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Do you have cold sores all the time? Well, you might forget them soon.

http://www.personalmd.com/news/a1997012401.shtml
Quote:Cold Sore Virus Linked To Alzheimer's

People who carry an Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene may be at greater risk for the memory-robbing disorder if they are also infected with herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) -- the virus that causes cold sores.

The new study of brain tissue samples found that HSV-1 was more common in those with apolipoprotein (Apo) E-4 gene. There are three types of the gene: E-2, E-3 and E-4. All individuals carry two copies of Apo E -- one from each parent -- and those with the E-4 variant have an increased susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

"The risk of (Alzheimer's disease) is high in people who have at least one Apo E-4 allele and who have HSV-1 DNA in at least one of the brain regions examined, whereas those with either factor alone are not at increased risk," write the study authors.

"These results suggest that Apo E-4 is associated with a marginal risk of Alzheimer's disease, but that the risk is greatly increased when Apo E-4 occurs in conjunction with HSV-1," wrote senior investigator Dr. Gordon Jamieson, of the Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory at University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology in England. "HSV-1 alone is not a risk factor."

Jamieson and colleagues analyzed brain tissue samples from 90 Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's disease patients, according to the report in the current issue of The Lancet. They found that 53% of Alzheimer's disease patients with HSV-1 also had the Apo E-4 allele, compared to just 10% of Alzheimer's patients who did not carry the herpes virus.

In those without the memory disorder, only 4% had both HSV-1 and Apo E-4, and 6% had Apo E-4 without the virus.

The findings may explain why anti-inflammatory drugs seem to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease symptoms.

"Inflammation can lead to reactivation of HSV-1, so such drugs could reduce the extent of reactivation and the damage caused" they wrote.

However, the new study is very small and needs to be confirmed, according to Dr. Norman Relkin, an associate professor of neurology and neurosciences at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center in New York.

"I certainly wouldn't advise cold sore sufferers to be especially concerned about developing dementia on the basis of this one study," he said.

HSV-1 is a ubiquitous virus that infects the majority of people in childhood, causing blisters to erupt on the skin or lips. The virus then retreats to the nervous system -- usually lurking in the facial nerves -- until factors such as stress or ultraviolet light reactivate it.

"If you take the overall concept to be that Alzheimer's disease is caused by an interaction of inherited factors and exposure to other agents in the environment -- I think most of us would agree with that. But I think this particular study is much too small to draw firm conclusions about herpes virus as a specific risk factor," Relkin said. "I think it's an interesting observation that bears further examination," he concluded.
Hmm... there was not much Herpes around until the Vietnam war... now, when was Alzheimer invented?

And anyway, what is exactly wrong with simply not getting Herpes?
mv Wrote:Hmm... there was not much Herpes around until the Vietnam war... now, when was Alzheimer invented?

And anyway, what is exactly wrong with simply not getting Herpes?

He is referring to the simplex form of herpies. you know, the ones that periodically pop up in your mouth, usually under a lip, when you have an infection or cold. I just got one yesterday, but have not had one for over a year now. Some people get them quite often.
Ooops. Misunderstood this. Now, this is indeed interesting.
John Wrote:He is referring to the simplex form of herpies.
Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1) is the one that commonly causes 'cold sores'; HSV1 is the virus considered in this survey. The sexually transmitted one is a variant of the Simplex Virus referred to as HSV2. If there is indeed a connection between HSV1 and an increased susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease, it is highly probable that a similar link exists with HSV2.

The prevalence of HSV1 in the US is around 60%, HSV2 about 20%.

Source
Monsieur Le Tonk Wrote:
John Wrote:He is referring to the simplex form of herpies.
Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1) is the one that commonly causes 'cold sores'; HSV1 is the virus considered in this survey. The sexually transmitted one is a variant of the Simplex Virus referred to as HSV2. If there is indeed a connection between HSV1 and an increased susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease, it is highly probable that a similar link exists with HSV2.

The prevalence of HSV1 in the US is around 60%, HSV2 about 20%.

Source
True, Tonk. And, one can get (genital) Herpes Simplex I (cold sores) as well through oral sex. Not as serious an outbreak as Simplex II, but still painful. And, anyone who has ever had chicken pox has the Herpes virus in their spinal cord where it rests until some incident (such as stress or low immune) causes it to raise its ugly head..........cold sores.

So, looks like a lot of us will be at risk because of the chicken pox-thing. Surely, not every one who has had the pox is at risk............there's gotta be something else involved. ??
SoloNav Wrote:anyone who has ever had chicken pox has the Herpes virus in their spinal cord where it rests until some incident (such as stress or low immune) causes it to raise its ugly head..........cold sores.
I think Shingles is also a result of the reactivation of the Chicken-pox virus.
SoloNav Wrote:Surely, not every one who has had the pox is at risk............there's gotta be something else involved. ??
This is the important bit...
Dr. Norman Relkin Wrote:"If you take the overall concept to be that Alzheimer's disease is caused by an interaction of inherited factors and exposure to other agents in the environment -- I think most of us would agree with that. But I think this particular study is much too small to draw firm conclusions about herpes virus as a specific risk factor," Relkin said. "I think it's an interesting observation that bears further examination," he concluded.
Sooner or later, there is something that will kill off our mode of transport. It's only a matter of time. Until the advent of genetic regeneration, it's one big turkey shoot. Wink1
Monsieur Le Tonk Wrote:
SoloNav Wrote:anyone who has ever had chicken pox has the Herpes virus in their spinal cord where it rests until some incident (such as stress or low immune) causes it to raise its ugly head..........cold sores.
I think Shingles is also a result of the reactivation of the Chicken-pox virus.
Yes, I had forgotten about shingles. Most painful.

And, I hadn't read the complete article. Glad you pointed out the facts. I'm at work.
We definitely need to come up with some effective viricides, that do not merely suppress viruses, but eliminate them.
Impossible: viruses are a part of your own genetic code...
mv Wrote:Impossible: viruses are a part of your own genetic code...

They override the cellular machinery with their own set of instructions ... how do you figure that equates to being part of our own blueprints??
To override cellular machinery they need to have a program that is pretty similar to the programs in our own DNA. In fact, many viruses simply embed themselves into our DNA.

Since they are so similar to our own material, there can be really no way to design a drug that kills them and does not destroy human DNA. One can only target them when they are involved in doing something that the human DNA does not do: then you target this process. This is how AIDS drugs work: they all target abnormal viral activities. But if a virus simply sits quietly, especially within our DNA, there can be no way to get to it.

--

On an aside, with my fish, now that I have pretty decent skills I can whack any parasitic disease with relative ease; I can deal with most bacterial diseases; but viruses -- hopeless. The only bright spot is that viral diseases are not that common.
There have been actual viricides developed. A few years ago, ViroPharma was prepared to market a viricide called Pleconaril, which had a specially shaped molecule that attached to the key sites in the viruses' outer shell (which enabled them to "lock onto" cell walls, so they could then penetrate the walls and head for the nucleus) and blocked them so they could not attach to cell walls. The inert viruses then were simply shed from the body through urine, etc. Clinical trials including phase three trials with humans proved that it worked with a long list of piconoviruses, the main viruses that cause colds. It also was shown effective against a number of other viruses, including some that were fatal to infants, and for which no other remedy existed. The true cure for the common cold, and a proven life-saving medicine, was never brought to market, because the Clinton-staffed approvals board of the FDA decided not to approve it because it might lessen the effectiveness of some common birth control medications.

But this shows that there is a way to neutralize viruses and remove them from the body before they can infect cells.