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Turkey, Russia agree on TL-ruble area in bilateral trade
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Turkey and Russa agreed on Friday that to country will use Turkish Liras (TL) and ruble in bilateral trade instead of any foreign currency such as dollars.
Saturday, 14 February 2009 13:36

World Bulletin / News Desk

Turkey and Russa agreed on Friday that to country will use Turkish Liras (TL) and ruble in bilateral trade instead of any foreign currency such as dollars.

After meeting Russian President Dmitriy Medvedev in Moscow, President Abdullah Gul gave important messages. Gul said, "We are opening a new page with Russia." Gul also said that two countries agreed to use Russian ruble and Turkish lira in their bilateral trade, Turkish media said.

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin had proposed that "Region countries should trade with their own currencies."

Reminding Putin's offer Gul said that "We agreed to use TL-ruble in bilateral trade in our meeting. Russians are anxious about that. If it is actualized, it will contribute to Turkish businessmen for avoiding crisis.

Gul also added that Turkey had to ammend law for acceptation of Russian ruble as convertible currency if this aggrement is actualized.

________________________

Looks like Turkey shares Russia's opinion on multipolar world, at least in business and economy.
Turkish newpapers and media widely covered this event, and commented as ushering a new era in relations between the two countries. Following is from the English version of the news from the Zaman Newspaper.

Russia, Turkey declare new era with ‘strategic’ document

President Abdullah Gül and Russia's President Dmitry Medvedev meet in Moscow for talks on Friday.
The presidents of Russia and Turkey signed a joint declaration in Moscow yesterday aimed at deepening friendly relations and improving multidimensional cooperation between the two countries, with the Russian side defining the declaration as a “strategic document.”

Turkish President Abdullah Gül arrived in Moscow on Thursday, accompanied by State Minister Responsible for Foreign Trade Kürşad Tüzmen and Energy Minister Hilmi Güler, in addition to his spouse, Hayrünnisa Gül, and a large business delegation. Foreign Minister Ali Babacan joined the delegation, traveling from Riga, Latvia, where he paid an official visit, to Moscow late on Thursday.

The four-day visit by Gül, a former foreign minister, to Moscow in his capacity as president was classified as “a state visit” upon the Russian side’s request, although it was earlier planned as “an official visit.” Moscow’s request displayed the importance attached to the visit -- as a state visit is described as the highest level of state protocol -- and made Gül the first Turkish president to ever pay a state visit to Russia.

Gül’s visit officially began yesterday with a welcoming ceremony held ahead of his meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in the Grand Kremlin Palace’s St. George Hall. The Itar-Tass news agency highlighted that the ceremony was required by the protocol.

Speaking ahead of their meeting, Medvedev highlighted bilateral cooperation in the Black Sea region in particular.

"Turkey and Russia are doing much for the maintenance of security in the Black Sea region and the Caucasus in general. We count on strategic cooperation with Turkey in that sphere. I think both our countries are interested in it. We hope such coordination will be maintained," Medvedev said. "I am sure the visit to Russia will become a turning point for bringing our relations to a new, higher level," Gül said.

[Image: gul-medvedev-01.jpg]
President Gül (L) and his Russian counterpart, Medvedev, exchange documents after a signing ceremony. Following their meeting, the two leaders signed a joint declaration which Gül said displayed mutual political will to carry the ongoing multidimensional bilateral cooperation to a further point.

"I believe that this visit will open a new page between our countries," Gül said, underlining that it was a state visit.

Back in December 2004, during a landmark visit to Ankara by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, who was president at the time, the two countries signed a "Joint Declaration on the Intensification of Friendship and Multidimensional Partnership." Putin's visit was the first presidential visit in the history of Turkish-Russian relations since that of Chairman of the Presidium Nikolai Podgorny in 1972. Russia is an important trade partner for Turkey, with a total annual trade volume of $38 billion between the two countries, and has close political relations with common strategic interests, especially in Central Asia and the Caucasus.

President Gül’s visit is being classified as a ‘state visit’ but not an ‘official visit,’ at the Russian side’s request, indicating the importance attached by Moscow to the visit

Turkey depends on Russian energy supplies, but it is also a transit route for Russian energy exports. Russia, Turkey's main supplier of natural gas, is the biggest market for Turkey's construction firms and millions of Russian tourists visit Turkey's Mediterranean coast every year.

