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BICEP2 Press Conference - March 17, 2014
At a press conference on March 17, 2014, the BICEP2 Collaboration presented measurements of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. These measurements represent the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation and the first direct image of primordial gravitational waves. Press conference participants were the leader of BICEP2, John M. Kovac (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Chao-Lin Kuo (Stanford/SLAC), Jamie Bock (Caltech/JPL), Clem Pryke (University of Minnesota), and Marc Kamionkowski (Johns Hopkins University).

One more Ort Cloud planetoid discovered: Newfound pink world lurks at solar system fringes.

[Image: b7cf122afc33920b4f0f6a7067004f47.jpg]

Here's a second article about it.
Norwegian sky diver has near collision with meteorite.

Incidentally, lots of people are not believing all this, in the article, or in the below video. Check out the responses.

This revelation from NASA really makes sense, if you think about it. Nasa: Habitable Climates of 'Tilt-a-World' See-Sawing Planets Could Contain Life

Quote:The findings, which are published in the journal Astrobiology, have expanded the perceived habitable zone by 10 to 20%, increasing the number of potentially habitable worlds.

The climate effects generated on these wobbling worlds could prevent glaciers from forming across the surface, even if the planets are far from their stars. They are turned on their orbital plane by the influence of nearby planets, which evenly distributes heat from their host star.

As some of the remaining liquid remains on the surface in the long-term, such planets could maintain favourable conditions for life. Further out from the star's habitable zone, global ice gathers and makes life impossible.

Shawn Domagal-Goldman, an astrobiologist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, said: "Planets like these are far enough from their stars that it would be easy to write them off as frozen, and poor targets for exploration, but in fact, they might be well-suited to supporting life. This could expand our idea of what a habitable planet looks like and where habitable planets might be found."

The tilt-a-world becomes potentially habitable because its spin causes the poles to occasionally point towards its host star, which causes the ice caps to quickly melt.
(04-12-2014, 09:10 PM)Grizzly Wrote: [ -> ]Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15: Complete Coverage of the Blood Moon

Sounds good! Post pics when you get back.

[Image: spaceballs.gif]
Incidentally Grizz, did you see where a newly discovered(last month) asteroid whizzed by us at .87 lunar distances. And looking at it at this site, one wonders if it was measured by length, or width.

[Image: 445701-asteroid-representational-image-p...t-nasa.jpg]

Quote:According to NASA's Asteroid Watch project based at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the asteroid was about 7.6 meters (25 feet) wide. It came within 299,338 kilometers (186,000 miles) of Earth on Saturday morning and made its closest approach at 4.13 am EDT (1.43 pm IST and 8.13 am GMT).
(05-06-2014, 01:02 PM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]Incidentally Patrick, did you see where a newly discovered(last month) asteroid whizzed by us at .87 lunar distances. And looking at it at this site, one wonders if it was measured by length, or width.
Quote:According to NASA's Asteroid Watch project based at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the asteroid was about 7.6 meters (25 feet) wide. It came within 299,338 kilometers (186,000 miles) of Earth on Saturday morning and made its closest approach at 4.13 am EDT (1.43 pm IST and 8.13 am GMT).

(HL129 asteroid was discovered only on 28 April (Wednesday) by the astronomers with the Mt. Lemmon Survey team)

The men of the night watch may be ill equipped & less than diligent but there is little or nothing we could do with their warnings should they materialize.
(03-27-2014, 01:34 AM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]One more Ort Cloud planetoid discovered: Newfound pink world lurks at solar system fringes.

[Image: b7cf122afc33920b4f0f6a7067004f47.jpg]

Here's a second article about it.

I always wondered if there were planets or planetoids completely outside our solar system, midway between two stars...
I'm sure there are Fred. They're just rogues, moving all over the place, in any which direction, until captured by the gravity well of another solar system.
Objects too small to be a star have been detected.
They are between 4 and 13x the mass of Jupiter.
Maybe we will discover smaller and smaller rogue planets in the future.

CFBDSIR_2149-0403

Cha_110913-773444

WISE 0855–0714

The Barnardt Star, a red dwarf 6 ly close to the sun is 150x he mass of Jupiter.
It's interresting that the Barnard's star has the same size as the rogue planets above...

[Image: xbarnards_star_small.jpg.pagespeed.ic.C6X3nUCEnr.jpg]

[Image: 640px-PIA18003-NASA-WISE-StarsNearSun-20140425-2.png]
Fred, your first link is not correct. Please check it out, ok?
This is supposed to be going down this Sunday.

‘Beast’ Asteroid That Will Buzz By Earth Big Enough To Wipe Out A City

Quote:“The Beast” is coming! That’s the nickname astronomers have given to an asteroid that will nearly sideswipe Earth this Sunday, reports Space.com.

