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Where is everyone from?
#1
Anyway, I thought I would make a post here to start this new forum up.

As for the answer to my own question, I grew up in South Jersey, bout 20 minutes from Philadelphia. I go to school in Upstate New York, in the Rochester area.

What about you guys?
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#2
Born on Fort Jackson, SC. Army brat. Lived all over the world, but spent more time in Alaska than anywhere else, other than my time as an adult in Knoxville, TN. Parents still living in Columbia, SC, near where they were born and raised.

I consider myself the consumate Southerner.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#3
Born In New York City. I've been to catholic school (I'm not catholic anymore),been to other religious private schools and finished in public school. I traveled to Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Conneticut. I used to frequently visit my grandparents in their homeland as a child. Probably go do that next year.

There are many countries I would like to go to. Britain, China, Russia, Canada, Israel and the People's Republic of Vermont. :lol: I'll document my travels for you guys. S2

Oh no anon is near me. Shock :lol:
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#4
You should check each other out.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
John L Wrote:You should check each other out.

[Image: duel.gif]
Sodomia delenda est

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#6
Born in Missoula, Montana. Pretty much raised here in Montana.

So far the Army has taken me to Fort Jackson, SC, and back and then to Colorado soon, even though I been through most of the Western US already.
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#7
Born in Chicago and raised in the next county, a Republican stronghold. Joined the USAF and served in south Texas. Moved around Texas and Oklahoma City. Finally moved to southernmost Mexico, then southmost Texas, then northern Thailand.
I'm often wrong. But I'm not always wrong!
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#8
Fit what language do they speak in Thailand?
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#9
Born in Leidschendam, but I never lived there. I spent two years in The Hague, six in Dieren (100 meters from the Veluwe) and nine in Assen. I moved to Tilburg almost two years ago to attend the university there.

I also got some sort of connection to Columbia, SC: in my university's program to study abroad for a semester I filed for a business school there. I met the requirements (grades, etc.) easily and my motivation letter was "very good" according to the persons that reviewed my application, but they told me afterward that this particular exchange was for master students only and so I was not eligible. It would have been great though. :lol:
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#10
Don't quit, do everything you need to in order to achieve all of your educational goals.
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#11
Independents4Bush Wrote:Fit what language do they speak in Thailand?
They speak Thai, which has tones, entirely different grammar, and its own alphabet. I learned Spanish just fine, 8 year ago, but I can't learn Thai.
I'm often wrong. But I'm not always wrong!
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#12
What do you mean you can't learn thai? It might take you years but I'm sure you can learn it. Whether its worth the investment in time, effort and the stress, is the real question.
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#13
Independents4Bush Wrote:What do you mean you can't learn Thai? It might take you years but I'm sure you can learn it. Whether its worth the investment in time, effort and the stress, is the real question.
Of course, immigrants should learn the local language, if they can. I can't; it's too involved to discuss in this thread. I arrived in Thailand at a much more advanced age than Senora Flores (my grandchildren's Mexican great grandmother) arrived in Texas, and I doubt I'll learn it. But, if I made babies in my adopted country, as Sra. Flores did, they'd learn the local language.
I'm often wrong. But I'm not always wrong!
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#14
I was coming from a career angle. If it were beneficial you should. Don't know if you're retired yet. If you ever set up a small business in Thailand it would help. If you ever did work for the state department that would come in handy.
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#15
Learning a language is something that you have pivot the entire focus of your life towards.
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#16
Anonymous24 Wrote:Learning a language is something that you have pivot the entire focus of your life towards.

Not really. Language learning skills deteriorate rapidly with age. The main exception I know of are the people who are fluent in 5+ languages by say the age of 25, these can go on learning more.

So if you are interested in learning languages, do not delay. S1
Sodomia delenda est

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#17
Oh, maybe that statement just applies to me, then S6

(I struggled with Spanish I last semester).
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#18
A young immigrant, settling in a country that doesn't speak his native tongue, has to learn the local language to survive, work, etc. I came to Thailand at age 60. I chose to work as an English teacher, which can be done with no knowledge of the local language. I lived in places full of English speakers, and have a partner who can take care of the Thai-only situations. Besides, I seem to be tone deaf. "Maa" means horse, dog, and mother, with different tones. You don't want to call somebody's mother a dog. S4
I'm often wrong. But I'm not always wrong!
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#19
Fit2BThaied Wrote:Besides, I seem to be tone deaf. "Maa" means horse, dog, and mother, with different tones. You don't want to call somebody's mother a dog. S4

He-heh. So Thai is like this too. Being tone-deaf is what killed my attempt to learn Chinese. :oops:
Sodomia delenda est

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#20
Just how many languages do you know?(and what is your native language, if you don't mind my asking)
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