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Mammoth!
#1
4 years?.
Sanders 2020

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#2
This is exciting. Just think of the other mega-fauna that could be brought back.
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“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#3
yeah, good idea to bring back a species that evolution did away with in a warming period in this age of unprecetented global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and giving it a headstart by defective genes caused by cloning.
"You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter." Dick Cheney
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#4
John L Wrote:Just think of the other mega-fauna that could be brought back.

Classical liberals, perhaps? Wink1
Sanders 2020

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#5
I wonder if they taste like chicken?

Or, could be a viable substitute for beef?

I see a Burger King Mammoth Burger on the horizon.

S2
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#6
JohnWho Wrote:I wonder if they taste like chicken?

Or, could be a viable substitute for beef?

I see a Burger King Mammoth Burger on the horizon.

S2

Naah, all this 'so called' Global Warming will just kill them off again.
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“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#7
If they create enough of them, I want to go shoot one.
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#8
Gunnen4u Wrote:If they create enough of them, I want to go shoot one.

Peace Loving Socialists, armed with real AK47s are far more exciting.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#9
First of all we are not even remotely ready to rebuild an entire mammoth genome. It's going to be far more difficult than with a mouse lab conserved under optimal conditions.

Secondly even if we do that, artificialy inseminating an elephant is extremely difficult. Far more difficult than with any other mamal.

Not saying that this is impossible but 20 years is more realistic than 4.

And Q is right: We'd better recreating dinosaures as we reconstitue their atmospheric environement (but this is total science fiction).
For a mammoth to survive the warm weather we may have to shave his whool. But then why having a mammoth for if he has no whool on his back? It will make the whole experiment useless.
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#10
No it wouldn't, we'd have a mammoth to look at it or shoot. Good enough for me.

It might offer something fascinating to study maybe. I would rather resurrect early man or something though and see what he was up to, especially for any genetically dictated behavioral patterns or something.
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#11
Fredledingue Wrote:First of all we are not even remotely ready to rebuild an entire mammoth genome. It's going to be far more difficult than with a mouse lab conserved under optimal conditions.

Secondly even if we do that, artificialy inseminating an elephant is extremely difficult. Far more difficult than with any other mamal.

Not saying that this is impossible but 20 years is more realistic than 4.

And Q is right: We'd better recreating dinosaures as we reconstitue their atmospheric environement (but this is total science fiction).
For a mammoth to survive the warm weather we may have to shave his whool. But then why having a mammoth for if he has no whool on his back? It will make the whole experiment useless.

Excuse me, but weren't there many different types of mammoth.

How about the Steppe Mammoth. Not so much hair. There was also an Imperial Mammoth, and it too had little hair. And there was even a Southern Mammoth, again with little hair. And how about the Columbian Mammoth?

Only the Wooly Mammoth, was a northern dweller. And I will bet you that even this species, could tollerate warmer temperatures, when reintroduced. In other words, I doubt this will be a huge stumbling block.
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“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#12
We may be very surprised how intelligent the early men were: They new guns are dangerous (and had to be eventualy banned) so they stuck with flintstone axes. :lol:
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#13
Fredledingue Wrote:We may be very surprised how intelligent the early men were: They new guns are dangerous (and had to be eventualy banned) so they stuck with flintstone axes. :lol:

:|

Lost in translation? Or they went and banned the atl atl to only come up with the M60 Machine gun 30,000 yrs later?
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#14
According to your theory, even more lethal weapons were invented because existed weapons were banned? Interresting.

Lets' poeple kill each other with powder propelled bullets so they don't think about using anti-matter sprays or something.
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#15
Fredledingue Wrote:According to your theory, even more lethal weapons were invented because existed weapons were banned? Interresting.

No, I was trying to figure out what you're saying in your previous statement, you hoplophobic ignoramus.

myself, trying to understand Fred's Engrish Wrote:Lost in translation? Or they went and banned the atl atl to only come up with the M60 Machine gun 30,000 yrs later?

If this is wrong, then tell me what you meant.

Quote:Lets' poeple kill each other with powder propelled bullets so they don't think about using anti-matter sprays or something.

Grow a pair, stick with the topic and quit sucking off media propaganda over there, weakling. :lol:

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JohnL - if they do create a mammoth, what would be the ramifications? I mean socially/politically/to do with money. Surely, like other cell research, creating animals long since extinct would create a minor storm in some circles.
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#16
Gunnen4u Wrote:JohnL - if they do create a mammoth, what would be the ramifications? I mean socially/politically/to do with money. Surely, like other cell research, creating animals long since extinct would create a minor storm in some circles.

Not totally sure Tait. My best guess is that certain investors would have different goals in mind, including the hunting industry later on, once herds were big enough.

My guess is that mastodons, ground sloths, smilodon, another form of muskox, dire wolves, and even NA lions, will be eventually regenerated in the near future. Can you just imagine all this in certain preserves across the country? People would pay good money to visit such places, just to get pictures of them. It would generate a huge industry.

Some will also be released to the wild too. The possibilities are limitless.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#17
don't forget neanderthals and Lucy, to be utilized as thugs and sex slaves. Wink1
Sanders 2020

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#18
well you would also have to consider the ecosystem itself.

if you introduce any new animal to the area where they have no natural predators, they're bound to get completely out of control, even possibly killing off the major animal groups in the area.

and what happens if Dire Wolves and the other animals start hunting humans too?

so I think it would be better if they stuck to only closed off preserves.
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#19
Aurora Moon Wrote:if you introduce any new animal to the area where they have no natural predators,

I vote Gunnen4u for Natural Predator.

Wink1
Sanders 2020

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#20
African Gemsbok was introduced to the Tularosa Basin in New Mexico, encompassing much of Ft. Bliss and White Sands Missile Range, in 1969.

Having no natural predators they faced off with in Africa (such as lions and other animals), the gemsbok (called by it's genus, "Oryx" in the US) flourished and now there are thousands of them, enough to cause problems.

That was why hunting by people was opened up, and I shot one dead. It was a wily critter and I had to work hard for it, but it was worth it.

Man, namely folks like myself, Mr. Yak and Huh_What, are the apex and natural predator to regulate things. We'll figure things out alright if we create these animals, AM - right now the major struggle is with wolves, but eventually, we'll be regulating by hunting too. Revenue from it all would surely pay for such animals easily.

I am sure the same will be done with Mammoths, Woolly Rhinos and stuff too.

I would love to hunt dire wolves myself. I would do it with an AR or some other assault rifle, given that being bum rushed like a enraged wino by 10 wolves is not something you do with a bolt-action.

If they ate a few folks, we needed the thinning out really.
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