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As the saying goes, it takes a period of fifty years, following the death of a president, for his actions and policies to be accurately evaluated. We are currently seeing this with FDR today. However, with the case of one James Earle Carter Jr., I suspect that the rule will be broken early on, if not before his demise. I find no reason to see that any one person, who ever occupied the White House will ever receive the failing marks as has he.

Case in point is his foreign policy. The entire policy was characterized by accute emotionalism, and a utopian outlook on what should be, rather than what was humanly possible. Even today, he has amplified his lack of logic to a new level. But the one glaring failure, that has affected one country more than anything else has been his policy with regards to Zimbabwe, and his support of the avowed MarxistRobert Mugabe. No country in Africa, with the possible exception of it's southern neighbor, possessed the riches or potential of that of Zimbabwe. Even Uganda, another rich nation, does not come close.

Natural resources: coal, chromium ore, asbestos, gold, nickel, copper, iron ore, vanadium, lithium, tin, platinum group metals

Yet since assuming power Mugabe has slowly and surely ground this blessed country into the dustbin of failure. And Carter has this failure on his shoulders. In How Tyranny Came to Zimbabwe the slow slide into poverty and ruin is highlighted. And it is certainly not a pretty one. But it only highlights how Collectivist/Marxist/Socialist doctrine can only lead to failure, when a country has so much to offer it's citizens in the form of natural resources.


Quote:History will not look kindly on those in the West who insisted on bringing the avowed Marxist Mugabe into the government. In particular, the Jimmy Carter foreign policy--feckless in the Iranian hostage crisis, irresolute in the face of mounting Soviet ambitions, and noted in the post-White House years for dalliances with dictators the world over--bears some responsibility for the fate of a small African country with scant connection to American national interests. In response to Carter's comment last month that the Bush administration's foreign policy was the "worst in history," critics immediately cited those well-publicized failures. But the betrayal of Bishop Muzorewa and of all Zimbabweans, black and white, who warned what sort of leader Robert Mugabe would be deserves just as prominent a place among the outrages of the Carter years.

For those, who tend to dismiss this appraisal, here is another, Digging a Grave For Zimbabwe. It is so disheartening to see what has become of such potential. Can you think of any other reasons to fight Collectivist application?
John,

I have a perspective on Zimbabwe that shares the laments,but more personally due to my missionary friends. I occasionally receive forwarded e-mails from pastors in Zimbabwe and it is heartbreaking to read their distress.

I recall Bishop Muzorewa well as a moderate gentleman who would have greatly assisted the transition from white to majority rule. Socialism and cronyism have ruined a really wonderful nation.

This nation is suffering terribly. I will have to say this for Mugabe,unlike Chavez,he has not interferred with Christian missionary work so far so long as the Church pastors do NOT entertain public political opposition to him. Our missionaries have been free to do their work and I have to give Robert that much credit.

Another case of the US involving ourselves where it was not our concern,IMO. Then,choosing the worst guy on the block.
Palladin Wrote:Another case of the US involving ourselves where it was not our concern,IMO. Then,choosing the worst guy on the block.

I still can't decide if it is the idea of 'pocket dictators', or Collectivists, who really turn him on. Perhaps both.
What turns Carter on are men who hate the United States of America. I doubt he cares if they are dictators or elected officials.
Mugabe is as much a communist as John is honest. :lol: Zimbabwean society resembles the American one most, protectionism, corporate welfare, cronyism, corruption, personal cult, military cult, rassism. A fine sample where neo-con policies lead to.
I remember the time when Rhodesia became Zimbabwe, we backed a guy named Nkomo, but he lost the elections to that wacko Mugabe. Nkomo's organisation was later accused (and destroyed) of plotting a coup against Mugabe, a set up by the South African and American intelligence services fearing Zimbabwe could go communist.
Personally,I do not believe the US CIA has ever succeeded in any operation like this. It's an expensive bad joke on the American taxpayers.

