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NK
#41
I don't think you can assume anymore that China wants to side with NK. They just want to handle the affairs in their backyard themselves or at least create the impression to the world that they have everything under control.

If you are familiar with Chinese culture you might remember how important appearances are to them. They always want to appear in control.

If China were to resolve this conflict in a way acceptable to SK and the US imagine how that would increase their standing with the world. I would assume they are well aware of this opportunity.
"And down through the centuries the robes have never failed to keep the public at a respectful distance, inspire a decent awe for the professions, and impart an air of solemnity and mystery that has been as good as money in the bank. The four faculties of theology, philosophy, medicine, and law have been the perennial seedbeds, not only of professional wisdom, but of the quackery and venality so generously exposed to public view by Plato, Rabelais, Molière, Swift, Gibbon, A. E. Housman, H. L. Mencken, and others. What took place in the Greco-Roman as in the Christian world was that fatal shift from leadership to management that marks the decline and fall of civilizations." - taken from a speech by Hugh Nibley
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#42
Rumor has it that China is reconsidering its support of NK. Is this really a possibility? Why would they change their policy now?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#43
Why would they? Its a sensible choice in dumping NK. What could they possibly gain from feeding a clearly rabid animal in their own back yard? At the end of the day, treaty with ROK or no, the Korean peninsula is pretty far from our borders. China has much more at stake in making the right choice.
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#44
China has to be ambivalent. What they don't want is for North and South Korea to be unified under the South Korean government, which would lead to American troops being stationed on China's border, or at least next door to China. The last time Chinese troops fought American troops (in the Korean War), the Chinese lost over a million men. Even for them, that was excessive. Thus it is rumored that among the Chinese military leaders there is an addage, "Never get involved in a ground war in Asia against Americans." There are probably many leaders in China who have common sense. But there are also undoubtedly many leaders in China who are paranoid.
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#45
jt Wrote:Rumor has it that China is reconsidering its support of NK. Is this really a possibility? Why would they change their policy now?

Of course they are. That is what I am trying to say. They have nothing to gain from supporting NK. There is no ideological war at stake.

Look at it this way if Mexico had a crazy dictator with nukes and was constantly threatening Guatemala would we want China to come in on behalf of Guatemala? No this is our backyard, our block, our hood. We run things here. If china were to come in and solve the problem we would look weak.

Korea is China's neighborhood let them regulate things.
"And down through the centuries the robes have never failed to keep the public at a respectful distance, inspire a decent awe for the professions, and impart an air of solemnity and mystery that has been as good as money in the bank. The four faculties of theology, philosophy, medicine, and law have been the perennial seedbeds, not only of professional wisdom, but of the quackery and venality so generously exposed to public view by Plato, Rabelais, Molière, Swift, Gibbon, A. E. Housman, H. L. Mencken, and others. What took place in the Greco-Roman as in the Christian world was that fatal shift from leadership to management that marks the decline and fall of civilizations." - taken from a speech by Hugh Nibley
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#46
I think China has much to gain from supporting NK. In doing so, they prevent SK from reaching their border by absorbing NK. They keep the US embroiled in a loosing proposition (negotiating with NK) and illustrate the weakness of the US. They flex their political/military muscles in the region by their intransigence. The risk is the nuclearization or re-militarization of Japan, which is reluctant to do so. Where is the downside for the Chinese?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#47
I agree with jt: NK is China's pitbull on a leash. A dangerous dog, yet better than no dog at all.

IMO China is more embarrassed with the links NK may have with Iran.
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