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Recent Russian exit polls suggest that Medvedev (Putin's appointed successor) received 70% of the popular vote. An easy-to-obtain figure when you consider Putin compelled millions of public sector workers to vote 'United Russia', fraudulently boosting the official turnout after polls close.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/portal/ttv/ne...1441097006
I'm not surprised. Isn't that the way things work in consumate Fascist State?
John L Wrote:I'm not surprised. Isn't that the way things work in consumate Fascist State?
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Well...

Let us now wish Medvedev (The Bear) good luck and hope that the Russian people will look forward to continued prosperity....

track/snake
John L Wrote:Isn't that the way things work in consumate Fascist State?

Russia may be many things, but a consumate Fascist state? I am not so sure!
mcabromb Wrote:
John L Wrote:Isn't that the way things work in consumate Fascist State?

Russia may be many things, but a consumate Fascist state? I am not so sure!

I am. Russia is perhaps the most Fascist state today. Granted, it owns most of it's energy companies(which is socialist), the it's control and regulation over the other means of production clearly make it Fascist.

BTY, are you familiar with the correct definition of Fascism?
John L Wrote:
mcabromb Wrote:
John L Wrote:Isn't that the way things work in consumate Fascist State?

Russia may be many things, but a consumate Fascist state? I am not so sure!

I am. Russia is perhaps the most Fascist state today. Granted, it owns most of it's energy companies(which is socialist), the it's control and regulation over the other means of production clearly make it Fascist.

BTY, are you familiar with the correct definition of Fascism?
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Well...

Is not that the definition of communism (that the state owns the means of production) rather than fascism...
Correct, we finally agree on something T_|S Wink1
By the dictionary definition practically all countries in the world of John L are Fascist, including his own Yankistan.
Check out something on American Fascism and its impact on the world economy(we are in the world crisis of liquidity, mortgage crisis and so on.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Mae
Green Wrote:By the dictionary definition practically all countries in the world of John L are Fascist, including his own Yankistan.
Check out something on American Fascism and its impact on the world economy(we are in the world crisis of liquidity, mortgage crisis and so on.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Mae
and it's just so happens that our (i.e. Russian) government invested money from our, or should I say their (i.e. the government's) as none of us will ever see any of it anyway, stabilization fund in Fannie Mae, I wonder why that is?
Because our economy is so important to Russia's?

Or,Bush put Putin in a headlock and made him do it?
John L Wrote:BTY, are you familiar with the correct definition of Fascism?

John,

I believe so, though I must admit, if I were to solely observe the rhetoric coming from the Kremlin I would be inclined to agree with you that Russia is a fascist state. The heavy-worded statements on national unity (even the party name 'United Russia') could arguably point toward radical nationalism and a centralisation of the economy etc. but often this rhetoric is not followed by action. Often said for the benefit of people who want to hear the right things but paradoxically want to see a quite different course of action laid out for Russia, i.e. national unity while enjoying the benefits of globalization.

Tantamount to this is the encouragement of a liberal capitalist model indicating opposition to a core fundament in the definition of Fascism, namely: the opposition to liberalism in its political and economic form.

While there are extreme elements in Russia's political system that could be equated with fascist parties such as the Zartva or Russian National Unity who encompass white supremacists and neo-nazi's (similar elements exist in Europe and the US), these elements are marginalised and distanced from the seat of power.

But you believe the political system has already reached fascism of sorts... :?:
mcabromb Wrote:Tantamount to this is the encouragement of a liberal capitalist model indicating opposition to a core fundament in the definition of Fascism, namely: the opposition to liberalism in its political and economic form.

:

from where I am there doesn't seem to have been any encouragement of a liberal capitalist economy, if anything the reverse is true, since Putin's accent to power in 2000 small to medium independent businesses have been finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet under the increasing pressure of new taxes and regulations. A lot of them had to close down. It sure was tough in the 1990's with all those protection rings, but at least you could deal with them, as most of those protection rings had relatively reasonable conditions, today with the new officials and KGBers, people are usually given very little choice, you either do things their way or no way, no compromises are tolerated, those who try to resist get hit with fabricated back taxes charges and sent to jail. We are turning into another Belorussia, surely and I'm afraid not very slowly at all.
Henry, I had to straighten out your quote mistake. Sorry.
henrylee100 Wrote:
Green Wrote:By the dictionary definition practically all countries in the world of John L are Fascist, including his own Yankistan.
Check out something on American Fascism and its impact on the world economy(we are in the world crisis of liquidity, mortgage crisis and so on.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Mae
and it's just so happens that our (i.e. Russian) government invested money from our, or should I say their (i.e. the government's) as none of us will ever see any of it anyway, stabilization fund in Fannie Mae, I wonder why that is?
Would you prefer this oil bonanza to stay in the pockets of oil magnates? I think we have learned this lesson already.
Another "fascist" step would be investing the money into state corporations.
Anyway Fannie Mae has AAA rating and the government is prescribed to invest Fund into such low-income, high-liquidity instruments, which Fannie Mae (according to Western rating agencies) is.
henrylee100 Wrote:from where I am there doesn't seem to have been any encouragement of a liberal capitalist economy, if anything the reverse is true, since Putin's accent to power in 2000 small to medium independent businesses have been finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet under the increasing pressure of new taxes and regulations. A lot of them had to close down. It sure was tough in the 1990's with all those protection rings, but at least you could deal with them, as most of those protection rings had relatively reasonable conditions, today with the new officials and KGBers, people are usually given very little choice, you either do things their way or no way, no compromises are tolerated, those who try to resist get hit with fabricated back taxes charges and sent to jail. We are turning into another Belorussia, surely and I'm afraid not very slowly at all.
I think you should prop your words with a pinch of statistic.

