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Full Version: Testosterone link to aggression 'all in the mind'
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Quote:Giving women more of the male hormone testosterone can turn them into fairer and more amiable game players, according to tests.

A single dose of testosterone was enough to have this effect, European scientists found, but only if the woman was oblivious to the treatment.

If she realised she had received the hormone and not a dummy drug, she turned to greed and selfishness.

The work in Nature magazine suggests the mind can win over hormones.

Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans, but only because of our own prejudices about its effect rather than its biological activity, suggest the authors.

They believe the same is true in men, although they only studied women.

Power of suggestion

For the study, they asked more than 120 women to pair up and play an "ultimatum" bargaining game with real money at stake.

In the game, one of the pair is the "proposer" and is tasked with suggesting to the other player - the responder - how to split the money between them.

The responder can then only accept or reject the offer.

This puts hormones in their place. Hormones provide a basic backdrop, but changes in levels will do little to behaviour compared to personality, culture and society
Endocrinologist Professor Ashley Grossman

If they reject it, neither of the pair gets any of the cash.

The researchers gave the proposers either a dummy pill or one containing testosterone, but did not tell the women which pill they had been given.

Once they had played the game, the proposers were asked to say which pill they thought they had taken.

Those who received testosterone behaved more fairly, had fewer bargaining conflicts and were better at social interactions.

However, women who thought that they had received testosterone, whether or not they actually did, behaved more unfairly than those who thought that they had received placebo, again whether or not they actually did.

The researchers, led by Ernst Fehr of the University of Zurich, Switzerland, said the results suggested a case of "mind over matter" with the brain overriding body chemistry.

"Whereas other animals may be predominantly under the influence of biological factors such as hormones, biology seems to exert less control over human behaviour," they said.

UK endocrinologist Professor Ashley Grossman said: "This puts hormones in their place.

"Hormones provide a basic backdrop, but changes in levels will do little to behaviour compared to personality, culture and society."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8400172.stm

oh, I can just see debates starting up with this one. :lol:
Quote:Giving women more of the male hormone testosterone can turn them into fairer and more amiable game players, according to tests.

A single dose of testosterone was enough to have this effect, European scientists found, but only if the woman was oblivious to the treatment.

If she realised she had received the hormone and not a dummy drug, she turned to greed and selfishness.

The work in Nature magazine suggests the mind can win over hormones.

Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans, but only because of our own prejudices about its effect rather than its biological activity, suggest the authors.

They believe the same is true in men, although they only studied women.

Power of suggestion

For the study, they asked more than 120 women to pair up and play an "ultimatum" bargaining game with real money at stake.

In the game, one of the pair is the "proposer" and is tasked with suggesting to the other player - the responder - how to split the money between them.

The responder can then only accept or reject the offer.

This puts hormones in their place. Hormones provide a basic backdrop, but changes in levels will do little to behaviour compared to personality, culture and society
Endocrinologist Professor Ashley Grossman

If they reject it, neither of the pair gets any of the cash.

The researchers gave the proposers either a dummy pill or one containing testosterone, but did not tell the women which pill they had been given.

Once they had played the game, the proposers were asked to say which pill they thought they had taken.

Those who received testosterone behaved more fairly, had fewer bargaining conflicts and were better at social interactions.

However, women who thought that they had received testosterone, whether or not they actually did, behaved more unfairly than those who thought that they had received placebo, again whether or not they actually did.

The researchers, led by Ernst Fehr of the University of Zurich, Switzerland, said the results suggested a case of "mind over matter" with the brain overriding body chemistry.

"Whereas other animals may be predominantly under the influence of biological factors such as hormones, biology seems to exert less control over human behaviour," they said.

UK endocrinologist Professor Ashley Grossman said: "This puts hormones in their place.

"Hormones provide a basic backdrop, but changes in levels will do little to behaviour compared to personality, culture and society."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8400172.stm

oh, I can just see debates starting up with this one. :lol:
I'll just sit back and enjoy this one too. 8)
I'll just sit back and enjoy this one too. 8)
Quote:Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans

I always wondered about the source of this instance of consensus "science".....

Did any of the women grew beards or physically attacked other players?
Quote:Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans

I always wondered about the source of this instance of consensus "science".....

Did any of the women grew beards or physically attacked other players?
mv Wrote:
Quote:Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans

I always wondered about the source of this instance of consensus "science".....

Did any of the women grew beards or physically attacked other players?
Because everyone knows beards are sure sign of anti-social behavior. Shock
The article says:
Quote:Those who received testosterone behaved more fairly, had fewer bargaining conflicts and were better at social interactions.

However, women who thought that they had received testosterone, whether or not they actually did, behaved more unfairly than those who thought that they had received placebo, again whether or not they actually did.

So why do they say "Testosterone induces anti-social behaviour in humans"?
That short quotes indicates it isn't testosterone,but,the false idea of what it does that animated the females to act bad when they thought they had received testosterone.
Maybe women have less testosterone receptors than men. They should do the study with men.
I'm sure some would act badly on the placebo, but it also might have the expected effect on the male mind.
Yeah, that placebo drug sure is potent, isn't it?
testosterone definetely increases the female libido.
So a guy should drop a tiny testosterone pill in his cutie's drink to insure a good time? Liquor is dandy but testosterone is quicker? The rhyme is gone.
jt Wrote:So a guy should drop a tiny testosterone pill in his cutie's drink to insure a good time? Liquor is dandy but testosterone is quicker? The rhyme is gone.

"Q" must like hairy little girls. Wink1
The study shows that there are other things besides hormones at work, and these things can sometimes have a stronger effect; but hormones definitely do make a significant contribution.