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Woman Hears for the First Time
#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNdV76hIiuM

Amazing Story. Technology has supplied this woman with the gift of hearing, something we all take for granted. Just imagine what technology will be capable of doing within the next 20 to 50 years.
The true purpose of democracy is not to select the best leaders — a clearly debatable obligation — but to facilitate the prompt and peaceful removal of obviously bad ones. 
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#2
Great, now she probably won't shut up like every other woman...
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#3
(10-03-2011, 07:13 PM)ghoullio Wrote: Great, now she probably won't shut up like every other woman...

heh, a lot of deaf people NEVER shut up... so I doubt any of that changed. S5

we're usually a pretty vocal/opinionated lot.

edit: just read some of the comments to the video. honestly, some people just don't understand deaf people at all, if some of them was that ignorant. thankfully there's a good amount of people on there who already explained it to them so that I don't have to.

Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
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#4
(10-03-2011, 08:00 PM)Aurora Moon Wrote:
(10-03-2011, 07:13 PM)ghoullio Wrote: Great, now she probably won't shut up like every other woman...

heh, a lot of deaf people NEVER shut up... so I doubt any of that changed. S5

we're usually a pretty vocal/opinionated lot.

edit: just read some of the comments to the video. honestly, some people just don't understand deaf people at all, if some of them was that ignorant. thankfully there's a good amount of people on there who already explained it to them so that I don't have to.

LOL!, that's cute.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#5
you guys should read some of the comments.. it's hilarious somewhat. there's a few people who honestly believes that all deaf people are supposed to speak like the Hulk or something like that.

Arrgh. Aurora Hungry. Me go Smash up food! Aurora eat now!! Aurora Bye!
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
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#6
You should try talking like that anyway just to mess with people.
S13
Different eyes see different things. Different hearts beat on different strings.
But there are times for you and me when all such things agree.
-Geddy Lee, Rush.
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#7
How effective could that technology be for all deaf folks???
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#8
(10-03-2011, 09:25 PM)Palladin Wrote: How effective could that technology be for all deaf folks???

It depends on what kind of implant the deaf person might get, and if they're healthy enough both physically and mentally to get one.

Most cochlear implants requires some surgery, which can be highly risky for some people... espeically those who are already on medication, like the blood-thinning type. there's also strong issues with Electronic and electrostatic disruptions that can infer with how effective this implant is. it also causes a deaf person's motor control to go haywire sometimes thanks to the electric impulses caused by cochlear implant devices.

oh, and here's the best part... if a device fails for some reason, the deaf person has to go though surgery ALL OVER AGAIN. after surgical re-implantation, the implantee must go through another month of silence between time of surgery and initial stimulation. this can be really tedious and highly frustrating for those who were just getting used to hearing things.

and for those reasons many deaf people won't get one, no matter how many times other people keep on badgering them to get one.

in fact, many deaf people are highly against this sort of thing... feeling that most deaf people who got implants only did it to appease their parents or did it out of peer pressure from hearing people who simply didn't understand that many were happy or content the way they were.

I can kind of understand that logic, as seeing I do see a lot of hearing people ask about cochlear implants a lot and why most deaf people should have one. it does get annoying after a while.

but on the other hand, if a deaf person genuinely wants to have one, and she/he is doing it for himself/herself and nobody else, I say let her have one.
that woman up above were very clearly happy with the results, despite the disadvantages. S1

http://www.auditoryverbaltraining.com/ha-ci.htm the pros and cons of such implants, in case you're interested. S1
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
relax. it's only the internet!
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#9
Implants aren't the only way to go. Several decades ago I studied cases of bone-induction for hearing. There were already in use speakerless bean-bag snakelike things one could sling over the neck and wear like a lei. It broadcast sounds that the body picked up and sent to the brain, without using the ears. At the same time, there was a matching story about vision that didn't use the eyes.

The brain receives an electrical signal from its sensory organs to produce the sight and sound that we comprehend. It was noted that breaking the code of how this signal works would make it a simple process of sending the signal straight to the brain to produce the same imaging and hearing as normal. At that time, using very simplistic coding, we could produce an image made up of a limited number of pixels, something like a 90's football stadium scoreboard, for a person who had no sight organs. These images and sounds were introduced into the body by bone-induction. Perhaps implants do this same job easier.

It seems like a simple leap of progress from breaking the code to making it work.

