67
(09-17-2012, 06:04 PM)jt Wrote: Just think, human skeletons will be buried beneath a thin layer of iridium one of these days. Many of them will be found with and ipod or ipad next to their skulls. Our layer will also be characterized by mobile phones and tablet computers. Not much pottery though.

Which reminds me,

[Image: $T2eC16JHJGQE9noMZMipBQCf)Y1D6Q~~60_12.JPG]
For his anger is but for a moment, and his favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may tarry for the night, but joy comes with the morning. - Psalm 30:5

This is one of those under-rated master works, well worth buying and reading. And yes, it does have religious, but not in-your-face tones.
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#68
Asteroide_2012_QG42.png
[Image: Asteroide_2012_QG42.png]

[Image: 6a00d8341c73dd53ef017d3bfbcf51970c-pi]

[Image: 600]
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#69
No shock wave show in the last photo. Probably a pile of burning leaves falling from the sky. In addition, Bruce Willis is not on deck.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#70
I believe that is a scene from "Deep Impact", if I recall correctly.
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#71
(09-21-2012, 05:53 PM)John L Wrote: I believe that is a scene from "Deep Impact", if I recall correctly.
I didn't see this movie but this scene is quiete amazing:
Because a rock falls from the sky, all the cars on the highway are moved suddenly in chaotic positions. Extreme magnetic wave?

Then poeple have time to get out of their car and watch a ball of fire slowly crossing the sky...

The reality is that if a rock of this size hit earth at 17,000 mph we will not have the time to see anything, perhaps a loud bang before a gigantic earthquake.

Today we are being visited by half a soccer field.

[Image: asteroid-2012da14-flyby-130206b-02.jpg?1360192957]

[Image: asteroid+da14.jpg]
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#72
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#73
Yes, that was a scene from Deep Impact. In that movie, the smaller portion of the asteroid that survived the nuclear intercept struck in the ocean off the Atlantic coast of the USA. The man and the woman in the foreground are the parents of the girl who the hero gets to safety on his motorcycle, if I remember right. A few scenes later, a great tsunami wipes out everyone who has not gotten high enough up the mountainside beside the highway. The tsunami reaches all the way to the Appalachians.
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#74
(02-12-2013, 12:49 AM)Ron Lambert Wrote: Yes, that was a scene from Deep Impact. In that movie, the smaller portion of the asteroid that survived the nuclear intercept struck in the ocean off the Atlantic coast of the USA. The man and the woman in the foreground are the parents of the girl who the hero gets to safety on his motorcycle, if I remember right. A few scenes later, a great tsunami wipes out everyone who has not gotten high enough up the mountainside beside the highway. The tsunami reaches all the way to the Appalachians.

That was the one part of the the movie that stretched the imagination to the limit. There is physically a limit to the height of any tsunami and how far one that size can travel, due to friction of the surface area.
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#75
You didn't watch "2012"... Tsunami reached the Mount Everest there! But it was not caused by a meteor.
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#76
(02-12-2013, 03:15 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: You didn't watch "2012"... Tsunami reached the Mount Everest there! But it was not caused by a meteor.

No, I did not bother watching 2012. As I have stated before, fantasy is not my thing. I love SciFi, but that was nowhere resembling SciFi. It was pure fantasy.
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#77
I disliked 2012 for a number of reasons. One of them was that the world was supposedly destroyed by water, and God promised after the Flood of Genesis that He would never again destroy the world with water. So it was a direct contradiction of what God promised.
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#78
(09-17-2012, 07:46 PM)John L Wrote: [Image: $T2eC16JHJGQE9noMZMipBQCf)Y1D6Q~~60_12.JPG]
For his anger is but for a moment, and his favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may tarry for the night, but joy comes with the morning. - Psalm 30:5

How about that--an overtly religious, Biblical theme! There is even a Cross in the foreground! Writers and editors back then were not so afraid of Biblical allusions. Then, it was considered artistic. You see how fashions of thought change over the generations.
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#79
JL Wrote:No, I did not bother watching 2012. As I have stated before, fantasy is not my thing. I love SciFi, but that was nowhere resembling SciFi. It was pure fantasy.
I understand. This was pure fantasy and I agree.
But other SciFi stuffs are still half fantasy.
I'm yet to see a SciFi story that meet my definition of rational and plausible - let all consistency.

For example why soldiers traveling at the speed of light still have to use powder guns?
In every case, in SciFi it's never a problem for the heroes to travel at or above the speed of light, if not instantly, across the galaxy, but get 20 century problems... as soon as they land on a planet.

Ron Wrote:disliked 2012 for a number of reasons. One of them was that the world was supposedly destroyed by water, and God promised after the Flood of Genesis that He would never again destroy the world with water. So it was a direct contradiction of what God promised.
Yes, that's why with John, we agree this movie lacks realism. S5
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#80
(02-13-2013, 02:36 PM)Fredledingue Wrote:
JL Wrote:No, I did not bother watching 2012. As I have stated before, fantasy is not my thing. I love SciFi, but that was nowhere resembling SciFi. It was pure fantasy.
I understand. This was pure fantasy and I agree.
But other SciFi stuffs are still half fantasy.
I'm yet to see a SciFi story that meet my definition of rational and plausible - let all consistency.

Then obviously you don't read hard science fiction. And obviously you never bothered reading "The Mote In G-d's Eye", right? Try reading that, and then come back and tell me is not rational and plausible. I'm serious.

Quote:For example why soldiers traveling at the speed of light still have to use powder guns?
In every case, in SciFi it's never a problem for the heroes to travel at or above the speed of light, if not instantly, across the galaxy, but get 20 century problems... as soon as they land on a planet.

You are going about all this wrong Fred.

First, I suspect you are referring to "Projectile Weapons" rather than "powder guns". Gunpowder is just another form of chemical propellant, which pushes the projectile out of a barrel and striking a target.

Projectile weapons have been around for thousands of years now, and they can be so efficient that I see no reason for them to disappear in the foreseeable future. Get used to it Fred, because they are the most practical, and will not be replaced by lasers, or plasma, even when those become usable. Projectile weapons are cheap, efficient, and proven.

Second, there is a question as to whether or not FTL(faster than light) is possible. I happen to not be a follower of FTL, and think wormholes are going to be the eventual answer, it there ever is one. But FTL is used to move the storyline, and not the main concept.

But again, go out and get "The Mote In G-d's Eye", read it and then tell me how Science Fiction lacks all the things above you mention. S5
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