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What are you Reading?
If you were referring to the county library, this must mean that you don't use an eReader, correct?  You must still use books.  The truth is that I pretty much gave up on real books, because I can obtain almost anything I want on the internet, and they are in epub, mobi, pdf, format.  I have a Huge library that I keep on my computer and have just about anything I wish.  Furthermore, I can change almost any format to epub, which I normally read because my reader is a B&N Nook.  It seems like almost everyone owns a Kindle, and since I's an Individualist, I just had to go against the grain.  S5

You should try an eReader sometime.  Its so easy to use, and you can read it anywhere.  I just got a haircut yesterday, and took my Nook along.  Go to the doctor, or anywhere that I may have to wait?  I carry my Nook with me.  I could even download epubs on to my smart phone, which has a 6"  screen, and read from it too.  Only problem with them is that smartphones have batteries that get run down quickly.  An eReader uses only "e-ink" which uses little power, so my battery keeps holding a charge for days.

Anyway, I just assumed you did this, and when you mentioned library, my first thought was "Which web library", because there are lots of them. I haven't been to the country library for years now.
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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I have a copy of Brad Thor's latest book, Use of Force. I enjoyed it. I obtained it from Amazon. It cost $8.52 (in hardback). That included shipping. I might have waited a few months and gotten it in paperback form for less. But I received this on August 28. Hey Bill, come over and I'll let you have my copy. I've already read it.

Since I still do not have the use of a car of my own, I have not been able to frequent the Public Library as often as I wish. Getting a book by mail cheap through Amazon is a good deal for me.
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I use an eReader all the time. Libraries do allow you to check out electronic copies as well as paper. I usually am so far out in front of waiting for books that the wait is not a real issue. Even at just a few bucks a book, buying as many books as I read would be too costly.

Don't worry, Ron, my order is nearly ready.
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Weird. As we all probably know, Vince Flynn and Brad Thor write in the same genré of espionage adventure, with Mitch Rapp and Scot Horvath playing the President's personal spy/assassin. I think after Vince Flynn died and Kyle Mills took over his series, that the two have written a very similar plot line. Both have Russia starting WWIII by attacking Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania. Rapp. in "Red War" fights against a "Putin" alias to help a failing NATO and an America with no skin in the game. I'm 20 chapters in on Thor's "Spy Master" and Horvath has uncovered the Russian plot to start WWIII by invading Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, while compromising NATO.

Both novels seem to stage this plot line around the mess Obama left the world in. Almost all the problems that allowed Russia to play this role were fixed by Trump.
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John, I know how much you hate the Weber Safehold series because the names are screwy making the action hard to follow. After the last book, where Merlin won the war against the Group of Four, there were numerous spinoff versions of tying the new techie Safehold to the Empire from the Ashes series.

Weber's new book comes out in a week or so, and the cover art shows spaceships flying in war formations. In the Mutineers' Moon plotline, it was a machine, Dahak who discovered the attacking Achuultani were run by a computer and destroyed it, and is similar to Merlin, who is a PICA machine. I wonder if Weber will steal from the one to tweak the other?
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I just started reading the Vicky Peterwald series, by Mike Shepherd.  I never did read them before, so I am starting out by rereading "Daring" of the Kris Longknife series in order to bring things up to date.  "Daring is the first book that introduces her in a serious way.  Once I finish it again, I'll go on to her series.  

I really like hard "Sci Fi", but I love Sci Fi with a sense of humor, and Mike Shepherd is a master at this.
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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I often go to Project Gutenberg to check out the latest literature that becomes available for free. Many books that cross the threshold are relatively new. Today I downloaded the 2016 Blumenthal book "Crimes of the Educators," in which he nails the Progressives for their criminal takeover of education. One of the new ideas he presented that I did not know was how John Dewey was more influenced by Edward Bellamy, a Unitarian journalist, who in 1884 wrote 'Looking Backward' which described a utopian socialist society in 2000 America. Evidently it was more influential than Marx and Engels. I downloaded it and it is truly despicable in heralding a utopia that history has completely disproved. In it, Money is no longer needed or used. Government does everything, and everyone prospers. It sounds like Captain Kirk, in "The Voyage Home" (Star Trek IV - the most popular Star Trek movie.) Kirk doesn't offer to pay for the pizza...

