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How do you call this tool and action in english
#1
How do you call this tool and this action in english?
This thing to carve grooves and shapes on wood or other material?

[Image: pict1-10.jpg]

[Image: 2016510.jpg]

[Image: 00311580_moulure_large_main_courante_m1.jpg]
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#2
I believe that "wood" be a router.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#3
I think you are asking about CNC machines that can automatically route out complex shapes.

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#4
(10-27-2016, 04:40 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: How What do you call this tool and this action in english?

Fred, the correct word is "what", not "how".  How is related to action, and What to subject/title  S22


(10-27-2016, 04:40 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: This thing to carve grooves and shapes on wood or other material?

Its called a "router", as in "routing out grooves and channels".  


[Image: pict1-10.jpg]
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
A router?! Why (or "how" if you prefer) do you call a logical data transmiter by the same name? S5

JL Wrote:Fred, the correct word is "what", not "how". How is related to action, and What to subject/title
Isn't "calling" an action?
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#6
(11-03-2016, 11:52 AM)Fredledingue Wrote: A router?! Why (or "how" if you prefer) do you call a logical data transmiter by the same name? S5

JL Wrote:Fred, the correct word is "what", not "how".  How is related to action, and What to subject/title
Isn't "calling" an action?

Fred, sometimes a word can be a verb and also a noun, at the same time.  Its proper name is a "router"(noun), because it routes(verb) out patterns in wood.  

[Image: makitarouter1.jpg]

But this will also be confusing.  There is more than one type of router.  Here's another "router"

[Image: Switch-or-Router-4.gif]

It is also a router, because it routes internet signals to more than one piece of equipment.



Consequently one is a woodworking "Router", and the other is a "Signal" router.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#7
Do you use hqnd-held woodworking "Router" often? Or do you have something more advanced?
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#8
There are lots of Youtube router videos, here's one for beginners. 



'It's not who votes that matters, it's who counts the votes'  |  György Schwartz, Budapest, Hungary
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#9
(11-04-2016, 10:23 AM)Fredledingue Wrote: Do you use hqnd-held woodworking "Router" often? Or do you have something more advanced?

I have not used a hand held for a while now.  But I have one installed under my table saw wing, and use it as a router table.  I have used it several times in the last year.   Actually, I have three routers, one set up with a circle cutting jug attached.

The router is a very useful tool and that's why I have three of them.  S22

My router table is something like this. Only difference is that both the table saw and the router, are hooked up to my shop vac.

[Image: DSCF3139.jpg]
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
I see. I have one hand held router too, I use it form time to time for not important stuffs. I can't do important stuffs with wood. I'm not precise with wood work. I feel better with metal works.
I hate this tool because it's terribly noisy, fast, very difficult to control by hand, even with rulers. But I like what we can do with it.

Google translate gave me "milling" as translation which is obviousely wrong. That's why I was asking. I suggested router as better translation now.

https://translate.google.lt/?ie=UTF-8&hl.../fraiseuse
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#11
Hey Fred, here's some of my shop tools.  

This is my air compressor, with my battery powered lawn mower folded up next to it.  All of my 4X8 sheets of plywood and OSB sit right in front of the compressor, hiding it.  So when it cranks up, it has a built in muffler, and the noise is very muffled.

[Image: IMAG0216_zpsoxpza8kv.jpg]

Here's my table saw, with my old dust collection system hooked up to the top and underneath the saw.  I've since replaced it with a totally dust free system that incorporates a Thien Collector and outside duct for the microscopic dust that the filter doesn't catch.

[Image: IMAG0214_zps9xvmjqi3.jpg]

As you can see, my router table is on the right hand extension of the saw. The rip fence acts as the anchor for my router assembly rip guide and dust port. I have a old 1 hp B&D router permanently mounted underneath it. I never remove it because I have two more that I can use freehand.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#12
This is my new Thien Collector system.

[Image: IMAG0365_zpszrtvo7fj.jpg]


All the hoses are 4"(10cm), from the bottom of the table saw, up into the collector, and out the top into the vacuum motor, where the air is vented outside the house.  Its very, very efficient, and that work area to the left of the table saw, is almost totally dust free.  None of the sawdust, even the tiniest particles make it into the basement, or upstairs.   Everything from one micron and larger is spun out and drops into the Thien collector.  Anything smaller than one micron is sent outside, through a vent, shown here.

[Image: IMAG0366_zpsqulsevvj.jpg]

I've had my friend Michael use the table saw, ripping plywood, while I checked out the outside vent, and all I saw was dust free air coming out.  I'm sure there were very tiny particles coming out, but I couldn't see any of it collecting on a piece of paper or my hand.  