Unlike its Western allies, Turkey refrained from strong condemnations of Russia's actions during the outbreak of a brief war between Russia and Georgia last August, fearing such language could hurt its vital economic ties with Russia.

Russia, meanwhile, had denounced US and NATO naval presence in the Black Sea, which can only be accessed via the Turkish Straits, as a "provocation." Later, however, a statement appreciating appropriate implementation of the 1936 Montreux Convention, which governs passage through the Turkish Straits, came from the Russian capital.

Babacan, speaking in Riga ahead of the Moscow visit, advised the United States, NATO and the European Union not to adopt a confrontational attitude in their dealings with Russia.


Medvedev presented flowers to Gül’s wife, Hayrünnisa (below R).

Babacan said Thursday that Turkey and Russia enjoyed "normal, friendly relations," while noting that Russia is Turkey's largest trading partner.

"The key term is cooperation. A strategy of confrontation with Russia is not going to give positive results and risks producing lose-lose outcomes," he warned in response to a question about Russian plans to station Iskander missiles in its Kaliningrad Baltic enclave in response to US plans for a "missile shield" in central and Eastern Europe.

Technical delegation for customs issue

Russia and Turkey agreed to form a joint technical delegation for overcoming ongoing problems that Turkish truck drivers have faced at Russian customs, the Anatolia news agency reported from Moscow yesterday, citing anonymous sources. The decision for establishing such a delegation was made during the meeting between Gül and Medvedev when the former raised the issue, and the proposal for a delegation came from Medvedev, Anatolia said.

Turkey and Russia agreed last September to simplify customs procedures for Turkish goods at a time when the two countries faced serious trade problems that emerged after Russia began to impose tougher inspections on Turkish trucks at border crossings. "We have a multidimensional and strengthened relationship with Russia, and we're pleased to see this relationship improving. When relations are wide and complex to this extent, then problems will naturally occur. These are technical problems. We'll have the opportunity of removing these at the highest-level meetings," Gül said ahead of his visit, in response to a question concerning the issue.

14 February 2009, Saturday
TODAY'S ZAMAN WITH WIRES ANKARA
So, if the Russians complained about our going through the straits which Turkey controls, this might lead to restrictions on what can move through there? If the two are growing closer, where would that leave us?
U.S. Americans must stay in North America between Canada and Mexico.This is your place. :lol:

Just googled "US-Russian strategic relationships" and found this:
Text of the US-Russia Strategic Framework Declaration
Published: April 6, 2008

Run through the text and find what was fulfilled and what was dropped.
That Russia and Turkey may move closer was clear for a while... but conducting trade in two currencies that are likely to fluctuate more than either dollar or euro is strange.

I doubt that even Putin sees ruble as solid...not talking about the Turks.
Green, your linked article was mainly pr with the usual vagueness and homilies signifying nothing.

Would you care to point out what you think has changed?
Read the title once again and the truth will descend upon you. :lol:
Taking into account constant fluctuations of dollars and euros, the best choice would be barter in today's reality.
Well, if the title is all that matters, I got it right away.

Turkey is indeed a focal point politically. I wonder what the ramifications are of this deal, beyond an incremental move towards a bilateral rapprochement.
jt Wrote:beyond an attempt of an incremental move towards a bilateral rapprochement.

(Why am I splitting hairs here? We are transiting to a more multipolar world, various combinations will be tried and most will fail. Recall that Italy was allied with the Central Powers before WWI; and Stalin was a good buddy of Hitler before WWII. I would not take a Russian-Turkish alignment too seriously yet... In fact, a Russian-German alignment is more plausible.)
I agree mv. Such things are, as you say, the new attempts of finding alliances in a multipolar world. Thus they are nascent, and have yet no firm meaning.

The Russians seem to be dabbling in political relations with 3rd world socialists and Iran (a rather limiting version of the old cold war), while the Chinese seem to be pragmatically lining up resource sources. The US seems to be cozying up to India quite well. Europe snoozes.
All true.

Incidentally, while it may be possible for Russia to be friendly with China and India at the same time, being close with both Turkey and Iran is beyond believable.
Such agreement will be effective only if Russia and Turkey have exactly matching trade with each other (no deficit or exedent). Any of the two country which will recieve more money from the other can consider the difference as lost.