As a matter of fact, I wouldn't mind having enhanced senses - even though I can hear and see okay. Ultra-violet and infra-red vision would be beneficial at times. as would higher and lower ranges of hearing. Maybe earthquakes wouldn't sneak up on us.

At the same time, this same entry to the brain via electric signals of the proper coding would be like telepathy, and thoughts could be transferred. There is an instrument called the field cardiogram or field encephaloscope, I believe, that is used on the battlefield to find wounded soldiers for triage. This can pick up brain waves without connection. Given the proper encoding, what prevents broadcasting thoughts?
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#10
yeah, I heard about that.... it's a certainly fascinating subject for sure. Having telepathy would rock, but I can see the downside to it if you weren't able to control the broadcasting at will.

another negative side effect is that people might get a little paranoid about you reading their thoughts even if your implants didn't work like that, it only worked with other people who had the same implant.. or whatever. it might have an negative impact on your social life.

however I can see another use for this... imagine a dream machine, that can record your dreams thanks to this technology! you have no idea how much I've always wanted a dream recording machine for ages. I'm always having those wild and wacky dreams, and they're often kickass. however, it's hard to talk about them in conversations since how it can be boring for the other people because they weren't THERE to see it and stuff. but with the dream recorder, they could actually SEE for themselves.
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
relax. it's only the internet!
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#11
There is no reason such a device should be uncontrollable. Your phone can talk to most everyone, but you can select to whom and what you wish to speak without any fear. That's one nice thing about nascent technology - it only gets better and solves problems as they arise.

I think each person's inner "coding of their brain activity into thought" would be different, and a selective interface would be necessary anyway. I doubt universal broadcasting or unwanted reception would be the order of the day.

Perhaps the next step will be installation of chips to give us abilities only available to idiot-savants. Doing tensor math in your head, or mastering the piano instantly...too cool to be appreciated properly.
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#12
yeah. then the whole anime TV series "Ghost in the shell" would become reality. S1 of course that does bring up the issue of hackers and the like... which was a strong issue that often popped up in the TV show.

Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
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#13
I recall some science fiction stories about people who record their dreams and then sell them. Probably just a more direct way of doing it than fiction writers employ now by writing their stories.
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#14
Anyone ever see the movie "City of Lost Children" by Terry Gilliam about the scientist who captures children to harvest their dreams?
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#15
That brings up the question: what do you do with those dreams? And why would they be of commercial value?
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“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#16
isn't that obvious, John L? haven't you ever be curious about what goes in in your own subconscious while you sleep? for that matter, how about other people's?

is a serial killer's dreams any different than a regular person's?

that way, you have evidence of your dreams and you can analyze how the human mind works on some level, etc. I can see it being valuable to scientists.

and I can also see people wanting to keep a visual record of their own dreams. there are dozens of people all over the world who keeps a journal of their dreams. and this way when it comes up in conversations instead of being bored by somebody's dream story you can say: "If it was as trippy as you say, I want to see the video of it!"
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
relax. it's only the internet!
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#17
I rarely remember dreaming nowadays. Don't know why, but I don't.

Also stealing one's dreams would still be larcenous behavior, for what its worth.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
“Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made up” — Saint Al of the Gore -
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#18
(10-03-2011, 10:44 PM)Aurora Moon Wrote:
(10-03-2011, 09:25 PM)Palladin Wrote: How effective could that technology be for all deaf folks???

It depends on what kind of implant the deaf person might get, and if they're healthy enough both physically and mentally to get one.

Most cochlear implants requires some surgery, which can be highly risky for some people... espeically those who are already on medication, like the blood-thinning type. there's also strong issues with Electronic and electrostatic disruptions that can infer with how effective this implant is. it also causes a deaf person's motor control to go haywire sometimes thanks to the electric impulses caused by cochlear implant devices.

oh, and here's the best part... if a device fails for some reason, the deaf person has to go though surgery ALL OVER AGAIN. after surgical re-implantation, the implantee must go through another month of silence between time of surgery and initial stimulation. this can be really tedious and highly frustrating for those who were just getting used to hearing things.

and for those reasons many deaf people won't get one, no matter how many times other people keep on badgering them to get one.

in fact, many deaf people are highly against this sort of thing... feeling that most deaf people who got implants only did it to appease their parents or did it out of peer pressure from hearing people who simply didn't understand that many were happy or content the way they were.