Near-Earth asteroid 2014 HQ124 will be a mere 777,000 miles at its closest approach to our planet, that’s just over 3 times the distance from the Earth to the moon; a close shave by cosmic standards.

Observers assure us that there is no chance of a collision, but they do say this fly-by illustrates the danger of a meteor strike.

2014 HQ124 is 1,100 feet wide and is traveling about 31,000 mph, relative to Earth. If it was on a collision course, the planet’s gravity would actually increase its speed to about 40,000 mph at impact.

“This one would definitely be catastrophic if it hit the Earth,” asteroid impact expert Mark Boslough, of Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, said during a webcast produced by the online Slooh community observatory.
(06-07-2014, 04:20 PM)Grizzly Wrote: [ -> ]This is supposed to be going down this Sunday.

‘Beast’ Asteroid That Will Buzz By Earth Big Enough To Wipe Out A City

Quote:“The Beast” is coming! That’s the nickname astronomers have given to an asteroid that will nearly sideswipe Earth this Sunday, reports Space.com.

Near-Earth asteroid 2014 HQ124 will be a mere 777,000 miles at its closest approach to our planet, that’s just over 3 times the distance from the Earth to the moon; a close shave by cosmic standards.

Observers assure us that there is no chance of a collision, but they do say this fly-by illustrates the danger of a meteor strike.

2014 HQ124 is 1,100 feet wide and is traveling about 31,000 mph, relative to Earth. If it was on a collision course, the planet’s gravity would actually increase its speed to about 40,000 mph at impact.

“This one would definitely be catastrophic if it hit the Earth,” asteroid impact expert Mark Boslough, of Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, said during a webcast produced by the online Slooh community observatory.

Very interesting Patrick. I also went to SpaceWeather.com, and they have it on their list, but they say it is only 160Metres in width. I wonder why the difference, unless one is measuring across the long side, and the other the short width.

How Asteroids are named

But what is more alarming is that it was not discovered until April sixteenth of this year. And there were a lot of them discovered in order to rate three numbers after the 'HQ' part. The fact that this one was big enough to really cause such havoc, and not be seen before April, can be worrisome.

Here's something else too.

Quote:“If it hit a city, it would definitely wipe out an entire metropolitan area,” he added.

If 2014 HQ124 is one solid piece of rock, it’ not certain what the asteroid is made of, the impact would unleash an explosion with a yield of about 2,000 megatons.

“You’d end up with a crater about 3 miles across,” Boslough said. “An event like that would break windows over 100 kilometers away.”

And it would do far more than that. Every tectonic plate under stress would suddenly be shaken loose, causing countless earthquakes. Volcanoes all over the world would start doing their thing. And the worst effect would be on the exact opposite point on the globe, where all the radiating ripple of energy would come all together as one on this thin floating crust. The local damage would be just a down payment.

And we are worried about Global Warming? Jeese.......................................
It will come far from Earth. 3 times the Moon-Earth distance, it's further away than your local grocery store.

And it's too small to affect tectonic plates across the globe. At best it can crack the mantel crust localy, creating a good earthquake or a tsunami. But no "2012" effect.
I never watched "2012", and don't really care if I never see such a waste of special effects. Granted it will be 3.3LDs, but the fact that it took this long to discover it does not really bode all that well.

As for your last part Fred, you are wrong. Something coming in at that speed, with that much kinetic energy, will have a world wide effect. Let's just hope we never have to witness it.
It takes long to discover because our technology is very primitive relative to other galactic civilisations who have fully secured their perimeters long ago.
We are at the stone age of space exploration. We are nowhere near controlling cosmic events.

JL Wrote:As for your last part Fred, you are wrong. Something coming in at that speed, with that much kinetic energy, will have a world wide effect. Let's just hope we never have to witness it.
I think there won't be any ripple effect below a 20 km diameter, and hundreds times heavier than a 1 km large impactor.
It's just not proportional. Just look how 1km looks on a globe. It's a grain of sand.

"2012". Scientificaly it's ridiculous. So are most sci-fi movies. But entertaining.
Now, this is really an interesting story.

[Image: cgijibi93ptziudddqjv.gif]

Its what is known as a Light Echo, obviously very closely related to a Nova.

Here's Wikipedia on V838 Monocerotis. And note the theories floating about which could be the possible causes of this.

Quote:- An atypical nova outbursts (this is very unlikely.)

- A thermal pulse of a dying star (the new pulse illuminates the layers of star material previously ejected its previous outbursts.)

- A thermonuclear event withing a massive supergiant (in which the helium in one of the layers of the massive star ignites and starts a fusion process.)

- A mergeburst (the burst caused by the merge of two main sequence stars.)

- A planetary capture event (in which the star has swallowed one of its giant gas planets.)

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