Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Aircraft-carrier-sized Asteroid on the Horizon
#41
I'd risk it. Doesn't have to be a nuke, anything that will hit it and either blow it to bits or knock it out of it's trajectory toward us.

Since it's not an act of war, how do the Geneva Conventions apply?
[Image: PancakeBunny.jpg] I have no idea what you're talking about so here's a bunny with a pancake on it's head
Reply
#42
Of course, the best thing to do is change its trajectory and move it into geosynchronous orbit. That way it can be used as a counterweight for the first space elevator, when it is finally built.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#43
Arthur C. Clarke and his beanstalk aside, John L, do you really think we have the engineering expertise for doing either of those things?
Reply
#44
(03-09-2012, 06:10 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: Arthur C. Clarke and his beanstalk aside, John L, do you really think we have the engineering expertise for doing either of those things?

Moving a large object into orbit, yes. Building a space elevator at this time, no. We haven't learned how to mass produce carbon nanotubes....................yet.

The only problem is that it is much cheaper to deflect it out, or destroy it, OR let it come crashing in. If we can calculate the necessary parameters for using the gravity field to sling objects to within a hairs breath of the goal some millions of miles away, or if we can figure out how to get an Apollo craft to enter the moons gravity and obtain a stable orbit, then we can do it with an asteroid.

All it would take would be for one or more humans to get there, and direct the craft to point its nozzles in the, and start applying the prescribed amount of thrust. And if they are off, they can keep adjusting until they reach the point where the asteroid will meet the planet at just the right time, and angle, and reach a stable orbit.

Then the asteroid can be slowly moved into geostationary orbit and at the exact spot. But again, its all about cost, and danger to the planet if someone is wrong.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#45
If the structure of the asteroid is misjudged, and it breaks apart while rockets are trying to steer it, and the larger pieces inflict catastrophic damage in several locations on earth, then NASA and the US government would be sued. There are risks involved. We need to decide if they are worth running.
Reply
#46
I've been playing Mass Effect 3 all week and I've been wondering if creating a small man-made singularity would ever be possible. If so, our issues with asteroids and free wheeling comets would be taken care of.
[Image: 760.png]
Reply
#47
(03-10-2012, 09:02 AM)Ron Lambert Wrote: If the structure of the asteroid is misjudged, and it breaks apart while rockets are trying to steer it, and the larger pieces inflict catastrophic damage in several locations on earth, then NASA and the US government would be sued. There are risks involved. We need to decide if they are worth running.

Ron, what are the odds of an asteroid being broken up by a tiny rocket motor, or perhaps a couple of them, when that same asteroid has not come apart while whizzing by other objects of high gravity, such as planet earth? One in ten? One in twenty? one in..................?

And are the odds worth that?

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#48
Many of them have been broken up. Many times. Furthermore, some asteroids have subsurface deposits of water ice and other volatiles, which frequently boil off producing steam jets, as the asteroids near the sun. These boiling off volatiles are what give comets their tails. A tiny little rocket engine, if it is big enough to move an asteroid, could be mistakenly placed at some crucial weak spot where just a little extra nudge could allow a steam explosion to shatter the asteroid.
Reply
#49
Ron, there is a difference between a comet and an asteroid. You are mixing the two. Granted an asteroid is part of an old comet, but asteroids do not vent water vapor and produce a tail.

This is akin to arguing how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#50
We're all doomed, you hear! DOOOOMED!

Now, John, what's this you say about an "asteroid landing"?
"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein
Reply
#51
(03-09-2012, 05:57 PM)John L Wrote: Of course, the best thing to do is change its trajectory and move it into geosynchronous orbit. That way it can be used as a counterweight for the first space elevator, when it is finally built.

For some reason I think there will be a conflict in science when the first profitable space elevator goes into operation. Anti-gravity or something else.

Crude steamship passes most advanced sailship type of thing...

Why didn't they retire one of the shuttles in orbit to act as a future tether conterweight...S4

May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand.
Reply
#52
(03-10-2012, 05:17 PM)veritas Wrote:
(03-09-2012, 05:57 PM)John L Wrote: Of course, the best thing to do is change its trajectory and move it into geosynchronous orbit. That way it can be used as a counterweight for the first space elevator, when it is finally built.

For some reason I think there will be a conflict in science when the first profitable space elevator goes into operation. Anti-gravity or something else.

Crude steamship passes most advanced sailship type of thing...

Why didn't they retire one of the shuttles in orbit to act as a future tether conterweight...S4

You would need several thousand shuttles to make enough mass. That's why.

[Image: lossy-page1-260px-Space_elevator_structu...tc.TIF.jpg]

The only thing stopping the space elevator is a mass produced substance that is very light, and unbelievably strong. In other words carbon nano-tubes. We can produce them, but not in huge quantities............yet. Once that is possible, the sky.............or better yet Space is the limit.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#53
Joan, in cqse of dqnger of course we would risk it. Especialy if we have nothing to lose. My point was that it has never been tested.

JL Wrote:Of course, the best thing to do is change its trajectory and move it into geosynchronous orbit. That way it can be used as a counterweight for the first space elevator, when it is finally built.
That would be awsome.
But very difficult to achieve as nobody has hijacked an asteroid yet.
Blowing it into piece or nuking it off his trajectory is one thing. To control its speed, altitude and align it to geosychrone orbit with precision is another thing.
I don't think that all the money on Earth could achive that.

Now imagine we do it, but capitalist corp, out of greed, use it excessively and by pulling too much on the thread cause it to fall on Earth? S6

IMO the counterweight issue is more important than the cable. You would need like 200 IIS'es to support both the weight of the ultra light but extremely long cable and the freight.
Reply
#54
(03-10-2012, 03:14 PM)John L Wrote: Ron, there is a difference between a comet and an asteroid. You are mixing the two. Granted an asteroid is part of an old comet, but asteroids do not vent water vapor and produce a tail.

This is akin to arguing how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.
How sure are you that there are no pockets of water ice embedded deep inside the asteroid, that could still vent explosively if the surface of the asteroid were cracked? If, as you said, asteroids came from comets, there could be water ice all through the asteroid's body. Just the surface water ice has been vented.

How big a pin are you talking about?

Reply
#55
Just send up some cowboy with a special saddle and bridle and have him ride the damn thing home.
[Image: PancakeBunny.jpg] I have no idea what you're talking about so here's a bunny with a pancake on it's head
Reply
#56
Clint Eastwood? (Ref. Space Cowboys)
Reply
#57
(03-12-2012, 12:28 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: Clint Eastwood? (Ref. Space Cowboys)

Ever heard of Slim Pickens Ron? S5

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROVGEKw-5Np3ARLG_smCX...rV99E92A_M]

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Have a Gneiss Day!
Reply
#58
Ron Wrote:How sure are you that there are no pockets of water ice embedded deep inside the asteroid
that's what scientists try to know when an astoroid comes to our vincinity. They end a probe, sometimes crsh one on it to observe the impact, then spend months in nalysing the result of the spectomtry.
And they are still disputing hypothesis, no certainties.
Reply
#59
(03-12-2012, 12:28 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: Clint Eastwood? (Ref. Space Cowboys)

(03-12-2012, 04:16 PM)John L Wrote:
(03-12-2012, 12:28 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: Clint Eastwood? (Ref. Space Cowboys)

Ever heard of Slim Pickens Ron? S5

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROVGEKw-5Np3ARLG_smCX...rV99E92A_M]

YEE HA!
[Image: PancakeBunny.jpg] I have no idea what you're talking about so here's a bunny with a pancake on it's head
Reply
#60
Wasn't that a scene from Dr. Strangelove?
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)