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Full Version: More of Poor England: Pull your teeth DYI
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Patients pull own teeth as dental contract falters

Your favorite lefty paper, the Guardian, is reporting new successes of universal health care:

Quote:Large numbers of people are going without dental treatment and some even report extracting their own teeth because they cannot find an NHS dentist in their area, a survey reveals today.
..........
6% of the respondents said they were self-treating, which often included pulling out their own troublesome teeth. "Fourteen teeth have had to be removed by myself using pliers," said one Lancashire respondent. "Have pulled teeth out before, easier than finding a dentist," said one in Hull. "Because I could not afford the treatment cost, I had to extract my own tooth on one occasion," said one in Harrow. "I took most of my teeth out in the shed with pliers. I have one to go," said another in Wiltshire.

I feel deep respect for the guy who pulled out 14 of his teeth....but would not it be better to team up with a neighbor and pull each others' teeth? :roll:
Please,give us socialized medicine here,faster!
In truth, they probably cosmetically looked better sans the teeth anyway. Blokes have noteriously had the worst teeth in Europe to begin with. A nice set of dentures would go a long way to helping them look better.
Here is an interesting article from the Independent, my favorite Collectivist Left Wing Bloke rag. Aparently they have things down pat for a change

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Quote:WHAT IS WRONG WITH NHS DENTISTRY?

The British government claims there are more dentists working in the government-run National Health Service (NHS) than ever before. Yet people unable to find an NHS dentist have become so desperate that some are resorting to pulling their own teeth, says the Independent.

One of the main reasons for the shortage is that dentists are free to divide their time between NHS work and private work as they choose. What is confusing for patients is that the same dentist may offer NHS and private treatment:

-For example, if the payment for one filling is the same as the payment for six, then there is a big incentive for dentists to accept the easy patients with good dental health on the NHS and insist that the complex patients who require lots of fillings pay privately.

-Although they are not allowed to discriminate, this is hard to police because a dentist can refuse a patient NHS treatment on a variety of grounds.

-For example, they may say they are saving their NHS budget (fixed annually in advance) to treat children and people in pain.

Dentists will often choose private because the pay is better. They also say the higher rates they can charge means that they can spend more time with patients and do better quality work, which is more satisfying.

The trend to go private accelerated in April 2006 with the introduction of a new NHS contract which irritated dentists, says the Independent. What was once a sellers' market -- with private dentists chasing upmarket clients -- has now become a buyers' market as more dentists have switched more of their work out of the NHS, driving patients into the private sector.