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What are you Reading?
I finally succumbed to the curiosity of seeing where David Weber got the name of his crime family world of Erewhon. He's always fascinated me by all his inside puns and obvious allusions to real world people in his characters. Hillary and Bill Clinton are examples of celebrities he's skewered by putting them in his books as sleazy, amoral characters with easily recognized aliases: like Guillaume Rodham. (Guillaume being French for William.) His character names in his Safehold novels are often Welsh.

Erewhon was a novel written by Samuel Butler in 1872, about an undiscovered place, reminiscent of all the places in Gulliver's Travel. Similar to the planet in the Harrington Universe, Butler's Erewhon is a place where being ugly or sick is punishable with imprisonment and hard labor, and little things like embezzlement totally okay, and not treated criminally but restoratively. Makes one think of Weber's Erewhon, where crime families rule. I went to The Gutenberg Project to download his works, because I had never heard of them at all. I wonder if Weber did this on purpose?

Butler also used the Weber-used technique of spelling names backwards. Weber's Erewhon is the same as Butler's, Nowhere spelled backwards but the W and H switched. One character in Butler's novel is called Senoj Nosnibor. Maybe it's a British thing, because J.K. Rowling used it also in her Harry Potter books.
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No, not a British thing, reversed names are not so uncommon. One of the Disney productions reversed DISNEY to obtain the character name.

Erewhen is of course famous but still cheating, "WH" should be reversed too!

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my problem with SciFi---I cannot find anything new to read S4

A Sci-Fi writer passed away about a month ago. Granted, I did not read him (he was not all that good, really), but I read his weekly reviews of new sci-fi for years.. and they are no longer coming out S4
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There are new SF authors producing new works, and plenty of established authors writing new ones. Weber, for instance, is prolific, and writes like a whirling-dervish, collaborating with other authors for freshness. One place to easily find good reads is at Baen.com: https://www.baen.com/allbooks/category/i...t&dir=DESC. The Free Library offers a sampling of authors to peruse.
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Just read Near Dark by Brad Thor. Overall, it entertained and was worth the buy. It was not Brad Thor’s best in my opinion. At times, I thought it lost the reader with too much support or background filler, but you were too far invested to put it down. Just enough to keep you engaged to hope that he got the girl or crushed the bad guys. It felt and read commercial like Brad had a timeline to meet and needed to fill that 20 hour mark. Don’t get me wrong, the story was good. It had the hero. It had emotional loss. It had some romance, but was never fulfilled. All in all like most Brad Thor books. I thought it built the story in detail and ended it quickly with a shotgun blast. Brad Thor is a talented writer, but I think he got lazy on this one once he realized the build read too long. Great characters that got built up only to be wasted. The climax of the story could have been better. Some things never made sense to me. Why would one of the best assassins in the world moonlight as a tourist guide in France? Seriously? France sucks. Why target it with the story? Kind of a stupid background. Still love his books. They entertain me. However, this is not his best.
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I just picked up the new Weber book, Into the Light, and realized I missed the precursor, Out of the Dark. The write-ups on this series is off-putting. It is downgraded because of the Vampires, I think. Too many think that tips into fantasy. But upon reflection (spoiler) the vampires are a result of advanced technology that turned Dracula into nanobots in the 1500's. I stopped halfway through the second book in order to read the first one, so this conjecture may be proved wrong. The Hegemony uses 3D printers at the molecular level, which Weber compared in the book as similar to the Star Trek technology that Kirk stole from some advanced world in order to produce instant snacks. The StarTrek replicator is obviously that same 3D printer.
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I can't remember the last Weber book I read, its been a good while.
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All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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I reread the Honorverse novels, as well as the Safehold series that John despises, The Empire of Man series, and the Dahak series.. I enjoy good ctaftsmanship in writing, and Weber delivers there. While John disapproves of  the wierd names in the Safehold series - I look at them as a challenge to see the often underlying basis for them and inside jokes. (Guillaume Rodham still cracks me up.

Quote:It was one thing for a senior officer to invite a junior to share a joke; it was quite another for some kiss-ass young prick who thought he was showing his sophistication to deal himself into a joke he didn't even begin to comprehend.

The citizen major general cut his own chuckle off instantly and gave the citizen lieutenant—rodham, guillermo, the kid's name patch said, he noticed—a sudden, cold glance. The citizen lieutenant immediately stopped laughing, swallowed hard, turned away, and punched the lift button again, as if that could somehow magically conjure the slow-arriving car into existence. He stood absolutely silent, as erect as if someone had inserted a broom handle up his backside, while small beads of perspiration dewed his hairline, and Thornegrave looked away once more, satisfied with the effect.


and
Quote: Citizen Lieutenant Rodham was waiting to play guide again. Thornegrave's initial opinion of the citizen lieutenant had been amply confirmed in the course of the trip from Shilo, and he was amazed and baffled by how someone as unprepossessing as young Guillermo could convince so many different women to sleep with him. The citizen major general still didn't like the citizen lieutenant a bit, but he'd been forced to change his mind about him in at least one regard. He'd figured the smarmy, apple-polishing little bastard to be completely useless, but he'd been wrong. The citizen lieutenant wasn't particularly skilled at his official duties, but he attacked them (when anyone was looking, at any rate) with enormous energy, and he'd displayed a facile wit at borrowing other people's work or at least explaining away his own failures. More to the point, however, he had a quality StateSec occasionally needed badly: amorality.

Weber is full of this kind on insider input. His Safehold series has many instances of writing between the lines. I noticed Merlin and Nimue coming up in his book Into the Light..
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(06-18-2021, 07:58 PM)WmLambert Wrote: [size=medium]I reread the Honorverse novels, as well as the Safehold series that John despises, The Empire of Man series, and the Dahak series..

Did I ever state that I "despised" the series? Why don't you look it up and then copy what I said, ok?
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All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.
H. L. Mencken
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Sorry if I took your posts that you were never going to consider them again because of the naming idiosyncrasies, too far. I also found the multiple names and the stupid spelling ridiculous, but I offset that by looking for the inside story he was creating by doing so. I'm still not sure I've figured it all out fully, but that is one good reason to reread books you like.

Reading the first book after halfway through the second is a good way of seeing more from the first. I know who the vampires are, so picking up on double entendres comes much easier.
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