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Japanese Culture..........
#1
And speaking of Japan, and some of its more strange rituals, what is this all about Yohan?  I know we all love adrenaline, with some danger mixed in, but...........................   Hey, I'm an adrenaline junkie, and got the greatest adrenaline high from jumping out of airplanes, but this makes no sense to me.



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#2
I don't know, why this is in the thread of the 'Japanese Navy', totally off topics.
Maybe a thread about 'Japanese Culture' could be created for questions like this one.

I am not a specialist for that, but this is a festival about cutting trees for the construction of new Shinto shrines, I think.
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#3
Ok. You got it "Y".

Incidentally, do you need an avatar?
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#4
When it's about traditions, everything is possible. It may be dangerous but what a fun it must be...
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#5
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/01...2Ai5U8poUx

Maybe the right thread and the right time after some shootings in USA, to report about gun control in Japan.

Of course, such a regulation as here in Japan is totally impossible in USA out of various reasons.

Quote:Even gangsters live in fear of Japan’s gun laws

It’s almost impossible to get to a gun in Japan, and selling one or owning one is a serious crime. Fire the gun? Possibly life imprisonment. Gun-control laws are taken so seriously that police will pursue a violator all the way to the grave — and maybe beyond.

The rationale for this is simple: “Of course, guns don’t kill people; people kill people — guns just make it a lot easier to kill a lot of people. That’s why Japan bans them and that’s why my job was catching people with guns and putting them in jail. Usually, long before they could ever put their finger on the trigger.”

Those are the words of a retired Kanto-region police detective with more than 25 years’ experience pursuing cases involving violations of the Firearms (& Swords) Control Law. Four of those years were in the Organized Crime Control Division Five, whose sole purpose is to handle drugs or weapons cases, nothing else.

In a long interview, this former officer who I will call Detective X because he requested anonymity for safety reasons, went on to explain just how seriously gun control is taken in Japan — offering information I followed up with further research.

“In Japan, no civilian is allowed to have a gun,” he stated simply. “In order to prevent atrocious crimes using firearms, possession of small arms was banned in 1965, with strict penalties for violations of the law. As time has gone on the penalties have increased and every year we try to drive down the number of people owning guns.”

Japan does allow the possession of hunting rifles and air guns (for sporting use), but the restrictions and checks are extremely strict.

“You have to bring your rifle in every year for inspection. You have to pass a drug test. You can’t have a criminal record. A doctor has to certify you’re mentally and physically healthy. You have to actually go to the firing range and show that you can use the weapon. If you have any sort of issue, we’re going to take away your firearms,” Detective X said.

“Sometimes, police officers even go to the neighborhoods where a gun owner lives and interview neighbors to make sure the owner isn’t causing problems or having issues with his spouse,” he added.

However, the focus is not only on ensuring gun owners don’t misuse their weapons, but also on getting rid of what the police call nemuri-ju (sleeping guns).

“There are not many hunters left now and many people get too old to use their weapons. If they can’t fire them properly, they get taken away. The fewer guns that are out there, the safer Japan is. That’s how we look at it,” Detective X explained.

The police checks are severe. In July 2008, a 45-year-old white-collar worker on the island of Shikoku who tried to renew his shotgun registration using a forged medical certificate was arrested following extensive checks on charges of forgery and violations of the firearms-control law.

According to the National Police Agency’s 2012 White Paper on Crime, in 2011 there were 246,783 licensed firearms in Japan, and 122,515 licensed owners out of a population of more than 126 million. In the same year, 27 people were denied permission to own a weapon, and 95 others had their permits taken away. Compare these figures with 2009 — when there were 299,939 licensed firearms and 142,294 licensed owners — and it’s clear these numbers are falling. So, too, are the number of shootings and gun deaths.

In 2002, there were 158 shootings in Japan and 24 deaths. Last year there were 45 shootings and eight deaths — and of the 45 shootings, 33 were yakuza-related.

“Japan is basically a place where only yakuza and cops have guns,” Detective X stated. “We fire our guns less, so most of the shootings in Japan are yakuza versus yakuza — and as long as the yakuza are killing each other, the general public and the police didn’t seem to mind. But not anymore. There have been too many stray bullets.”