And by the way, enjoy this. Reality show, how to run successful business from scratch in a shyt-hole of Russia.
Green Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:
Green Wrote:By the dictionary definition practically all countries in the world of John L are Fascist, including his own Yankistan.
Check out something on American Fascism and its impact on the world economy(we are in the world crisis of liquidity, mortgage crisis and so on.)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Mae
and it's just so happens that our (i.e. Russian) government invested money from our, or should I say their (i.e. the government's) as none of us will ever see any of it anyway, stabilization fund in Fannie Mae, I wonder why that is?
Would you prefer this oil bonanza to stay in the pockets of oil magnates? I think we have learned this lesson already.
Another "fascist" step would be investing the money into state corporations.
Anyway Fannie Mae has AAA rating and the government is prescribed to invest Fund into such low-income, high-liquidity instruments, which Fannie Mae (according to Western rating agencies) is.
and whose pockets do you think all this money eventually ends up in? I'm certainly not seeing any of it, are you? This whole stabilization fund smells of a rat, how on earth does our government manage to have extra cash in a country that has an outdated infrastructure, no roads outside Moscow to speak of, non existent health-care, no state pensions (what they currently pay hardly covers utility bills and so for all intents and purposes it's tantamount to no pensions at all) and the list can go on and on. To me the whole thing looks like a rather straightforward scheme of funneling the money out of the country so individuals with proper knowledge and access can then easily help themselves to it. Mark my words, when the current crooks finally get ousted from the Kremlin, their successors will find there is no stabilization fund left, even they won't ever have been officially used.
As for learning lessons, I don't think we are capable of learning anything. And here's another contradiction that I can't figure out, Medvedev et all all keep talking about how terrible the housing problem in Russia is, how lots of people live in slums and how there is a shortage of quality housing and how the way to solve this problem is to try and create a system whereby ordinary Russians could have access to cheap mortgages, now how come then, that instead of creating such a system, which by the way could be modeled on Fannie Mae or Ginnie Mae or whatever, they instead take "our" oil money and essentially give it to the Americans so they can have cheap mortgages?
Green Wrote:
henrylee100 Wrote:from where I am there doesn't seem to have been any encouragement of a liberal capitalist economy, if anything the reverse is true, since Putin's accent to power in 2000 small to medium independent businesses have been finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet under the increasing pressure of new taxes and regulations. A lot of them had to close down. It sure was tough in the 1990's with all those protection rings, but at least you could deal with them, as most of those protection rings had relatively reasonable conditions, today with the new officials and KGBers, people are usually given very little choice, you either do things their way or no way, no compromises are tolerated, those who try to resist get hit with fabricated back taxes charges and sent to jail. We are turning into another Belorussia, surely and I'm afraid not very slowly at all.
I think you should prop your words with a pinch of statistic.

And by the way, enjoy this. Reality show, how to run successful business from scratch in a shyt-hole of Russia.
I don't have any statistics unfortunately, but plenty of anecdotal evidence as is that reality blog, yet some of the latest news has been quite worrying, they went after Eldorado and jailed the owner of Arbat Prestige, yes you can develop a successful business in Russia, but what will happen to you once it really takes off? As some of the recent developments indicate, chances are you just might wind up in jail after they pass a new law under which you were supposed to have paid some tax which didn't even exist when you started out.
Quote:and whose pockets do you think all this money eventually ends up in? I'm certainly not seeing any of it, are you?
You are talking about Santa Claus and say he doesn't exist, while in reality he does exist.
**********************************************
This Santa Claus is the kindergarden's plumber. Shock
**********************************************
The plumber is real, you should believe me.
And people don't riot against Santa because he talks truth about their incomes' growth however sickening he smells sometimes.

There are hundreds of ways to make money in Russia and abroad.
I've met people who live in a shabby 2-room flat and drive a new $50000 cabrio.
Quote:
henrylee100 Wrote:I think you should prop your words with a pinch of statistic.

And by the way, enjoy this. Reality show, how to run successful business from scratch in a shyt-hole of Russia.
I don't have any statistics unfortunately, but plenty of anecdotal evidence as is that reality blog, yet some of the latest news has been quite worrying, they went after Eldorado and jailed the owner of Arbat Prestige, yes you can develop a successful business in Russia, but what will happen to you once it really takes off? As some of the recent developments indicate, chances are you just might wind up in jail after they pass a new law under which you were supposed to have paid some tax which didn't even exist when you started out.
Unfortunately Mogilevich is and was a criminal with a long history.
Read Pravda.
Quote:FBI put Mogilewich in 2003 on the "Wanted by the FBI List" for participation in scheme to defraud investors in Canadian company YBM Magnex International Inc.
Let's be happy we got rid of this scum.
Green Wrote:
Quote:and whose pockets do you think all this money eventually ends up in? I'm certainly not seeing any of it, are you?
You are talking about Santa Claus and say he doesn't exist, while in reality he does exist.
**********************************************
This Santa Claus is the kindergarden's plumber. Shock
**********************************************
The plumber is real, you should believe me.
And people don't riot against Santa because he talks truth about their incomes' growth however sickening he smells sometimes.

There are hundreds of ways to make money in Russia and abroad.
I've met people who live in a shabby 2-room flat and drive a new $50000 cabrio.
what Santa isn't telling you is the real rate of inflation which pretty much offsets this growth in income.
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