I can kind of understand that logic, as seeing I do see a lot of hearing people ask about cochlear implants a lot and why most deaf people should have one. it does get annoying after a while.

but on the other hand, if a deaf person genuinely wants to have one, and she/he is doing it for himself/herself and nobody else, I say let her have one.
that woman up above were very clearly happy with the results, despite the disadvantages. S1

http://www.auditoryverbaltraining.com/ha-ci.htm the pros and cons of such implants, in case you're interested. S1

Your link is getting out of date.Ten years old and in need of revision.

The Implant technology and surgical methods have improved considerably.They now offer waterproof devices.

The surgery has become routine for most people.Inpatient surgery and release within 12-24 hours.

I plan to to get one for myself in next 6 month or so.The Hearing Aid I use is the most powerful one available.It is getting old and will need to be replaced.

My long time Audiologist thinks it is time for me to start the process in getting Insurance approval.Since it costs around $35,000 for the surgery and the implant devices.They want to make sure I have reached a level of hearing loss,that justifies the expense.That is why it requires a licensed Audiologist report supporting the interest of the implant candidate.

Also people who are totally deaf (the woman in the video was obviously not). Will have a more difficult time adjusting to the vocalized words,than someone like me who has been hearing them for years.That is because my brain has basic experience in actually hearing them.Thus the transition would be shorter and simpler.

For me personally the positives will outweigh the negatives.But it must be done at the right time.To get the most benefit of an implant.
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#19
I know for certain that I've had a dream or two that was sellable. I had one a few nights ago that was interesting and combined great characters and plot - yet if I tried to remember it now, all the charm and sparkle would be lost. Something about driving up a mountain, with people living at different levels, with varying quirks and histories. After arriving at the top, and reporting in at some kind of ranger station tasked with the protection of the mountain's people, two agents are sent down to assist one person who needed help, and descend from the mountain top to secretly interact with all the myriads of people in the process. The inhabitants are well-adjusted to their mountain, and just finding the way to the 76th level requires mutual aid.

The recounting seems droll, but the experience of the dream was breathtaking.
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#20
(10-08-2011, 11:57 AM)sunsettommy Wrote: Your link is getting out of date.Ten years old and in need of revision.

The Implant technology and surgical methods have improved considerably.They now offer waterproof devices.

The surgery has become routine for most people.Inpatient surgery and release within 12-24 hours.

I plan to to get one for myself in next 6 month or so.The Hearing Aid I use is the most powerful one available.It is getting old and will need to be replaced.

My long time Audiologist thinks it is time for me to start the process in getting Insurance approval.Since it costs around $35,000 for the surgery and the implant devices.They want to make sure I have reached a level of hearing loss,that justifies the expense.That is why it requires a licensed Audiologist report supporting the interest of the implant candidate.

Also people who are totally deaf (the woman in the video was obviously not). Will have a more difficult time adjusting to the vocalized words,than someone like me who has been hearing them for years.That is because my brain has basic experience in actually hearing them.Thus the transition would be shorter and simpler.

For me personally the positives will outweigh the negatives.But it must be done at the right time.To get the most benefit of an implant.

yeah, it mainly depends on each person and if the positives will outweigh the negatives for them.

I haven't actually seen any people with implants in such a long time. but I do remember seeing kids with it a decade ago in school. Man, they were so large and clunky! the children had to wear a certain type of clothing in order to accommodate the implant itself and to make the implant work they had machines strapped to their chest.
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it looked exactly like that, but for the school I went to they came in mostly brown colors.

the deaf school I went to had an program where we could go take classes at the regular schools outside of the deaf boarding school so that we would learn how to socialize with hearing people, and so on forth.

This caused deaf kids with the implants to get stared at a lot by hearing kids... so it didn't exactly help them fit in at a regular school. if anything it practically made them outcasts since how those machines strapped to their chests were a way of signaling to the other kids that they were different.

you know how kids can be cruel. :|

that sort of thing going on was probably why so many deaf people were against it back then. they even had this cartoon:
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and this:
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I googled the cochlear implants to see what they looked like today, and it seems that they made it to look more like hearing aids than anything else today... which is great, as seeing it doesn't make a kid stand out so much like it did back then.

would explain why some deaf people are more accepting of it nowadays. after all it's hard to argue against it when it looks so much like a regular hearing aid today.
Quote: “A society that puts equality… ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality or freedom…a society that puts freedom first will, as a happy by-product, end up with both greater freedom and greater equality.” --Milton Friedman
relax. it's only the internet!
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