The retired cop then noted that even the yakuza don’t like to use guns these days — because the penalties are too high.

A turning point was the Dec. 26, 1997, arrest of Kaneyoshi Kuwata, a boss of the powerful Yamaguchi-gumi gang, for illegal possession of firearms along with one of his henchmen. Acting on a tip, police blocked off all the roads in Tokyo’s glitzy Roppongi district and cornered Kuwata’s convoy of Mercedes. They then searched all the cars and, when they found a pistol in one of them, Kuwata was — in a precedent-setting legal move — arrested as an accomplice on gun-possession charges. After a long court battle, he was sentenced to seven years in prison.

Under current laws, if a low-level yakuza is caught with a gun and bullets that match, he’ll be charged with aggravated possession of firearms and will then face an average seven-year prison term. Simply firing a gun carries a penalty of three years to life. And for the “accomplice” reasons above, a yakuza boss may decide a death sentence is more appropriate if his thug miraculously gets released on bail before going to jail.

One mid-level yakuza boss told me, “Having a gun now is like having a time bomb. Do you think any sane person wants to keep one around the house?”

The police are not given a free hand in using guns either. Internal controls make it very difficult for a gun or even a single bullet to fall into the hands of criminals.

“When we go to the firing range, we get an allotted number of bullets, Detective X said. “When we’re done firing, we collect the shells and return the gun. If one shell is missing, the police station goes into a panic.”

Then the former officer waxed a little nostalgic. “Because of all the paperwork, in the old days sometimes we didn’t even take guns with us on raids of yakuza offices. I almost got my head blown off once because of that. … The guy had his gun in the dresser next to his futon. After that I made sure we carried guns with us on all our raids.”

However, Detective X said police sometimes misuse their weapons: “A few years ago, an officer on duty used his gun to kill himself — clearly non-designated usage, so that’s a crime.” He was charged posthumously to publicly show that even the dead can’t get away with breaking the firearms laws, and to shame his family. It may seem like overkill but it drives home the point.

“You can’t easily hold up a convenience store or shoot someone to death if you don’t have a gun,” Detective X put it in a nutshell. Unlike in the United States, that’s Crime Prevention 101 in Japan.
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#6
Japan can successfully get away with this because it is still fundamentally a closed, and stable, island society.  According to the CIA Factbook, the demographics are,

Japanese - 98.5%
Korean    - 00.5%
Chinese   - 00.4%
Other      - 00.6%

Muslims  - 00.08/% according to Wikipedia

Japanese society is much easier to monitor as a result.

PS: I haven't checked into this lately, but what is the existing rate of suicides in Japan?
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#7
Very high.
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#8
(06-14-2016, 04:34 PM)Fredledingue Wrote: Very high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_co...icide_rate

Well, so and so, according to WHO

Japan is # 17, rather high but not at the top...

South Korea is very high (# 2), but also Russia and India show up with data higher than Japan.

It's not easy to investigate suicide, as there are various sources offering oftencontradictory data and there are differences between men/women.

However South Korea suicide rate is and was always listed much higher than Japan by all sources.
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#9
Speaking about Japanese culture.......

https://i.imgur.com/ZGv3jNP.gifv
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
(05-31-2016, 02:23 PM)John L Wrote: Ok.  You got it "Y".  

Incidentally, do you need an avatar?

What kind of avatar do you suggest?

A Japanese with a cowboy hat?

Or a Westerner in a kimono?

Or a picture of Buddhist temple with a Church organ inside? (Yes, this does exist in Tokyo, no joke)
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#11
(06-19-2016, 02:40 AM)yohan Wrote:
(05-31-2016, 02:23 PM)John L Wrote: Ok.  You got it "Y".  

Incidentally, do you need an avatar?

What kind of avatar do you suggest?

A Japanese with a cowboy hat?

Or a Westerner in a kimono?

Or a picture of Buddhist temple with a Church organ inside? (Yes, this does exist in Tokyo, no joke)

Whatever you like. Its nice to have a personality on the site, instead of some vacantness. Anything you like that is unique for you.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#12
(06-19-2016, 04:02 PM)John L Wrote: Whatever you like.  Its nice to have a personality on the site, instead of some vacantness.  Anything you like that is unique for you.

