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Learning More About Dinosaurs
#1
It seems that the more we learn about dinosaurs, the less we really know about them over-all. Now, we are learning that they definitely inhabited practically every kind of ecological niche, but time of day as well. The WSJ cites two studies in That's Not a Dinosaur!

And its not that this is some new theory, because it isn't. its just that science is finally tying things together and making it official. Dinosaurs really did rule the planet, in sunlight, and moonlight. Obviously mammals had a rough time being successful.

Impactors can make a whole new ballgame out of things. S5



[Image: RV-AC449_DINO_F_G_20110415233015.jpg]
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#2
Mammals took their revenge: Now you can get a fried chicken for $7.50. S2
[Image: big_76.jpg]
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#3
Fredledingue Wrote:Mammals took their revenge: Now you can get a fried chicken for $7.50. S2
[Image: big_76.jpg]

Can't you just see the fellow, who creates time travel, and goes back with a hunting party. Hunters have always wanted to hunt T Rex. So they go out, bag one, and gather around the camp fire to enjoy nice T Rex steaks, only to find out it tastes just like chicken. S6
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#4
What good would feathers do a velociraptor? How could a dinosaur evolve into a bird if any intermediate stages would have negative survival value and would be killed off by the more efficient competition?
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#5
maybe sexual selection, feathers were considered sexy. or they prepared for judgement day, knowing small size and insulation would come handy in the rough time after the meteor. see, jehova's witnesses also cling to life though we more rationale competition know that god won't save them with his spaceship.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#6
How do mammoths fit into the dinosaur story,are they separated by time a lot?
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#7
Not really... every culture has stories about men fighting dragons, and dinosaur is merely darwinistic slang for a dragon. Wink1
Sodomia delenda est

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#8
the term dinosaur was coined before darwin. by a deeply religious englishman who tried to reconcile the bible, and dinosaurs. he thought all those old bones must have fallen through cracks in the rock. went mad eventually.
no idea why the raptor grew feathers. the purpose isn't always obvious. look at a jellyfish. the thing pedals all day but goes nowhere because it has the drag of a cupboard. took science a long time to figure out that not propulsion is the point of it's movements, but to stir the water and to flush nutrients in.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#9
To me the feathers of the velociraptor have an obvious reason to be: To increase aerodynamism, reduce turbulences as it ran extremely fast, probably faster than the guepard, over 120 km/h. Maybe 150 or 200 km/h or some speed we can't even imagine.
Perhaps it also lift off some weight of the animal during the run.

Sexual selection is not excluded but one prefer to portray dinosaures as basic, violent animals who lived in times of inferior evolution, while garnement and courtoisie is a feature of our more peaceful era.
Maybe dinosaurs were singing at 5'o clock in the morning too?

Palladin Wrote:How do mammoths fit into the dinosaur story,are they separated by time a lot?
Palladin, you seems to know as much about paleontology as does a 5 years old kid.
Yeah: Mammoth => Very big, Dinosaure => Very big, but no, they didn't live at the same time. S5
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#10
Fredledingue Wrote:To me the feathers of the velociraptor have an obvious reason to be: To increase aerodynamism, reduce turbulences as it ran extremely fast, probably faster than the guepard, over 120 km/h. Maybe 150 or 200 km/h or some speed we can't even imagine.
Perhaps it also lift off some weight of the animal during the run.

Sexual selection is not excluded but one prefer to portray dinosaures as basic, violent animals who lived in times of inferior evolution, while garnement and courtoisie is a feature of our more peaceful era.
Maybe dinosaurs were singing at 5'o clock in the morning too?

Palladin Wrote:How do mammoths fit into the dinosaur story,are they separated by time a lot?
Palladin, you seems to know as much about paleontology as does a 5 years old kid.
Yeah: Mammoth => Very big, Dinosaure => Very big, but no, they didn't live at the same time. S5

Fred, you are leaving out The most important positive trait of feathers: dumping heat. Feathers to birds are like huge ears to African elephants. The blood supply goes to the feathers, and the feathers act as a 'heat sink', with the heat radiating outward. On a hot day, you can see birds trying to cool off by raising their wings and allowing more air to pass over the feathers. Our family parakeet used to do this all the time when he got hot.

