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Noticed in photo # 3 something WEIRD here. Which makes me question the "uncontacted" idea:


http://www.livescience.com/15459-gallery...dians.html
You mean the black native in the center?
Yes. I don't think black folks are native to Brazil. Are they? I admit I am ignorant of racial mixes ,etc???
(08-09-2011, 02:25 PM)Palladin Wrote: [ -> ]Yes. I don't think black folks are native to Brazil. Are they? I admit I am ignorant of racial mixes ,etc???

They are not. However, the person could have been adopted earlier.

But that would leave them no longer untouched, right?



Also, I thought one of the natives in the first picture might be wearing a coloured shirt, which had to be made outside the tribe. Did you think it might be a shirt too?
Or he painted himself black, like how the other guys are painted an ocher color. Just throwing that out there.

I read about this some time ago and it's sorely tempting to fly in on a small bush plane and proclaim myself a God.
Tait,

You might need to be a god to find them according to the article. They may all be dead after a bunch of drug gangsters came for a visit.
I didn't know there was still a jungle in Brazil. Maybe those who re-introduced "uncontacted tribes" put an African there by mistake, or simply because they were short of other specimens.
(08-22-2011, 07:42 AM)Fredledingue Wrote: [ -> ]I didn't know there was still a jungle in Brazil. Maybe those who re-introduced "uncontacted tribes" put an African there by mistake, or simply because they were short of other specimens.

You're kidding, right?

Jungles grow back very, very, quickly, and the Eco-Wackos are not going to tell you that.

Most probably after the contact they will die of a desease you are immune to but they aren't. It happened in Siberia about 40 years ago when a family was found. They escaped to the forest after Revolution and were found in Perestroika. A whole large family died but one.
JOhnL, more seriousely I'm VERY surprised that there are still uncontacted tribes in South America with all the deforestation (that you deny of course).

Green, a few years ago I read that somewhere north of St Petersburg they found a village of white russians still living like in the Middle Age without any contact with the civilized world and without any tool, clothes or other items not produced by them.
It was interresting because they were not ethnic eskimos or laponians, they were white europeans.

When asked if they wished to live like modern poeple, they said "no way".

I don't know if they are still alive today.
(08-22-2011, 03:09 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: [ -> ]JOhnL, more seriousely I'm VERY surprised that there are still uncontacted tribes in South America with all the deforestation (that you deny of course).

Fred, a lot of the jungle was cut down, in order to make way for farming. That is true. But the soil is not rich, and farmers quickly moved on.

But the jungle has been reclaiming itself far quicker than thought. Patrick Moore did a study on that very thing. I'd have to look it up, but the gist of the story is that there really isn't all this vast, destroyed jungle. It grows back very quickly.

New Jungles Prompt a Debate on Rain Forests. And note the description used in the article: the "galloping jungle".

Amazon deforestation in 2009 declines to lowest on record

Tear down the Amazon rainforest idol

The Amazing Amazon Rainforest
I have messed up, sorry.
It was the family of Lykovs, Old Believers, they went to Khakassia, a Siberian province in 1930s and were discovered in 1978 by geologists.
Wikipedia (ru, fr, de) Five among the family of six died of pneumonia or lack of immunity. The blood analysis revealed absense of antibodies to the majority of viruses. The youngest daughter Agafia still lives there.
More on uncontacted tribes of the Amazonian.
They mysteriousely killed the only guy who understood their dialect...

IMO most of these so called uncontacted tribes have been in contact, at least by one or two persons like this one.
And most of them have already seen cars from afar, and hold in their hand industrialy produced items.

As population not recorded in the census, the word "isolated" would be more accurate than "uncontacted".
Body paint is not novel; uncontacted is a momentary perception not a fact with respect to historical Time; and, above all else, these isolates are the convenient pawns of environmentalists and their agitprop. Now as to the word "tribe"...

http://news.mongabay.com/2007/0604-indians.html

Brazil and FUNAI have become the favored whipping boys of the Eco-whackos so one can guess they'll be discovering "new tribes" on a regular basis depending upon the fund-raising campaigns of the given moments.

Care to try for Papua?
No, they hunt heads there, and it's somewhat embarrassing to use people who are adherents of cargo cults as fundraiser poster-children. It doesn't say much about how intelligent and in tune they are with the Earth, understanding it, when there is a straw airplane in the background worshiped as a God.
The Amazonian jungles of Brazil (and extending into Colombia) are enormous, and some of its deepest parts are very hard to reach. We are talking about a rain forest along the equator, where it is hot and humid and bug- and beast-infested. Scientists do believe there are some tribes in there--miles away from the Amazon River itself--that have never been contacted by the outside world.
Please define outside world. Because I'm sure most of them have been in contact with someone who has been in contact with the civilized world.
Uncontacted by my definition would be poeple who don't know that we exist as a modern civilisation. Poeple who don't know that somewhere there are poeple wearing T-shirts and driving cars. I guess most of the jungle poeple know that fact at present.

That they decided to stay in the jungle and live by their own, without commercing with the industrial world doesn't mean nobody has ever talked to them or that they never saw poeple like us.
(08-22-2011, 04:03 PM)John L Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-22-2011, 03:09 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: [ -> ]JOhnL, more seriousely I'm VERY surprised that there are still uncontacted tribes in South America with all the deforestation (that you deny of course).