That flexible air duct is highly flexible and I had to use a needle and thread in order to keep it from expanding and contracting so much. The two hp motor has so much suction that if I hadn't tightened it up, it would have pulled itself apart. you would not believe the suction this thing generates! Shock

[Image: IMAG0372_zpsh90ue2vc.jpg]
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#13
Here's my boss, Charlie, inspecting my work, and offering pointers in case I screwed up.  S22

[Image: IMAG0371_zpsnxtsprum.jpg]

That 3 in tube that goes to the rip blade guide also cleans up anything that would tend to get shot out of the blade opening.  I still got chips that kept coming out.  But I eliminated almost 100% of that by making brand new blade plates from 1/4" plywood.  Once I made the plate, I attached it to the table, and then turned on the blade.  Then I just raised the blade until it had cut into the plate as high as I needed it.  That did it; almost nothing shooting out of the blade area.  I have several of these blade plates, one for cutting at an angle, one for attachment blades, and two different openings for straight cuts.

Oh, that other branch with the plywood cover and blue painter's tape is the extra opening for my other shop tools such as my band saw, and thickness plainer. I just attach another hose to it and don't have to worry about plugging up the hose leading to the table saw. The suction is so great there's no need for it.

Incidentally, if you are not familiar with the Thien Dust Collection system, here is a Google search page for it. This is the Ultimate shop build sawdust collection out there, and it is highly flexible so as to fit it into your shop. And your wife will also love you for having one. S22

Thien Dust Collector

Harbor Freight Modifications
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#14
Here's what most of the Harbor Freight modified Thien Collectors look like.  Here's the stock HF dust collector.  I picked up mine for just a little over $100.   Its pretty much a cult classic among the serious tool users over here in the US.

[Image: 455102-438x_zpsibg7mgdy.jpg]

The collector is on the bottom, and a HEPA filter set on top to filter out the tiny particles.  But its not entirely dust proof, because it simply cannot eliminate ALL of the tiniest particles.  That's why I did away with the top filter and just vented the air outside.  I'd rather waste some warm air than have sub-micron particles floating around the house and upstairs.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#15
Great! S1
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#16
Fred, both my air compressor and table saw were converted to 220 volts before they were even a year old. I purchased them in 1981, and they have been going strong now for over 35 years now. I always tell everyone that they need to convert their power tools away from the 110 volts if they are able. By doubling the voltage, the amperage requirements is cut in half, which allows the power tool to work effortlessly. At the 110 volts, its just too much amperage required to get the same thing done.

I've only had to replace my air compressor 'on-off' switch, which shorted out. I still have the same 1-1/2 hp table saw motor. I wish it was a 3hp motor, but I'm not going to upgrade as long as the motor continues to chug along.

My dust collection system was not able to be converted, so I am having to use it at 110 volts.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#17
220Volts! You can bring your stuff overhere if you decide to move to Europe. S5
Voltage is a trade-off between efficiency and safety. The more the voltage the more dangerous it is.

Here we can get up to 4400W off the plug on standard 2.5mm² (13 AGW) wiring. With 110 volts, theoricaly you can get only half that or install wires with the double cross section.

I'm working on LED light system developement right now (and for a few years already). recently I decided to move from 12V to 24V and everything is easier sudenly.
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#18
(11-13-2016, 03:25 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: 220Volts! You can bring your stuff overhere if you decide to move to Europe. S5
Voltage is a trade-off between efficiency and safety. The more the voltage the more dangerous it is.

Here we can get up to 4400W off the plug on standard 2.5mm² (13 AGW) wiring. With 110 volts, theoricaly you can get only half that or install wires with the double cross section.

I'm working on LED light system developement right now (and for a few years already). recently I decided to move from 12V to 24V and everything is easier sudenly.

No, the amperage is different. One is 50 hertz and the other is 60 hertz if I remember correctly. The plugs are different, and I'm sure there are more differences. When Mom and Dad were stationed in Baumholder, Germany, I can remember that particular issue. Its more complicated that one would think on first sight.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#19
You'r right. The frequency (Hz) is different. It might or might not be a problem. I think motors spin slightly faster on 60Hz than 50Hz. Sensitive electronic components may not work properly on different frequencies. But I never studied the question.

The plugs are almost the same all across continental Europe (I don't remember what's in UK), qnd so is voltage even in the former communist states, which may look surprising. I guess this norm dates back prior to WW2. The power lines pins are the same but the ground pin or connector have different shapes, sometimes quite exotics and either prevent plugging or fail to connect to ground.

Amperage is not an issue. It's up to how much your power company lets you get. On your side the amperage depends on the cross section of your wires. The amperage of your circuit breaker must be equal or lower than what the cross section of your wire allows in all safety.
If you connect a device which is taking too many amperes you will either trigger the circuit breaker or melt your wire isolation, and eventualy burn your house. But the device won't suffer.

In Belgium we get a whopping 40A on 220V. In Lithuania only 16A.

How many in the US?
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#20
In the US it is 15A for residences. 40 amps is outrageously high,......and highly dangerous. Are you sure you get that output there?
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