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Full Version: Insulin may slow Alzheimer's................
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According to a recent study. Doctors seem to be pretty excited by this study, even though it only used 104 subjects in the study.

Quote:Inhaling a concentrated cloud of insulin through the nose twice a day appears to slow — and in some cases reverse — symptoms of memory loss in people with early signs of Alzheimer's disease, a new pilot study has found.

The study involved only 104 people and is considered very preliminary. But it suggests that a safe, simple and cheap measure that boosts flagging metabolism in key areas of the brain could hold off or possibly derail the progression of the devastating neurological disorder in its early stages. The results were published online Monday by the journal Archives of Neurology.

Insulin is a metabolic hormone best known for its role in treating diabetes, a condition in which the hormone is either insufficiently produced or poorly used by the body's organs. But in recent years, studies have found that people with diabetes and prediabetes are at heightened risk of developing Alzheimer's, and autopsies have shown that diabetics whose condition was tightly managed had fewer of the brain tangles and plaques that are the hallmark of disease. Studies involving animals have suggested that insulin deficiency in the brain may be a key factor in the progression of Alzheimer's.

Researchers from the Veterans Administration's Puget Sound Health Care System in Washington state decided to test insulin on people without diabetes who had been diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer's or amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a disorder characterized by increased forgetfulness that often progresses to dementia. Study participants were divided into three groups: 36 of them inhaled 20 milligrams of insulin twice a day for four months, 38 got 40 mg twice a day, and 30 were given a saline solution.

After two months of treatment, those treated with 20 mg of insulin had improved performance on a memory test. The gains persisted after four months of treatment and were still evident two months after the insulin treatment stopped.

Patients who got the higher dose of insulin had no change in their memory abilities, while those who got the placebo saw a decline. The differences between those on insulin and those on the placebo were "small in absolute terms," the authors wrote. But they were robust enough that by generally accepted research standards, they are unlikely to have been the result of chance.

Subjects taking either dose of insulin were rated by their caregivers as holding steady in their overall social, mental and everyday functioning, while those on the sham medication were rated as having declined. And on physician-administered tests of cognitive function, subjects taking insulin showed less decline than those on the placebo.
This could help many people, if true. Should I buy insulin manufacturers stock today or wait?