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Fantastic Beasts, etc. movie
#1
Well, some of my acquaintances said the movie was OK, so I decided to splurge. I went to see MJR's "Epic Experience" (their largest screen, said to be "eight stories wide by four stories high," but that is an exaggeration) plus Dolby sound plus "Real D" 3D. It cost $9.50. I could have skipped all the extras and gone to see the basic movie before noon for only $5.50. But I go to the theater so seldom, I figured I might as well go for the whole thing.

The movie was OK. But even though I had already read the screenplay (available from the public library in hardback book form), it was at times a little hard to follow the story line. Let's say the frenetic action could be near chaotic, and there was lots of it. There was great attention to detail, evident in the expressions on the faces of even the littlest creatures flying in an explosion of creatures, so it might be worthwhile to see the movie again. And the characters were likeable (though none were as sympathetic as the kids we watched growing up in the original eight Harry Potter movies). To me it seemed the story was a little too compressed, like they were trying to get too much in, to allow for virtually nonstop special effects. They seem to be making a fair amount of money so far. We'll see if they reach the billion-dollar range, that many people expect. We'll also see if they can justify making five movies in the series (set some 80 years before Harry Potter), which is what they have planned. According to Wikipedia, the movie so far "has grossed $607.9 million worldwide, making it the tenth highest-grossing film of 2016." It is reported their budget was $180 million, so they seem to have succeeded financially.
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#2
I forgot to mention, though probably everyone knows by now, this movie is set in America--in NYC. It begins with Newt Scamander getting off the ship from England, and ends with him boarding the ship to England. During the movie it is revealed that there is a "school of witchcraft and wizardry" in America. Some Americans say it is the greatest in the world. Newt says Hogwarts is. And someone replies, "Hogwash." (I always wondered how hogs got into it in the first place. They're not magical creatures. Not to mention the warts.) Maybe if I frequented the Pottermore website, I would have learned the answer to that.
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#3
Does this mean that I am a "No-one"? Shock
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#4
If you're referring to the American wizards' term for non-magical people, they call them "No-Maj." That is the equivalent of the British term, "Muggles."
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#5
(12-06-2016, 03:05 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: If you're referring to the American wizards' term for non-magical people, they call them "No-Maj." That is the equivalent of the British term, "Muggles."

No, actually I was referring to your statement that "Everyone knows".   However, I don't know a thing about this , so that must make me a "No One", right?  S13

Don't mind me Ron, I'm just an old foggy.  I'll get over it.  S22
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#6
No John, you're not the only one who wouldn't know that Rowling set this novel and film in the United States. There is a guy in Croatia who doesn't know, and he isn't no one, either. However, he did know why Bones, in her Wonder Women Halloween costume spun around at the end of one episode. We all know certain stuff about certain things, and don't know other stuff. Erasmus was the last intellectual who was said to know everything.

It's good to know esoteric stuff. You, for instance, could go on the $64 Thousand Dollar quiz show and clean up on things like your music collections, Founder's philosophers, or wood-working tools. Jack Benny went on that show, under the category of violins. He won his first question, made $64 dollars and refused to go any farther because he wouldn't put that $64 at jeopardy. John Ratzenberger played Cliff Clavin on "Cheers", and on that show his character knew esoteric trivia, went on "Jeopardy' and answered every question to end the show with the highest total ever - and then lost it all when the Final Jeopardy answer was, "Marion Mitchell Morrison" and a couple other real names of celebrity actors. Cliffy bet the whole thing and said, "Who was never in my kitchen?"

Knowing stuff is good - even when you can't explain just why.
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#7
"Everyone" probably does not include people who are not Harry Potter fans. Those who have seen the Harry Potter movies know they were all set in England. So it was big news in their universe when the new movie showed the magical wizarding world in America. Sorry for the inferrable slight. S5
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#8
(12-08-2016, 11:17 AM)Ron Lambert Wrote: "Everyone" probably does not include people who are not Harry Potter fans. Those who have seen the Harry Potter movies know they were all set in England. So it was big news in their universe when the new movie showed the magical wizarding world in America. Sorry for the inferrable slight. S5

I was just trying to poke fun at you Ron, because you were trying to pull a "Palladin" on us with that "Everyone" thing. S13
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#9
I did say "probably." S1
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