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The question is if these reservoirs are closed or opened. The former would not be detectable from orbit, the latter would suffer from evaporation.

(Still, no problems with "Why not").
My thinking is that two things are going on at the same time.

First, water is being forced upward, due to some natural occurring series of events. Also, with an arid environment, much can be evaporated and moved out of the atmosphere.

But secondly, water is also being bombarded from space, and comets, so as to make up for the evaporation. The surface would tend to suck up water and sequester it below the surface, in a never ending cycle.

While there is almost no surface water, except at the poles, I feel comfortable that the planet is just heaping with underground water. And because there is still a heat from within, much of it will naturally be liquid, AND could harbour life.
(02-16-2014, 10:56 PM)Grizzly Wrote: [ -> ]Asteroid passing by on Monday.

Huge Asteroid to Fly Safely By Earth Monday: Watch It Live

I was going through the list of NEOs, over at SpaceWeather.com, earlier, and I noted that there was a few pretty big ones whizzing by. The one you mention is 195 metres, but 8.8 LDs away.

But what your article left out is the fact that on the 10th of February, just six days ago, we had an even larger asteroid shoot by, and even closer. It was 2006 DP 14, some 730 metres, and 6.2 LDs. The link above states that it was estimated size of 460 m - 1.0 km, but NASA was a bit more specific. Now that one was really big. If we had that one slam into us, you can forget about politics for about a millennium or more. S5

Oh, and there are a couple more, within the next month, which are over 200 metres, and within 8 LDs. Hell, its a virtual shooting gallery out there, and far more important than all that AGW crap. We really do need to get our priorities straight.
Shooting gallery is right. Just take a thoughtful look at the Moon. What if most of those impacts took place over a few thousand years (and mostly during the time of the Genesis Flood), rather than over a period of billions of years? And remember that if it were not for erosion caused by earth's atmosphere and biosphere, the surface of the earth would look just as pock-marked as the surface of the Moon.
Amazing Milky Way Photo by Photographer Anton Jankovoy


[Image: 0000c891_big.jpeg]
Everybody is mad about two grams of ice on the soil of Mars but nobody pay attention to huge amount of water found on Mercury, the last place in the solar system where you would expect it.
Fred, if water is all over the place, including this solar system, then why wouldn't it also be found on Mercury as well? Even when heated, it still retains its molecular construction. And remember, as comets pass by the sun, they are releasing all sorts of gases, including water vapor, which vent from within such objects.
NASA is making official what SciFi enthusiasts have taken for granted, since...............................well, since SciFi began.

NASA Discovers 715 Planets Outside Our Solar System

Not even a drop of mist in the atmosphere either.
(02-27-2014, 09:59 AM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]NASA is making official what SciFi enthusiasts have taken for granted, since...............................well, since SciFi began.

NASA Discovers 715 Planets Outside Our Solar System

That is all well and good but I just want them to give us back PLUTO!!!
I've sort of gotten used to it being gone. Actually there are some planetoids out there, which are larger than Pluto. Just one of those mistakes made in the early days of astronomy, I guess.
(02-27-2014, 10:13 AM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]I've sort of gotten used to it being gone.

I'm staying old school. S28

Our Solar System - Fun with NASA! - YouTube
And I thought I was Reactionary. S13
(02-16-2014, 11:15 PM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-16-2014, 10:56 PM)Grizzly Wrote: [ -> ]Asteroid passing by on Monday.

Huge Asteroid to Fly Safely By Earth Monday: Watch It Live

I was going through the list of NEOs, over at SpaceWeather.com, earlier, and I noted that there was a few pretty big ones whizzing by. The one you mention is 195 metres, but 8.8 LDs away.

But what your article left out is the fact that on the 10th of February, just six days ago, we had an even larger asteroid shoot by, and even closer. It was 2006 DP 14, some 730 metres, and 6.2 LDs. The link above states that it was estimated size of 460 m - 1.0 km, but NASA was a bit more specific. Now that one was really big. If we had that one slam into us, you can forget about politics for about a millennium or more. S5

Oh, and there are a couple more, within the next month, which are over 200 metres, and within 8 LDs. Hell, its a virtual shooting gallery out there, and far more important than all that AGW crap. We really do need to get our priorities straight.

Yeah, and while all of us(myself included) were all wound up and up at un-godly hours of the morning listening to the deep space probe tracking and various NASA and other govt. space agency tracking of that broken up something - from the opposite direction without any warning a freaking meteor rains down on Russia with such force that it actually registered as a possible nuclear explosion.

WE DON'T KNOW CRAP!

Heck! What I don't know and what everybody else doesn't know can fill freakin' libraries. I think we need to build more libraries...
(02-27-2014, 10:07 AM)Paul In Sweden Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-27-2014, 09:59 AM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]NASA is making official what SciFi enthusiasts have taken for granted, since...............................well, since SciFi began.

NASA Discovers 715 Planets Outside Our Solar System

That is all well and good but I just want them to give us back PLUTO!!!