Fred, a lot of the jungle was cut down, in order to make way for farming. That is true. But the soil is not rich, and farmers quickly moved on.

But the jungle has been reclaiming itself far quicker than thought. Patrick Moore did a study on that very thing. I'd have to look it up, but the gist of the story is that there really isn't all this vast, destroyed jungle. It grows back very quickly.

New Jungles Prompt a Debate on Rain Forests. And note the description used in the article: the "galloping jungle".

Amazon deforestation in 2009 declines to lowest on record

Tear down the Amazon rainforest idol

The Amazing Amazon Rainforest

Something will grow back rapidly, that's true. Not however lost species of plants and wildlife. These jungles don't have the diversity of the old ones, nothing the profit-wackos would tell you.
(02-03-2012, 11:56 AM)quadrat Wrote: [ -> ]Something will grow back rapidly, that's true. Not however lost species of plants and wildlife. These jungles don't have the diversity of the old ones, nothing the profit-wackos would tell you.

Bullshit!! clear cutting promotes greater diversity, not less. And as the forests returns, different species move out, and many in, to the news niche. Its how forests, and other species promote sound populations, which are greater than if the forests never had to begin the cycle over again.

Patrick Moore, of Greenspirit, has spent a lot of time studying how clear cuts have had positive effects in the North American northwest. Here are some of the pictures and his comments.

[Image: prettyclearcut.jpg]
Taken in the right light, even clearcuts can be beautiful. On the western slopes of the Cariboo Mountains, logging has resulted in a temporary removal of forest over some areas. This allows the sunlight to reach directly to the ground, thus promoting the growth of species that cannot live under the shade of trees.

[Image: fireweed.jpg]
High in the Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia, this area was clearcut four years before the photo was taken. Immediately after the trees were felled and harvested the clearcut looked ugly, dead and wasted. Four seasons later it looks beautiful as the fireweed has come in from seeds floating on the wind. Ecological health cannot be determined just by judging the aesthetics of a particular landscape at a point in time.

[Image: 6.jpg]
The above photo is of a monoculture Douglas-fir forest in the Koksilah River watershed on Vancouver Island; but nobody planted anything there. This is a naturally-regenerated forest growing back from logging 65 years ago. It has only one dominant tree species but it is rich in other species of plants, animals, birds and insects.

[Image: 7.jpg]
This area at Winter Harbour on northern Vancouver Island was clearcut logged by my grandfather in 1939. It has grown back by natural regeneration with no planting or tending. Today it is inhabited by bears, cougar, wolves, deer, eagles, owls, ravens, and all the other species that were present here before the forest was first cut.

[Image: 8.jpg]
Even fifteen years after harvesting, this clearcut area in central British Columbia is still meadow-like because the sunlight reaches directly to the ground. As the new trees grow taller and shade out the ground, the beautiful flowers and shrubs will die.

[Image: 9.jpg]
A Boletus mushroom has found a home in Pacific Spirit Park. This area was completely cleared by logging and has now recovered to such an extent that part of it has been designated as an Ecological Reserve.

[Image: 10.jpg]
The interior of a closed canopy forest is shaded from direct sun, protected from frost, and sheltered from wind. This, in combination with the living bodies of the trees, creates an entirely new environment with opportunities for thousands of new species to evolve; species that could not exist in the absence of the trees.

[Image: 11.jpg]
A 35 year-old forest growing back in a clearcut in Clayoquot Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Amid accusations of "ecological collapse" and "species extinction" the forest quietly returns, providing a home for all who dwell there.

[Image: 12.jpg]
It is hard to believe that this area was clearcut logged less than 100 years ago, but it is typical of the rate of forest renewal in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. Nothing was planted after the logging. The forest just grew back by itself in the same way it has done countles times in the past after destruction by fire, volcanoes and ice-ages.

Biodiversity In a Clearcut?...

Mount St. Helen cleared a forest far more efficiently than any "logger" and guess what...here's an observation now 20 years old:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1..._10555214/

Now, when eco-nuts start yammering about the Amazonian rain forest, it is obvious that they wish one to imagine vast, flat, woodlands with impenetrable growth that actually contradicts the ecological realities of the Amazonian basin. There's nary a tree on the Pantanal and there is as much acreage underwater parts of the year as there is forest canopy, but that's neither here nor there in the effort to declare pristine regions that have been criscrossed through the centuries by the venturesome. We will not even go into the fallacious contention that "old growth forests" are "carbon sinks", when in truth they are producers of CO2 once the trees reach maturity. So the argument now goes that to create true "carbon sinks" one must scientifically remove old growth...ho hum it's OK is the scientists do it but heaven help any logger that pursues such an enterprise.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...085542.htm

As for the purported "uncontacted"...we are discussing Peru and its Brazilian borderland and a little detail is forgotten:

The hype:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/20...razil-peru

http://www.geekologie.com/2008/06/fake-u...-tribe.php

The "correction" so as to continue the agitprop:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...rests.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-gran...72910.html



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