I WISH we could change governments at will like that. We couldn't even change Haiti's and Panama's w/o military interventions,what a joke the CIA is.
quadrat Wrote:Mugabe is as much a communist as John is honest.

Well, thank you very much for the outstanding endorcement "Q". I really appreciate this, that at least someone honours my integtity. I'll attempt to return the compliment sometime, in the near future. S1
Bush's weakness now could be compared to Carter's, perhaps. One historian I have recently read said that diplomacy only works from a clear position of strength. Specifically, as soon as Bush weakened his stance in the ME, the situation began to disintegrate. We have the MSM to thank for this.
JT,

No,we have the people of the USA to blame for this. We're the collective group who has the 3 week attention/toughness span for conflict anymore.
Just watched a small documentary about Zimbabwe, it said the unemployment rate is at 80%. Surely an all time world record? Inflation was about 3,500 per year, that's still some way off from Germany's record in the great depression, they did occassionally 3,500% per day. On the other hand, Mugabe is still alive, able to learn and he's got further reforms in mind. Zimbabwe is also one of the world leaders in creating refugees, though still a long way behind Afghanistan and Iraq, those two profiting from the liberties and democracy the Americans bring. I wonder why so many millions of people in those nations chose to run away? Iran houses now about 4m Afghan refugees.
Q: can you expand on how "the Americans brought liberties and democracy to Zimbabwe"? I'm not sure I can follow the gist of your argument.
jt Wrote:Q: can you expand on how "the Americans brought liberties and democracy to Zimbabwe"? I'm not sure I can follow the gist of your argument.

Waste of time: don't even try.
jt,
learning to read would be a good start. John, don't even try. A waste of time. :lol:
Here is Mugabe's latest threat. And note his typical Statist approach, totally without regard to even a modest economic knowledge. This is definately a "lose-lose" situation for businesses, with the world's largest inflation(4500%/year). If you don't give it away almost free, you will be jailed. If you Do give it away almost free, you go bankrupt. I think that is called a "Hobbson's Choice". Wink1

Quote:
Mugabe warns firms against halting production



By MacDonald Dzirutwe



HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe on Friday told manufacturers to carry on with normal production despite an official price freeze, warning that his government would seize firms that stopped producing basic goods.



Mugabe was addressing thousands of ruling ZANU-PF party supporters in Harare, some who had earlier marched through Zimbabwe's capital in support of the freeze introduced to curb the world's highest inflation rate of over 4,500 percent.
Haven't heard any fat ladies singin' ... but it's looking faintly possible that Bob may be bobbing out.

... anyone heard any similar rumors about Carter negotiating a 'graceful' exit? :twisted:
Screw Zimbabwe, I still think of it as Rhodesia. We should have never turned our backs on the Whites that were the backbone of that country.
The fat lady may have just been mumbling anyway ...

... probably more likely that the guy's going to be leaving in pieces ... eventually.
When he finally has to make the mad dash to the airport, let's hope he is headed to SA, where he and DaDa can play bridge together, and tell lies all day long. They are too old for cricket anyway.
John L Wrote:When he finally has to make the mad dash to the airport, let's hope he is headed to SA, where he and DaDa can play bridge together, and tell lies all day long. They are too old for cricket anyway.

Yeah, but the other possibility is a charming little analogy that I heard today applied to Hillary Clinton (regarding the nomination) about Elena Ceausescu's last snarl being something to the effect of:

"Don't you know who I am?"

... right about the time the firing squad was taking aim.
mr_yak Wrote:
John L Wrote:When he finally has to make the mad dash to the airport, let's hope he is headed to SA, where he and DaDa can play bridge together, and tell lies all day long. They are too old for cricket anyway.

Yeah, but the other possibility is a charming little analogy that I heard today applied to Hillary Clinton (regarding the nomination) about Elena Ceausescu's last snarl being something to the effect of:

"Don't you know who I am?"

... right about the time the firing squad was taking aim.

That is assuming he does not complete his mad dash to the airport. Wink1
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