That is the primary reason for feathers, I am certain. Flight, and hollow bones came later
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#11
Fred,

I know less than anyone,that's why I asked.
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#12
Mammoths lived from around 4.8 million to about 4,500 years ago.
The great dinosaurs died out some 65 million years ago.
So yes they are separated by a great deal of time.

Regarding feathers, as John suggests, their most likely function was thermoregulation.
"Common sense is not so common" - Voltaire
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#13
Tonk,

I asked mainly because I have a geologist friend who spent his years with Exxon looking for oil.

He told me once that some mammoths are found in fair shape and organic material is still in their stomachs and I don't see how????

Seems like they'd be decomposed and gone except bones or fossils??
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#14
Because mammoths lived in the tundra regions there have been discoveries of specimens well preserved by the permafrost, particularly in Russia, the best example is Lyuba, a specimen dated as 40,000 years old.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyuba
"Common sense is not so common" - Voltaire
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#15
Aha,I bet he meant these in Siberia whereas I mistakenly assumed he meant Texas. That ice would preserve them well I guess.
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#16
Yes, these animals have been frozen all that time. Notice that "exceptionaly well preserved" is still far from intact.

There aren't a lot specimens (half a dozen) because when they reach positive temperatures they degrade very quickely, more quickely than an animal dead a few days ago.

There was a great deal with dinosaure fossile featuring non-stone-like material, inside the fossilized bone. But that doesn't mean it's original tissue. Just a fossile material that's not hard.

Feathers:
I think that bird use their wings to ventilate. Not that feathers convoy a lot of heath through blood vessels. They aren't a lot of blood vessels in featers if any.
Developing skin wings (like some lezards) would have been far more effective.
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#17
Fredledingue Wrote:Yes, these animals have been frozen all that time. Notice that "exceptionaly well preserved" is still far from intact.

There aren't a lot specimens (half a dozen) because when they reach positive temperatures they degrade very quickely, more quickely than an animal dead a few days ago.

There was a great deal with dinosaure fossile featuring non-stone-like material, inside the fossilized bone. But that doesn't mean it's original tissue. Just a fossile material that's not hard.

Feathers:
I think that bird use their wings to ventilate. Not that feathers convoy a lot of heath through blood vessels. They aren't a lot of blood vessels in featers if any.
Developing skin wings (like some lezards) would have been far more effective.

A couple of things here Fred.

First, DNA is intact in droves with that baby specimen. As soon as DNA cloning is perfected, you will see a lot of this infant's clones walking around the globe.

Second, about blood and feathers, you would be surprised at the amount of blood that makes it to the base of the feather. If you pluck a prime feather out of a bird, it will bleed there. And with enough feathers, there is enough blood reaching them. I'm serious, go out and pluck a feather from your neighbor's parrot, and see what happens to your hand. S2
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#18
It would be much easier to geneticaly manipulate existing elephants so that they grow furr than re-cloning the mammoth off their remnants.
Poeple at the zoo won't see the difference anyway. S2
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#19
Fredledingue Wrote:It would be much easier to geneticaly manipulate existing elephants so that they grow furr than re-cloning the mammoth off their remnants.
Poeple at the zoo won't see the difference anyway. S2

Fred, the official recognized way to do this, is to inject an elephant's egg with the DNA of the mammoth. When the offspring reaches maturity, another egg is taken from the offspring, and again impregnated with original DNA.

This would go on until the resulting offspring was so overwhelmingly Mammoth, that there would be no difference. That would entail about five generations.

For example, the first generation would be half mammoth, the second generation would be 3/4s mammoth, The third generation would be 7/8s mammoth. The fourth generation would be 14/16s, and the fifth generation would be 28/32s mammoth. This is the most practical approach.

But in the eventual future, I predict that this will become old hat, and true cloning will be possible.
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Hillary Clinton Is Like Herpes, "She Wont Go Away" - Anna Paulina
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#20
The only reason to clone an extinct animal is to demonstrate that we can, that is not a suitable justification to do so.

Mammoths are extinct, let them remain so, ditto other mega fauna.
"Common sense is not so common" - Voltaire
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