Who outside their new trade zone, will want to buy rubbles or Turkish lira?

IMO it's a symbolic move but in practice they will still trade mainly in euros and dollars. It's easier.

They still can try to issue a new common currency like the CFA franc in Africa. And it works.
You gloat about Turkey and Russia but African countries have managed a common trade system independent to euros and dollars for years, much more sophisticated and advanced and nobody ever talks about it.
Because Africa sucks rhino nuts still and probably always will.
we should sink our resources into Africa. pull all our bucks out of Europe and give it to africa. Africa is a bredding ground for terrorists and its going to bite us in the nards sooner or later. if we put Africa back together, or at least large sections of it, we would reap some very serious and long lasting rewards. the people of Africa deserve it. we could come to influence Africa like China influences Asia.
You can't put it together. We spent years with embargos and such to bring down the white-run gov'ts in Africa, only to see that be replaced by tribalism, corruption, and a general decay in the state of things. What went wrong? They have everything in terms of resources, and still they rape, kill, burn each other. The worst brutality comes from Africa.

If Rhodesia's dollar was once more than the pound, despite sanctions and such, and South Africa was the home of the first heart transplant, now they're the land of Mugabe and South Africa is falling apart bit by bit into another third world nation.

You can't win, people have come before us and tried it for years, and they have failed, utterly failed.

Let someone else pour money in that sinkhole and let troops become involved there, like China mabye, hopefully it will help ruin them. But not us, we'll never win and it'll just drain our resources.
sure you can. get a good special ops force out there to hunt and kill these corrupt leaders hell bent on chaos and mass murder. throw the trillions of dollars we are wasting in America into stimulating Africa. take genius entrepeneurs like the Gates' and have them focus on health and sanitary issues. find water resources, build a plumbing infrastructure and get the tribes and people across the continent hydrated. screw getting them jobs, get them agricultured. get them to udnerstand what f*cking AIDS is and how it is spread. give them capitalism and digital TV.

we can do it!
ghoullio Wrote:sure you can. get a good special ops force out there to hunt and kill these corrupt leaders hell bent on chaos and mass murder. throw the trillions of dollars we are wasting in America into stimulating Africa. take genius entrepeneurs like the Gates' and have them focus on health and sanitary issues. find water resources, build a plumbing infrastructure and get the tribes and people across the continent hydrated. screw getting them jobs, get them agricultured. get them to udnerstand what f*cking AIDS is and how it is spread. give them capitalism and digital TV.

we can do it!

No we can't. They, despite our help, still think raping a underage girl, and taking her virginity, is a way to rid themselves of AIDS in South Africa. That is only one of the millions of cultural flaws that will forever doom it to some of the funniest fighting ever. I've seen photos of kids wearing ties and a jester hat shooting at each other.

I talked to alot of South Africans in Iraq, they were either security guys or they ran the maintence on alot of the buildings there, and both black and white said it was a mess in most of the country, that's why they come over to make money in Iraq and then move elsewhere.

You can only kill so many of those "leaders", but when the leaders reflect the people they come from, you going to wipe out whole tribes (not that it wouldn't help things out)?
sure. the bad ones anyway. or lock them up until the people feel secure enough to fight back and put their heads on a pike.

see? compassionate conservatism works S5
ghoullio Wrote:sure you can. get a good special ops force out there to hunt and kill these corrupt leaders hell bent on chaos and mass murder. throw the trillions of dollars we are wasting in America into stimulating Africa. take genius entrepeneurs like the Gates' and have them focus on health and sanitary issues. find water resources, build a plumbing infrastructure and get the tribes and people across the continent hydrated. screw getting them jobs, get them agricultured. get them to udnerstand what f*cking AIDS is and how it is spread. give them capitalism and digital TV.

we can do it!
Huh? Are you proposing going back to earlier times when thing were done the way you describe? I thought it was declared bad and someone even apologized for it. Correct me if I am wrong. Shock
I am all about being imperialistic if it suits us. To be honest, if we don't expand our greatist assets and attributes, we're not helping the world. But imperialism is a money drain, never ends well, and requires the support of the population, which we'll never have again, but most Americans are turds.
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