Dr. Gillian Taylor : Don't tell me you don't use money in the 23rd Century. - Kirk : Well, we don't.
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I reread "Stranger in a Strange Land." (Another great read from Project Gutenberg.) The description says it was the original 220,000-word novel that Heinlein first wrote. The publishers wanted it cut down to 150,000 words before they would print it. For the life of me, I cannot remember it being different from the original book I read way back when.
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For some reason, publishers manage to edit down just about everything. I wonder what Dune was like before it got edited?
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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There are some authors, like James Joyce or Samuel R. Delany, who were handled differently. My high school, English teacher, Mr. Killoran, was in the Who's Who as one of the world's foremost experts on James Joyce - which was funny because he told me he had never read Joyce, until after college, and only used Cliff's Notes. He said once that Joyce would present one, long, flowing, non-punctuated, stream of consciousness manuscript that the publisher needed to extensively edit before printing. Delany is the same. His "Dhalgren" is almost unreadable (like Moby Dick), and you need to take it on faith that after 400 pages a plot will eventually appear and the obscure will emerge into understandability.

In Stanger in a Strange Land, The character Juball Harshaw explained that he always allowed in plot and grammatical "errors" because editors needed something to change, before they would accept a manuscript. It was better to give them a chance to fix something unimportant to mess with rather than the stuff he wanted left alone.

My brother, Ron can give you more experience with that because he's been published, and once mentioned the number of rewrites it takes for an editor to accept your work into his acceptance.
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Another work I downloaded from Project Gutenberg was "Misinforming a Nation", a 1917 book by Willard Huntington Wright. He wrote how Great Britain drove much of our intellectual unacceptance: "...in time we will come to realize how deceived we were in accepting England’s insinuations that France is indecent, Germany stupid, Italy decadent, and Russia barbarous. The great harm done by England’s contemptuous critics is in belittling American achievement." To my thinking, we still hold to the same British ideas.
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Thanks to Project Gutenberg,, I've been rereading "Golden Age" science fiction. Robert A. Heinlein, Harry Harison, and E.E. 'Doc" Smith are some I read many years ago, and enjoyed. Now as I reread them, I'm bothered by the obvious lack of intuitive scientific progress. For instance, there is an idea that in the far distant future, all computers are driven by reels of tape. Isaac Asimov was famous for describing computers the size of city blocks, which need scores of interpretive engineers to interpret their output. Some SF writers assume "pocket-sized" computers, but most placed that accomplishment many centuries in the future. In general, good SF is good at prediction, but very much behind the curve of actuality. I'm reading Footfall by Niven and Pournelle, and much of the glamour is washed out of it by time. David Weber still hangs in there as solid hard science SF, with no taint of disappointment.
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(01-02-2020, 09:18 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Now as I reread them, I'm bothered by the obvious lack of intuitive scientific progress.

I agree Bill.  Things are progressing faster than even Moore's Law envisioned.  Things just keep accelerating exponentially.  Will it ever slow down?  Spiteful

Beyond Moore's Law

My only complaint with Moore's Law is that there is far more to scientific advancement than just the increase in transistors.  I wonder what the next forecast will include?

Moore's Law Is Ending... So, What's Next?
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“Socialism always begins with a universal vision for the brotherhood of man and ends with people having to eat their own pets.”
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Totally agree, John. What is funny, is that scientific productivity has slightly slowed, but the spread of scientific criticism and publication has increased. More people opining on stuff they have no clue about.
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Remember the 2016 book: "Crimes of the Educators" by Samuel Blumenthal that I downloaded from Project Gutenberg? I tried to find a link for it, and could no longer find it. I wonder if this is a case of selective hiding of inconvenient works, by Progressive IT people who are enswamped everywhere.

It is available at Amazon.
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