OK, avatar uploaded. This is I, riding a motorcycle in Thailand near my second home in Pattaya.
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#13
(06-25-2016, 10:54 PM)yohan Wrote:
(06-19-2016, 04:02 PM)John L Wrote: Whatever you like.  Its nice to have a personality on the site, instead of some vacantness.  Anything you like that is unique for you.

OK, avatar uploaded. This is I, riding a motorcycle in Thailand near my second home in Pattaya.

Ahh-Right!   Very Good!
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#14
Here's the biggest downside of Japanese culture as of now. Their replacement rate is one of the world's worst. They're not having babies, and they don't choose to welcome immigrants. Its a sure fire recipe for self-suicide.

As Japan's population shrinks, bears and boars roam where schools and shrines once thrived

Robots will not fill the gap either. Spiteful
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#15
What to do?

This article is ignoring the fact, that Japan has now about 127 million people and Japan is smaller than California.
Japan is 25 times smaller than USA by land size, but South Korea is even worse off than Japan with over 50 million people.

USA has now merely a bit more than 300 million people, what would you think about a population of 3200 million people in USA? Then you would feel like a Japanese or Korean.

This article shows some pictures in rural areas in Japan, but nothing about the cities, here in Metropolitan Tokyo we are about 38 million people during rush hour. Everybody living in the major Japanese cities prefers to reduce the Japanese population.

Simply said, too many people around in Japan. No resources within Japan. Even not enough food production. A population of 100 million or so might be OK, but not more. Nowadays Japan is forced to import up to 80 percent of all food - about 90 million people in Japan are eating nothing else but imported food every day. This cannot continue forever.
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#16
(07-15-2016, 10:07 AM)yohan Wrote: What to do?

This article is ignoring the fact, that Japan has now about 127 million people and Japan is smaller than California.
Japan is 25 times smaller than USA by land size, but South Korea is even worse off than Japan with over 50 million people.

USA has now merely a bit more than 300 million people, what would you think about a population of 3200 million people in USA? Then you would feel like a Japanese or Korean.

This article shows some pictures in rural areas in Japan, but nothing about the cities, here in Metropolitan Tokyo we are about 38 million people during rush hour. Everybody living in the major Japanese cities prefers to reduce the Japanese population.

Simply said, too many people around in Japan. No resources within Japan. Even not enough food production. A population of 100 million or so might be OK, but not more. Nowadays Japan is forced to import up to 80 percent of all food - about 90 million people in Japan are eating nothing else but imported food every day. This cannot continue forever.

But you are missing the main point of the article.  What is so bad is that Japan is not replenishing itself.  If it doesn't do this, it will be hindered by old age.  And in order to handle the huge expenses that go along with old people, the young will be forced to produce more, and give up more in order to serve their elders.  

In most vibrant societies, the replenishment rate is at least on par, but usually more, with the old citizenry.

Its a Lose-Lose situation for the long run.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#17
A friend who is a native Australian just emailed me that he has what is called an "Air Pod," manufactured by Japanese, that allows you to live for an hour or two in a compressed air environment, that allows you to take in 30% oxygen rather than the normal 21%. He claims injuries heal faster, and his brain is clearer. Of course, professional sports teams have been using hyperbaric chambers to hasten healing of injuries for decades. I wonder if this invention is motivated by a desire to extend lifespans.
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#18
Thankfully, Japan has always been in this situation, so developed the ideal reaction to it.

Zen Buddhism was developed as a minimalist lifestyle religion. No big sports in Japan - much more the idea of Zen flower arranging. Everything is based on the lowest calorie consumption possible. Elderly are revered and fit into the population as child-sitters, nannies, and teachers, so parents can work. Much of the agricultural area is on the sides of mountains, with terrace farming everywhere.

Even their ages-old life style can't keep up with population growth. That is what technology is for.
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#19
Yohan, have you seen this link which was posted on another thread?

Japan Reverts to Fascism

What is your take on it?
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#20
They fear the Chinese.
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