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Full Version: Major Earthquake in Japan
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i'm glued to the telly, japanese tv broadcasts live pictures from the tsunami. jesus, everything swept away by a wave of trash. the chopper follows the wave over fields and twons and roads, first normally moving traffic, then they see the wave coming and try to escape. oh my.
Fox news has on live video from a helicopter as the wave comes in.
Amazing. It just keep coming and coming. A big blob of water, mud, and debris.
My uncle lives in Wakayama, Japan. Its on the eastern side of the islands so i hope he's okay. I haven't been able to raise him but he may just be without power. I can't believe the magnitude of this thing!
Hey, I used to post here a long, long, time ago. Thought I'd check in and see what this forum is thinking. I've been all over the Internet to try and see what the public perception is.


I live and work in Japan. I was on my way to work when the quake hit, it was huge. Nothing like I've ever felt. As of now our big problem is with the nuclear reactors, but from what I've been hearing on the news here, They should be fine. They've evacuated about 200,000 people from the area surrounding it.

Also Ghoullio, your uncle should be fine. They evacuated about 20,000 people so that's probably why you haven't been able to reach him. As far as I know, Wakayama was not hit hard and the evacuations happened after a tsunami warning, which has since been partially lifted.

If anyone has any questions about the quake or how we're dealing with it here I'd be happy to answer.
Hi Mike. Believe it or not, I was thinking about you the other day, wondering where you had gotten to.

Anyway, stick around and keep us informed on what is happening there in Japan, ok? I used to live in Osaka many decades ago.
We were able to arch my uncle on Facebook this weekend. I didn't update because I had forgotten about this thread. he and his family are fine, he teaches English in his prefecture. His wife's family however live closer to the damage zone and they are having a hard time locating all of them.
It doesn't look good S4
Anonymous24 Wrote:It doesn't look good S4

The nuclear aspect of the disaster is grossly overstated. It is the OTHER stuff that doesn't look good.
John L Wrote:
Anonymous24 Wrote:It doesn't look good S4

The nuclear aspect of the disaster is grossly overstated. It is the OTHER stuff that doesn't look good.

Yes. There are tons of people here I know just picking up and driving west. My mom wants me to pick up and go back to Canada.

The radiation is not enough to harm people outside the already evacuated area according to every source I've seen.
John L Wrote:
Anonymous24 Wrote:It doesn't look good S4

The nuclear aspect of the disaster is grossly overstated. It is the OTHER stuff that doesn't look good.

Hopefully. Here is what Stratfor has to say:

Quote:The nuclear reactor situation in Japan has deteriorated significantly. Two more explosions occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 15.

The first occurred at 6:10 a.m. local time at reactor No. 2, which had seen nuclear fuel rods exposed for several hours after dropping water levels due to mishaps in the emergency cooling efforts. Within three hours the amount of radiation at the plant rose to 163 times the previously recorded level, according to Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

Elsewhere, radiation levels were said to have reached 400 times the “annual legal limit” at reactor No. 3. Authorities differed on whether the reactor pressure vessel at reactor No. 2 was damaged after the explosion, but said the reactor’s pressure-suppression system may have been damaged possibly allowing a radiation leak. After this, a fire erupted at reactor No. 4 and was subsequently extinguished, according to Kyodo. Kyodo also reported the government has ordered a no-fly zone 30 kilometers around the reactor, and Prime Minister Naoto Kan has expanded to 30 kilometers the range within which citizens should remain indoors and warned that further leaks are possible.



(click here to enlarge image)
Reports from Japanese media currently tell of rising radiation levels in the areas south and southwest of the troubled plant due to a change in wind direction toward the southwest. Ibaraki prefecture, immediately south of Fukushima, was reported to have higher than normal levels. Chiba prefecture, to the east of Tokyo and connected to the metropolitan area, saw levels reportedly two to four times above the “normal” level. Utsunomiya, Tochigi prefecture, north of Tokyo, reported radiation at 33 times the normal level measured there. Kanagawa prefecture, south of Tokyo, reported radiation at up to nine times the normal level. Finally, a higher than normal amount was reported in Tokyo. The government says radiation levels have reached levels hazardous to human health. Wind direction, temperature, and topography all play a crucial factor in the spread of radioactive materials as well as their diffusion, and wind direction is not easily predictable and constantly shifting, with reports saying it could shift west and then back eastward to sea within the next day. It is impossible to know how reliable these preliminary readings are but they suggest a dramatic worsening as well as a wider spread than at any time since the emergency began.

The Japanese government has announced a 30-kilometer no-fly zone and is expanding evacuation zones and urging the public within a wider area to remain indoors. The situation at the nuclear facility is uncertain, but clearly deteriorating. Currently, the radiation levels do not appear immediately life-threatening outside the 20-kilometer evacuation zone. But if there is a steady northerly wind, the potential for larger-scale evacuations of more populated areas may become a reality. This would present major challenges to the Japanese government. Further, the potential for panic-induced individual evacuations could trigger even greater problems for the government to manage.
Just to let everyone know, I'm leaving the Tokyo area for the next 5 days. My school is closed anyway and it's better to be safe than sorry. It's not an expensive trip, so there's no reason not to go.
StereoMike Wrote:Just to let everyone know, I'm leaving the Tokyo area for the next 5 days. My school is closed anyway and it's better to be safe than sorry. It's not an expensive trip, so there's no reason not to go.

Don't forget to give us a 'blow-by-blow' account on what happens, ok?
Bear in mind these explosions are not "nuclear" explosions. They're not good,but,they are overpressure problems caused I think by rapid increases in hydrogen.

Some contamination is outside containment at one reactor,but,the levels aren't much. Unless you are close,it will be about like 3 mile island's mess up.

More bad pr than serious health issues. Way more men died in coal mining accidents last month than will from this,just keep that in mind.
Turkish media is commenting that Japan is hit with disasters, but the order in the country is not affected.

We have to admire the Japanese people; they will endure these disasters and economically will come out better than before.
Yea,no thieves,no rioting.

My brother has done business in Japan and he told me years ago the Japanese are the most honorable people he's ever dealt with.

If they give you their word,they will stand by it.
I noticed something telling in one of the Japanese news briefs. The person giving the briefing approached the podium, then stopped and bowed to the flag. Can you imagine any of our officials doing something like that?
Sure, if/when we change our flag to the flag of China or Venezuela...
You're saying respect for the flag is only practiced in dictatorships?
OMG, you are a humorless dick! Jesus, dude, relax! It's only the internet!
If that's humor, allow me to suggest you take lessons. You ain't very good at it...
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