Somebody should arrest those dognappers!

Of course, Pluto is smaller than many moons are (only one third the mass of earth's moon), and its irregular orbit takes it inside the orbit of Neptune periodically. Pluto and its largest satellite, Charon, are actually regarded as a binary system, since they both orbit a center of gravity (barycenter) exterior to both of them. In addition to Charon, there are four more known satellites of Pluto: Nix, Hydra, Kerberos, and Styx. Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluto

Pluto
[attachment=157]
Great time lapse photography of the heavens, mostly of the stars, with the exception of the start and finish. This looks best in HD full screen mode. S22

[Image: 8752571500_1917d050fe.jpg]

[Image: 11661682215_ccf7d58752.jpg]

Brian Randolph Greene is an American theoretical physicist and string theorist. He has been a professor at Columbia University since 1996 and chairman of the World Science Festival since co-founding it in 2008.

Now for the news that he has just posted on his Facebook page:

Hi Everyone,

A quick heads up regarding some potentially exciting news:

There will be an announcement tomorrow of a "major discovery" and many think it will be the very first evidence pointing toward "primordial gravitational waves" -- loosely speaking, these would be ripples in the fabric of spacetime coming from the big bang.

As of now, this is unconfirmed speculation, but there's strong reason to believe that's what will be announced.

If true, it is a big deal.

Stay tuned.

-BG

Shock
(03-16-2014, 07:29 PM)Grizzly Wrote: [ -> ]A quick heads up regarding some potentially exciting news:

There will be an announcement tomorrow of a "major discovery" and many think it will be the very first evidence pointing toward "primordial gravitational waves" -- loosely speaking, these would be ripples in the fabric of spacetime coming from the big bang.

Here is a second confirmation:

Luboš Motl March 16, 2014 Wrote:Rumor: inflation-related primordial B-modes to be announced on Monday
BICEP2 near the South Pole might have found a gem


In the morning, Sam Telfer asked Matt Strassler, Adam Falkowski, and myself about the new buzz related to the B-modes. It turns out that he was ahead of us. But now, all of us know what is supposed to happen soon, and it is exciting.

The rumor is all about BICEP2, a small experiment at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in the Antarctica (BICEP1 concluded with this paper; see also BICEP2 status in 2012). Focusing on the frequency \(150\, {\rm GHz}\) i.e. wavelength 2 millimeters, it is trying to find the primordial B-modes, something that could be important to pick the winners among theories of cosmic inflation and possible alternative theories to cosmic inflation.

What are the B-modes? They are one of the two components of anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background that may be separated by the Helmholtz decomposition (or its generalization for the celestial sphere).
This from Brian Greene's Facebook Page: (Update)

Hi Everyone,

Exciting news—the rumors have proved to be correct.

Here is a quick summary of what the excitement is all about:

The dominant scientific approach to cosmology, called the 'inflationary theory,' predicts that that just after the birth of the universe, space experienced a tremendous burst of expansion, causing it to swell from far smaller than the size of an atom to perhaps even farther than we can now see with our most powerful telescopes, all within a minuscule fraction of a second.

Tiny variations in the original space would have been stretched out in the expansion—and much as a pulled piece of spandex reveals the pattern of its weave, these stretched “quantum jitters” would be imprinted on the residual heat from the universe's earliest moments, and would be detectable as a pattern of subtle temperature variations in the night sky. We’ve been finding and mapping these variations—a specific pattern of hot and cold spots in the cosmic microwave background radiation -- with ever-greater precision since the early 1990s, a triumph of modern cosmology.

Today, researchers at Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, leading a team of researchers using a facility at the South Pole, say they’ve found, for the first time, a long-predicted second kind of fluctuation: ripples in the fabric of space itself, set down in the universe’s earliest moments. Believed also to be generated by quantum processes, these spatial vibrations are inferred from a delicate twist they impart to the cosmic background radiation.

If the results stand, they are a landmark discovery. They provide our first look into energy scales that are perhaps a million million times larger than that of the Large Hadron Collider, and will greatly sharpen our theoretical understanding of events that happened perhaps a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. The results also affirm, once again, the astounding power of mathematical analysis to lead the way into the most remote corners of creation.

--BG
That theory is interesting, because it violates so much settled thought. The math is said to work out, but I find it hard to explain the space-time conflicts. According to what was printed as further explanation, these researchers said a very tiny existence almost instantly expanded into the entire universe as we know it. That being the case, why would there be momentum and inertia involved at all after the fact? Why continually expand for millions of years, afterwards, if the initial event was at the speed of instantaneous existence? What drag would there be to cause such a speed to be reduced to measurable limits?

I understand Einstein's General theory based on the Universal Constant: the speed of light. Either it is a constant or it is not. The variations in time and space measurements have always been interrelated. String theory has been in vogue for a generation, now, but it seems a case of one or the other. I worked through the Lorentz Contractions backed up with real world tests to prove how Einstein's terms cancel out to yield E=MC-squared. Everything else just seems so ...messy.
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